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A 32-year longitudinal study of alcohol consumption in Swedish women: Reduced risk of myocardial infarction but increased risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275258
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dominique Hange
Jóhann A Sigurdsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Valter Sundh
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Beer
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess associations between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the 32-year incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, as well as mortality, in a middle-aged female population.
Prospective study.
Gothenburg, Sweden, population about 430 000.
Representative sample of a general population of women (1462 in total) aged 38 to 60 years in 1968-1969, followed up to the ages of 70 to 92 years in 2000-2001.
Associations between alcohol intake and later risk of mortality and morbidity from myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, studied longitudinally.
During the follow-up period, 185 women developed myocardial infarction, 162 developed stroke, 160 women became diabetic, and 345 developed cancer. Women who drank beer had a 30% lower risk (hazards ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.95) of developing myocardial infarcion and almost half the risk (HR 0.51 CI 0.33-0.80). A significant association between increased risk of death from cancer and high spirits consumption was also shown (hazards ratio [HR] 1.47, CI 1.06-2.05).
Women with moderate consumption of beer had a reduced risk of developing myocardial infarction. High spirits consumption was associated with increased risk of cancer mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194171 View in PubMed
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[40 percent of high school pupils abuse alcohol. Strong connection with exposure to physical or sexual violence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129824
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Aug 24-30;108(34):1556-9
Publication Type
Article

60- and 72-month follow-up of children prenatally exposed to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol: cognitive and language assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222648
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P A Fried
C M O'Connell
B. Watkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):383-91
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Aptitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Synergism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Development Disorders - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - adverse effects
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Abstract
Cognitive and receptive language development were examined in 135 60-month-old and 137 72-month-old children for whom prenatal exposure to marijuana, cigarettes, and alcohol had been ascertained. Discriminant Function analysis revealed an association between prenatal cigarette exposure and lower cognitive and receptive language scores at 60 and 72 months. This paralleled and extended observations made with this sample at annual assessments at 12 to 48 months of age. Unlike observations made at 48 months, prenatal exposure to marijuana was not associated with the cognitive and verbal outcomes. Relatively low levels of maternal alcohol consumption did not have significant relationships with the outcome variables. The importance of assessing subtle components rather than global cognitive and language skills to detect potential behavioral teratogenic effects of the drugs being examined is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1992 Dec;13(6):425-81469111
PubMed ID
1469105 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abandonment of mandatory jail for impaired drivers in Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11418
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1995 Apr;27(2):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
H L Ross
H. Klette
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131, USA.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1995 Apr;27(2):151-7
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Norway
Prisons - legislation & jurisprudence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
In 1988 and 1990, respectively, Norway and Sweden adopted legal reforms including abandonment of mandatory jail sentences for persons driving with BACs above specific limits. Interrupted time-series analysis finds that in both countries traffic deaths diminished simultaneously with the reforms, consistent with the understanding that Scandinavian success in reducing impaired driving does not depend upon mandatory jail.
PubMed ID
7786382 View in PubMed
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Abstinence, occasional drinking and binge drinking in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92823
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rundberg Jenny
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Romelsjö Anders
Ojehagen Agneta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund-Psychiatry, USIL, Lund UniversityHospital, Kioskgatan 19, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Social Environment
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although drinking patterns in women have received increased attention, few studies have focused on middle-aged women. Drinking patterns were investigated in a population sample of 513 Swedish women aged 50-59, and analysed in relation to social situation, and mental and physical health. The chi-square test was used to analyse differences in proportions. Variables showing significant differences were entered into a multivariate or multinomial logistic regression model. Abstainers and occasional drinkers had lower levels of education and more often regular medical control compared with weekly drinkers. Furthermore, abstainers more often had disability pension. Among women drinking alcohol, 56.6% affirmed binge drinking within the last year and 39.4% within the last month. Binge drinkers did not differ in terms of social situation, mental or physical health, compared with other drinkers. Drinking to relieve tension was affirmed by 7.2%. These women had more mental symptoms and less contact with friends compared with other drinkers; furthermore, they were more often binge drinkers. Binge drinking was common and health and social consequences of this drinking pattern in middle-aged women need to be further explored. Women drinking to relieve tension may need intervention for both drinking habits and mental health.
PubMed ID
18609026 View in PubMed
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[Acute flank pain syndrome: a common presentation of acute renal failure in young men in Iceland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135735
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Apr;97(4):215-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Helga Margret Skuladottir
Margret Birna Andresdottir
Sverrir Hardarson
Margret Arnadottir
Author Affiliation
Lyflækningadeild, Karolinska háskólasjúkrahúsinu, Stokkhólmi, (áður lyflækningasviði Landspítala).
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Apr;97(4):215-21
Date
Apr-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Flank Pain - epidemiology
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Syndrome
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to calculate the incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome in Iceland and to describe the case series.
The hospital records of those who fulfilled the following criteria were studied: age 18-41 years, acute renal failure, and a visit to Landspitali University Hospital in 1998-2007. The acute flank pain syndrome was defined as severe flank pain in combination with acute renal failure, unexplained except for the possible consumption of NSAIDs, ethanol or both. Information was collected about the sales of NSAIDs.
One hundred and six patients had acute renal failure. Of those, 21 had the acute flank pain syndrome (20%). The annual incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome increased threefold during the study period. The average incidence was 3.2/100.000/year (relative to the population of the Reykjavik area) and 2.0/100.000/year (relative to the population of Iceland). 18 patients were male and the median age was 26 (19-35) years. The symptoms regressed spontaneously during a few days or weeks. There was history of NSAID intake in 15, ethanol consumption in 15, either in 20, and both in nine patients. The sales figures of NSAIDs were high and they increased during the study period, especially those of the over-the-counter sales of ibuprofen.
The incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome was high. The paper describes the largest case series that has been published since the withdrawal of suprofen in 1987. Young people should be warned about consuming NSAIDs during or directly after binge drinking.
PubMed ID
21451200 View in PubMed
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Acute pancreatitis: a prospective study on incidence, etiology, and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108807
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Sep;25(9):1068-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Hanna Vidarsdottir
Pall H Möller
Halla Vidarsdottir
Hildur Thorarinsdottir
Einar S Björnsson
Author Affiliation
aDepartment of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care bDepartment of Surgery cDepartment of Gastroenterology, The National University Hospital of Iceland dFaculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland eDepartment of Surgery, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Sep;25(9):1068-75
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Pseudocyst - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pancreatitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Pancreatitis, Alcoholic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prospective and population-based studies on the incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) are lacking. Alcohol consumption has increased considerably in Iceland during the last decade. We aimed to determine the incidence, etiology, severity, and complications of AP and compare the results with a previous study on AP in Iceland.
A prospective population-based study of patients diagnosed with AP at the National University Hospital of Iceland during 1 year (2010-2011). Information on symptoms, etiology, and complications was registered.
During the study period, 134 patients were diagnosed with AP, 78 men (58%), median age 57 years (interquartile range 42-71). Overall, 89/104 (86%) patients had their first attack of pancreatitis, yielding a crude incidence of 40/100 000 inhabitants/year. The major etiological groups were as follows: gallstones, 52 cases (42%); alcohol 29, (23%); postendoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography in 12 (9.5%); medications in eight (6.3%); and idiopathic in 15 (12%). Alcohol was more often the cause in men (25 vs. 4, P
PubMed ID
23839162 View in PubMed
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Acute pancreatitis in Buskerud, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11141
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Dec;31(12):1228
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
C D Jacobsen
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Dec;31(12):1228
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Notes
Comment On: Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Apr;31(4):411-48726312
PubMed ID
8976017 View in PubMed
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Addiction Research Centres and the Nurturing of Creativity. Substance abuse research in a modern health care centre: the case of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143386
Source
Addiction. 2011 Apr;106(4):689-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Jürgen Rehm
Norman Giesbrecht
Louis Gliksman
Kathryn Graham
Anh D Le
Robert E Mann
Robin Room
Brian Rush
Rachel F Tyndale
Samantha Wells
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. jtrehm@aol.com
Source
Addiction. 2011 Apr;106(4):689-97
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Foundations - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Policy
Research - organization & administration
Research Support as Topic
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health is one of the premier centres for research related to substance use and addiction. This research began more than 50 years ago with the Addiction Research Foundation (ARF), an organization that contributed significantly to knowledge about the aetiology, treatment and prevention of substance use, addiction and related harm. After the merger of the ARF with three other institutions in 1998, research on substance use continued, with an additional focus on comorbid substance use and other mental health disorders. In the present paper, we describe the structure of funding and organization and selected current foci of research. We argue for the continuation of this successful model of integrating basic, epidemiological, clinical, health service and prevention research under the roof of a health centre.
PubMed ID
20491727 View in PubMed
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764 records – page 1 of 77.