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52 records – page 1 of 6.

Acute pancreatitis in Buskerud, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11141
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Dec;31(12):1228
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
C D Jacobsen
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Dec;31(12):1228
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Notes
Comment On: Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Apr;31(4):411-48726312
PubMed ID
8976017 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol consumption among adolescents in 3 municipalities. A survey of local variations in alcohol consumption]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11353
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Sep 20;115(22):2759-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1995
Author
A. Grimsmo
B. Storset
J A Odegaard
Author Affiliation
Samfunnsmedisinsk forskningssenter Surnadal, Universitetet i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Sep 20;115(22):2759-63
Date
Sep-20-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications - psychology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Abstract
Drinking habits among 663 adolescents 14, 15, 17 and 18 years of age in three local communities were investigated by means of a questionnaire. Half had tasted alcohol already at the age of 14 years. The total amount consumed per person per year averaged 3.5 litres pure alcohol. Geographical variations in consumption were more than six-fold. At the age of 17 years, boys began to consume more than girls. In both sexes, home distilled spirits was the most common beverage obtained or provided illegally. The main reason for drinking alcohol seems to be to get drunk.
PubMed ID
7570489 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption debut: predictors and consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10924
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1998 Jan;59(1):32-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
W. Pedersen
A. Skrondal
Author Affiliation
NOVA, Norwegian Social Research, Oslo.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1998 Jan;59(1):32-42
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Child
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Motivation
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Facilitation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of the timing of alcohol consumption debut and to analyze possible associations between the timing of debut and later alcohol consumption and possible alcohol-related problems. METHOD: A population sample of 465 adolescents (249 girls) from the greater Oslo area was followed up through five data collections over a 6-year span. By means of generalized structural equation modeling--accommodating survival variables--parental and friends' influences on debut age were estimated. Further, the consequences of the age of debut on subsequent alcohol consumption and alcohol problems were studied, taking other influences into consideration. In particular, possible gender differences were investigated. RESULTS: The mean age for alcohol consumption debut was 14.8 years. The age of alcohol debut had an independent effect on both future alcohol consumption and the development of alcohol-related problems, and the effects were invariant across sex. According to the estimated model, a 10% delay in debut age will lead to a 35% decrease in subsequent expected alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol debut was an excellent predictor of subsequent alcohol consumption and alcohol problems. The strong preventive implication is that interventions should be implemented in order to postpone alcohol debut age. A weak implication is that preventive measures should be implemented for the early onset drinkers. Further, it seems to be important to give high priority to more thorough studies on the exact nature of the relationships we have investigated here.
PubMed ID
9498313 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):481; author reply 481-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-2006
Author
Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):481; author reply 481-2
Date
Feb-9-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Humans
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
PubMed ID
16477297 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Sep 20;115(22):2757-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1995
Author
O G Aasland
Author Affiliation
Legeforeningens forskningsinstitutt, Lysaker.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Sep 20;115(22):2757-8
Date
Sep-20-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholism - complications - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
PubMed ID
7570488 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol related mortality 1980-90, how many children are affected?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11603
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 28;114(6):697-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1994
Author
S E Clausen
L B Kristofersen
Author Affiliation
Norsk institutt for by- og regionforskning, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 28;114(6):697-701
Date
Feb-28-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Abandoned - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parents
Registries
Single Parent
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
During the decade 1980 to 1990, 3,500 persons in Norway, under 30 years of age lost their mother or father as a result of an alcohol-related disease. Many of these persons were small children. The article presents research based on linkage of data from the population census of 1980, causes of death and the population register. The results show large regional differences in the rates of children who lost a parent due to misuse of alcohol. Even larger differences were observed between the different districts within the city of Oslo. Differences in registered sales and the consumption of illicitly distilled alcohol both help to explain the regional differences between counties.
PubMed ID
8191454 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related sickness absence among young employees: gender differences and the prevention paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259673
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Jun;24(3):480-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Line A Schou
Elisabet E Storvoll
Inger Synnøve Moan
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Jun;24(3):480-5
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcohol-Induced Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
Few studies have examined alcohol-related sickness absence among young employees, although young adults are known to drink quite heavily. There are substantial differences in drinking patterns between men and women, yet gender differences have rarely been the main focus in research on alcohol-related sickness absence. Thus the present paper aims to examine gender differences in the prevalence of alcohol-related sickness absence among young employees in Norway, and in the associations between drinking patterns and such absence. Further, to examine whether the prevention paradox applies to alcohol-related sickness absence among both genders.
A sample of employed young adults, 49.7% male (N = 1762, mean age = 28.3; SD = 1.9), was obtained from a general population survey of Norwegians. Self-reported measures on alcohol-related sickness absence and various drinking measures were applied.
Men reported absence from work due to drinking almost twice as often as women. There was a statistically significant gender difference in the drinking-absence association only for one of the three alcohol measures, indicating a stronger relationship among women. The heaviest drinkers (about 6% of the sample) reported a disproportionally large share of alcohol-related sickness absence (19%), yet the vast majority of such absence was found among the moderate drinkers (81%).
Alcohol-related sickness absence is more common among men than women. This gender difference may reflect differences in drinking habits rather than the likelihood of being absent after drinking. The results indicate that the prevention paradox applies to alcohol-related sickness absence among young employees of both genders.
PubMed ID
24675063 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related violence: the impact of drinking pattern and drinking context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11149
Source
Addiction. 1996 Nov;91(11):1651-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
I. Rossow
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway. imr@sita.no
Source
Addiction. 1996 Nov;91(11):1651-61
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Social Environment
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The impact of alcohol consumption, drinking pattern and drinking context on involvement in alcohol-related violence was assessed in a survey of 2711 Norwegian adults. Having taken part in a fight while influenced by alcohol and having been injured by an intoxicated person during the past year was reported by 3% and 2.4% of the respondents, respectively. Involvement in alcohol-related violence was most often reported among younger people, among single people, and it was positively associated with alcohol consumption, frequency of intoxication and frequency of visiting public drinking places. Both frequency of intoxication and overall alcohol consumption were positively associated with the probability of having been in a fight while intoxicated. Frequency of visits to public drinking places was significantly associated with the risk of being injured by an intoxicated person, also when own drinking pattern was controlled for. The results also indicated that the more often drinking takes place in public drinking places, the less is the impact of intoxication on the probability of getting into a fight.
PubMed ID
8972923 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between alcohol consumption and risk of hip fracture differs by age and gender in Cohort of Norway: a NOREPOS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299340
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2457-2467
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
A J Søgaard
A H Ranhoff
H E Meyer
T K Omsland
W Nystad
G S Tell
K Holvik
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway. anne.johanne.sogaard@fhi.no.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2018 Nov; 29(11):2457-2467
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
The association between alcohol consumption and hip fracture differed by gender: Men aged 30-59 years drinking frequently or 14+ gl/week had higher risk than moderate drinkers. No significant association was seen in older men. Women not drinking alcohol had higher risk than those drinking moderately both regarding frequency and amount.
We aimed to examine alcohol consumption and risk of hip fracture according to age and gender in the population-based Cohort of Norway (1994-2003).
Socio-demographics, lifestyle, and health were self-reported and weight and height were measured in 70,568 men and 71,357 women =?30 years. Information on subsequent hip fractures was retrieved from hospitals' electronic patient registries during 1994-2013. Frequency of alcohol consumption was categorized: never/seldom, moderate (=?2-3 times/week), or frequent (=?4 times/week), and amount as number of glasses per week: 0, 1-6, 7-13, 14-27, and 28+. Type of alcohol (wine vs. beer/hard liquor) was also examined. Cox's proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) stratified on gender and baseline age
PubMed ID
30006884 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors associated with age-related macular degeneration: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261639
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2014 Nov;92(7):662-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Maja G Erke
Geir Bertelsen
Tunde Peto
Anne K Sjølie
Haakon Lindekleiv
Inger Njølstad
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2014 Nov;92(7):662-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Arctic Regions
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - complications
Overweight - complications
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
To examine associations between cardiovascular risk factors and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
A population-based, cross-sectional study of Caucasians aged 65-87 years was conducted in Norway in 2007/2008. Retinal photographs were graded for AMD. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed based on questionnaires addressing habits of smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, health and medication; and physical examination comprising anthropometric measurements, blood pressure and blood sampling. Cardiovascular disease status was obtained from a validated end-point registry.
Gradable photographs were available for 2631 participants, of whom 92 (3.5%) subjects had late AMD. In the multivariable analysis of late AMD, significant interactions were found between sex and the variables age, triglyceride level, use of lipid-lowering drugs and physical exercise. Current daily smoking was significantly related to late AMD in both sexes (odds ratio (OR) 4.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.69-9.76 and OR 3.59, 95% CI 1.17-11.04, women and men, respectively) compared with never smokers. Higher number of pack years was associated with the presence of large drusen (>125 µm) (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.09 per 5 years). Higher systolic blood pressure (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01-1.12 per 5 mmHg), overweight (OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.13-7.29) and obesity (OR 2.92, 95% CI 1.06-8.03), physical exercise duration (OR 0.41, 95% 0.18-0.96 for 30 min or more compared with less) and frequency (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23-0.92 for weekly or more often compared to less) were associated with late AMD in women only.
Smoking was strongly associated with AMD, in line with results from other populations. Also, late AMD was related to higher systolic blood pressure, physical inactivity, overweight and obesity in women.
PubMed ID
24460653 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.