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7483 records – page 1 of 749.

2,3-Butanediol in plasma from an alcoholic mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol by gas-chromatographic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12006
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
A W Jones
L. Nilsson
S A Gladh
K. Karlsson
J. Beck-Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol Toxicology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Clin Chem. 1991 Aug;37(8):1453-5
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - blood
Butylene Glycols - blood - pharmacokinetics
Chromatography, Gas
Diagnostic Errors
Ethylene Glycol
Ethylene Glycols - blood - poisoning
Flame Ionization
Humans
Male
Abstract
2,3-Butanediol was mistakenly identified as ethylene glycol in plasma specimens from two alcoholic patients. The cyclic phenylboronate ester derivatives of 2,3-butanediol and ethylene glycol had the same retention time when OV-17 was used as the stationary phase for gas chromatography. This led to incorrect diagnosis of ethylene glycol poisoning and unnecessary invasive therapy. Plasma from two chronic alcoholics contained 2,3-butanediol at 3.5 and 3.4 mmol/L. The elimination half-life of 2,3-butanediol was 3.9 days when ethanol was administered during therapy for suspected ethylene glycol poisoning. Low concentrations of 2,3-butanediol might be present in blood of chronic alcoholics as a result of a novel pathway of intermediary metabolism associated with some forms of alcoholism. However, a more likely explanation for fairly high concentrations of 2,3-butanediol is enzymatic production from 2-butanone. This ketone occurs in denatured alcohol preparations often consumed by alcoholics in Sweden.
PubMed ID
1868611 View in PubMed
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[2 alcoholization operations on the labyrinth of the ear]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13256
Source
Zh Ushn Nos Gorl Bolezn. 1975 Sep-Oct;(5):93-4
Publication Type
Article

The 2-year course following detoxification treatment of substance abuse: the possible influence of psychiatric comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11106
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K. Tómasson
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Landspítalinn, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 1997;247(6):320-7
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the course and outcome in a nationwide representative sample (n = 351) of treatment-seeking substance users over a 28-month period was studied prospectively. The patients were administered the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and a questionnaire on drinking history. At 16 and 28 months after admission the patients returned a questionnaire on drinking history and mental health. In cases of those lacking information on either follow-up (45%), details on drinking status was obtained from informants. Completely abstinent were 16%. Generalized anxiety disorder and/or social phobia at the index admission predicted abstinence during the follow-up [odds ratio (OR) = 0.25], whereas onset of alcoholism among these patients after age 25 years predicted a worse prognosis (OR = 13.5). Also increasing number of social consequences related to abuse (OR = 1.3) and drinking more than the median (OR = 2.1) predicted a poor outcome. The abstinent group had significantly better mental health at follow-up. The patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders at admission were worse at follow-up. Although substance use disorders and comorbid psychiatric disorders have to a certain degree separate courses, there is nevertheless significant interaction between them. Early treatment and recognition of comorbid psychiatric disorders among substance abusers is necessary.
PubMed ID
9477012 View in PubMed
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A 2-year follow-up of 120 Swedish female alcoholics treated early in their drinking career: prediction of drinking outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10097
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
B. Haver
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research Section, Stockholm, Sweden. brit.haver@psyk.uib.no
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - therapy
Biological Markers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: One hundred twenty women alcoholics recruited to a treatment program called EWA (Early Treatment for Women With Alcohol Addiction) were studied. The selected women were not previously treated for alcohol abuse. METHODS: The women were followed up by use of a structured personal interview, biomarkers sensitive for alcohol abuse (i.e., glutamyl transpeptidase), and questionnaires, by using defined criteria for abstinence, social drinking, satisfactory drinking outcome, and unsatisfactory drinking outcome. RESULTS: Drinking outcome was good (i.e., total abstinence, social drinking, or satisfactory drinking outcome) for 67% of the women during the total follow-up time, by use of strict criteria for relapse. The results were corroborated by the biomarkers. Similar results were reported from two previously studied groups of women from the same department. However, the frequency of abstinence was higher and social drinking was significantly lower among this sample of women. Daily drinking, the use of sedatives, and a long duration of pretreatment alcohol abuse predicted an unfavorable outcome. However, a long duration of outpatient treatment predicted a good outcome, whereas treatment dropout was related to an unsatisfactory drinking outcome. A majority of the women (96%) rated the treatment experience and the treatment program favorably. The overall good results might reflect the selection of the subjects studied. CONCLUSIONS: Improving treatment program adherence would probably improve outcome for the women with an unsatisfactory drinking outcome.
PubMed ID
11707633 View in PubMed
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3-D modeling substantiates perfluorinated theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82705
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Renner Rebecca
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Alcohols
Arctic Regions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Fluorocarbons - analysis - chemistry
Industry
Manufactured Materials
Models, Theoretical
Octanoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Notes
Comment On: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):924-3016509338
PubMed ID
16509290 View in PubMed
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A 3 year follow-up study of health care students' sense of coherence and related smoking, drinking and physical exercise factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186071
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Merja Kuuppelomäki
Pekka Utriainen
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Centre for Social Welfare and Health, Seinäjoki Polytechnic, Koskenalantie 16 Seinäjoki Fin-60220, Finland. merja.kuuppelomaki@seamk.fi
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):383-8
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Educational Status
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Smoking - psychology
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to describe the sense of coherence (SOC) of three groups of Finnish polytechnic students (n=287) at the beginning of their studies and to follow it during a period of 3 year amongst the health care students (n=63) of this group. The associations between SOC and smoking, drinking and physical exercise were also studied. The data were collected with a questionnaire which included Antonovsky's (Adv. Nurs. Sci. 1(1983)37) SOC scale. Data analysis was with SPSS statistical software. The students showed a strong sense of coherence at the beginning of their studies. Physical activity was related to the strength of SOC, but no association was found with smoking and drinking. Health care students showed a stronger SOC at the beginning of their studies than the two other groups. During the follow-up focused on the health care students, SOC weakened in 6%, remained unchanged in 65% and strengthened in 32% of the participants. Smoking, drinking and physical exercise showed no association with these changes. Future research should be focused on identifying factors that are related to SOC during education.
PubMed ID
12667515 View in PubMed
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[4 simultaneous cases of methanol poisoning caused by home-made plum brandy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12892
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Jan 24;145(4):232-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-1983

5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist p-MPPI attenuates acute ethanol effects in mice and rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9998
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2002 Mar 29;322(1):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2002
Author
Nina K Popova
Elena A Ivanova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyeva 10, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia. npopova@bionet.nsc.ru
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2002 Mar 29;322(1):1-4
Date
Mar-29-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System - drug therapy - metabolism - physiopathology
Aminopyridines - pharmacology
Animals
Brain - drug effects - metabolism - physiopathology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Interactions - physiology
Drug Tolerance - physiology
Ethanol - pharmacology
Hypothermia - chemically induced - drug therapy - physiopathology
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C3H
Neurons - drug effects - metabolism
Piperazines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Serotonin - drug effects - metabolism
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT1
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin - metabolism
Serotonin Antagonists - pharmacology
Sleep - drug effects - physiology
Startle Reaction - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
The effect of a selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist, 4-(2'-methoxy-)phenyl-1-[2'-(N-2"-pyridinyl)-p-iodobenzamino-]ethyl-piperazine (p-MPPI), on acute ethanol-induced hypothermia, sleep and suppression of acoustic startle reflex in C3H/He mice and Wistar rats was studied. Administration of p-MPPI at the doses of 0.4, 0.7 and 1.0 mg/kg reduced in a dose-dependent manner the ethanol-induced hypothermia and the sleep time and attenuated the ethanol-induced decrease of acoustic startle reflex magnitude in mice. Similar p-MPPI (0.4 mg/kg) effects on ethanol-induced sleep and hypothermia were obtained in rats. It was concluded that 5-HT(1A) receptors were involved in the mechanisms of the ethanol-induced hypothermia and sleep, and that 5-HT(1A) antagonist increased acute ethanol tolerance.
PubMed ID
11958829 View in PubMed
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The 16% solution and other mysteries concerning the accuracy of alcohol consumption estimates based on sales data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247149
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1979 Jun;74(2):165-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
E. Single
N. Giesbrecht
Source
Br J Addict Alcohol Other Drugs. 1979 Jun;74(2):165-73
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages
Commerce
Drug Utilization
Humans
Ontario
Records as Topic
Wine
PubMed ID
287509 View in PubMed
Less detail

7483 records – page 1 of 749.