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20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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[Diabetic nephropathy--screening, follow-up and treatment. Nephropathy Study Groups of The Finnish Diabetes Organization].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208498
Source
Nord Med. 1997 May;112(5):154-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
V. Koivisto
P H Groop
N P Huttunen
J. Kivekäs
A. Pasternack
M. Uusitupa
J. Viikari
Author Affiliation
Medicinska kliniken, Helsingfors Universitetscentralsjukhus.
Source
Nord Med. 1997 May;112(5):154-62
Date
May-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Albuminuria - urine
Child
Cost of Illness
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - physiopathology
Diabetic Nephropathies - diagnosis - economics - physiopathology - therapy
Dietary Proteins
Female
Finland
Humans
Hyperglycemia - therapy
Hypertension, Renal - therapy
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Kidney Diseases - complications
Pregnancy
Uremia - therapy
Abstract
Owing to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic nephropathy, its management has become more active and is now initiated earlier after the presence of microalbuminuria has been established. In 1996 the Finnish Diabetic Association's nephropathy group issued recommendations concerning screening for diabetic nephropathy, and treatment and follow-up of patients with the disease.
PubMed ID
9273505 View in PubMed
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Endostatin level is associated with kidney injury in the elderly: findings from two community-based cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265787
Source
Am J Nephrol. 2014;40(5):417-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Toralph Ruge
Axel C Carlsson
Tobias E Larsson
Juan-Jesús Carrero
Anders Larsson
Lars Lind
Johan Ärnlöv
Source
Am J Nephrol. 2014;40(5):417-24
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Endostatins - blood
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the associations between circulating endostatin and the different aspects of renal dysfunction, namely, estimated (cystatin C) glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR).
Two independent longitudinal community-based cohorts of elderly. ULSAM, n = 786 men; age 78 years; median GFR 74 ml/min/1.73 m(2); median ACR 0.80 mg/mmol); and PIVUS, n = 815; age 75 years; 51% women; median GFR; 67 ml/min/1.73 m(2); median ACR 1.39 mg/mmol. Cross-sectional associations between the endostatin levels and GFR as well as ACR, and longitudinal association between endostatin at baseline and incident CKD (defined as GFR
PubMed ID
25401956 View in PubMed
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Factors influencing the estimation of the albumin excretion rate in subjects with diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208342
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1997 Jun;20(3):152-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
S A Ross
G H Fick
L. Alima
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
Clin Invest Med. 1997 Jun;20(3):152-61
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Weight
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy - urine
Diabetic Nephropathies - urine
Diabetic Retinopathy - urine
Female
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Kinetics
Male
Models, Statistical
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
To evaluate alternative methods of calculating the albumin excretion rate (AER) in the absence of complete and accurate patient documentation, since microalbuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with serious complications and since patients often make errors in recording the volume and timing of urine collection, making AER calculations inaccurate.
Prospective study.
Recruitment sites, including all native reserves, across southern Alberta.
Population-based group of 1286 subjects with diabetes mellitus participating in the Southern Alberta Study of Diabetic Retinopathy.
Timed AERs were measured in the subjects; urinary albumin concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay.
A formula for the prediction of AER was based on the clinical data from the subjects. Several factors were considered in developing the formula: insulin-using status, weight, sex and urine and serum creatinine concentrations.
A mathematical model for estimation of the AER was developed; incorporation of insulin use, sex and weight provides a more accurate estimate of AER. According to this model, women typically appear to have a lower AER than men and heavier people appear to have a higher AER than people with lower body weight.
The use of mathematical formulae to calculate the AER provides an accurate estimate of the AER, particularly when data related to the volume and timing of urine collection are missing. These formulae will be valuable in large epidemiologic screening programs.
PubMed ID
9189646 View in PubMed
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Long-term trends in the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and the influence of cardiovascular risk factors in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286572
Source
Kidney Int. 2016 Sep;90(3):665-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Stein I Hallan
Marius A Øvrehus
Solfrid Romundstad
Dena Rifkin
Arnulf Langhammer
Paul E Stevens
Joachim H Ix
Source
Kidney Int. 2016 Sep;90(3):665-73
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - complications - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
England - epidemiology
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - complications - epidemiology - urine
Risk Adjustment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Surveillance of chronic kidney disease (CKD) prevalence over time and information on how changing risk factors influence this trend are needed to evaluate the effects of general practice and public health interventions. Because very few studies addressed this, we studied the total adult population of a demographically stable county representative of Norway using cross-sectional studies 10 years apart (Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT)2 and Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT)3, 65,237 and 50,586 participants, respectively). Thorough quality-control procedures and comparisons of methods over time excluded analytical drift, and multiple imputations of missing data combined with nonattendance weights contributed to unbiased estimates. CKD prevalence remained stable in Norway from 1995 through 1997 (11.3%) to 2006 through 2008 (11.1%). The association of survey period with CKD prevalence was modified by a strong decrease in blood pressure, more physical activity, and lower cholesterol levels. Without these improvements, a 2.8, 0.7, and 0.6 percentage points higher CKD prevalence could have been expected, respectively. In contrast, the prevalence of diabetes and obesity increased moderately, but the proportion of diabetic patients with CKD decreased significantly (from 33.4% to 28.6%). A CKD prevalence of 1 percentage point lower would have been expected without these changes. Thus, CKD prevalence remained stable in Norway for more than a decade in association with marked improvements in blood pressure, lipid levels, and physical activity and despite modest increases in diabetes and obesity.
PubMed ID
27344204 View in PubMed
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Microalbuminuria in diabetic patients--a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48954
Source
Acta Endocrinol Suppl (Copenh). 1981;242:53-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
P A Svendsen
B. Oxenbøll
J S Christiansen
Source
Acta Endocrinol Suppl (Copenh). 1981;242:53-4
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albuminuria - urine
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus - urine
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
PubMed ID
6940404 View in PubMed
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Microaneurysm count as a predictor of long-term progression in diabetic retinopathy in young patients with type 1 diabetes: the Danish Cohort of Pediatric Diabetes 1987 (DCPD1987).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264918
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2015 Feb;253(2):199-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
M L Rasmussen
R. Broe
U. Frydkjaer-Olsen
B S Olsen
H B Mortensen
T. Peto
J. Grauslund
Source
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2015 Feb;253(2):199-205
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albuminuria - urine
Aneurysm - diagnosis
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Macular Edema - diagnosis
Male
Photography
Prospective Studies
Retinal Vessels - pathology
Risk factors
Tomography, Optical Coherence
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate microaneurysm (MA) count as a predictor of long-term progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).
We examined 185 patients with T1DM at baseline (1995) and at follow-up (2011). At baseline, mean age and duration of diabetes were 20.6 and 12.9 years, respectively. Two-field (1995) and seven-field (2011) fundus photographs were taken in accordance with the European Diabetes Study Group (EURODIAB) and the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) protocol, respectively. DR was graded in accordance to the ETDRS protocol, allowing for non-standard photography at baseline. Baseline MAs were counted; patients without DR and those with MAs only were included. Multivariable logistic regressions were performed to investigate MA-count as a predictor of two-step progression, progression to proliferative DR (PDR), and incident diabetic macula edema (DME).
We included 138 patients (138 eyes). Of these, 58 had no retinopathy and 80 had MAs only. At follow-up, rates of two-step progression of DR, progression to PDR and incident DME were 52.9, 21.7, and 10.1 %, respectively. In logistic regression models, MA count was able to predict progression to PDR (OR: 1.51 per MA; 95 % CI: [1.04-2.20]) and DME (OR: 1.69 per MA; 95 % CI: [1.05-2.77]), but not two-step progression (OR 0.91 per MA, 95 % CI: [0.64-1.31]).
In younger patients with T1DM, MA count predicts long-term incidence of PDR and DME. This demonstrates that early DR is a warning sign of late retinopathy complications and that the number of MAs is an important factor for long-term outcome.
PubMed ID
24898428 View in PubMed
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N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein, and urinary albumin levels as predictors of mortality and cardiovascular events in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47074
Source
JAMA. 2005 Apr 6;293(13):1609-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-6-2005
Author
Caroline Kistorp
Ilan Raymond
Frants Pedersen
Finn Gustafsson
Jens Faber
Per Hildebrandt
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology and Endocrinology, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. cnkistorp@dadlnet.dk
Source
JAMA. 2005 Apr 6;293(13):1609-16
Date
Apr-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albuminuria - urine
Biological Markers - blood - urine
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - urine
Creatinine - urine
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain
Nerve Tissue Proteins - blood
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Abstract
CONTEXT: B-type natriuretic peptides have been shown to predict cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy individuals but their predictive ability for mortality and future cardiovascular events compared with C-reactive protein (CRP) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prognostic value of the N-amino terminal fragment of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) vs CRP and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio in an older adult population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A population-based prospective study of 764 participants aged 50 to 89 years from a community in Copenhagen, Denmark, in which 658 participants provided blood and urinary samples and were examined between September 1, 1998, and January 24, 2000. Of these participants, 626 without heart or renal failure were enrolled. A subgroup of 537 had no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline. During 5 years of follow-up (to December 31, 2003), 94 participants died and 65 developed a first major cardiovascular event. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk of mortality and first major cardiovascular event by baseline levels of NT-proBNP, CRP, and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio levels. RESULTS: After adjustment for the cardiovascular risk factors of age, sex, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension or ischemic heart disease, total cholesterol, and serum creatinine, the hazard ratio (HR) of mortality for values above the 80th percentile of NT-proBNP was 1.96 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-3.19); for CRP, 1.46 (95% CI, 0.89-2.24); and for urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, 1.88 (95% CI, 1.18-2.98). Additional adjustment for left ventricular systolic dysfunction did not markedly attenuate the predictive value of NT-proBNP (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.11-2.98). The absolute unadjusted increase in mortality risk for participants with values above the 80th percentile vs equal to or below the 80th percentile was 24.5% for NT-proBNP, 7.8% for CRP, and 19.5% for urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. The NT-proBNP levels were associated with first major cardiovascular events (nonfatal myocardial infarction, fatal coronary heart disease, unstable angina, heart failure, stroke, and transient ischemic attack) with an adjusted HR of 3.24 (95% CI, 1.80-5.79) vs 1.02 (95% CI, 0.56-1.85) for CRP and 2.32 (95% CI, 1.33-4.05) for urinary albumin/creatinine ratio when comparing participants with values above the 80th percentile with those with values equal to or below the 80th percentile. CONCLUSIONS: Measurements of NT-proBNP provide prognostic information of mortality and first major cardiovascular events beyond traditional risk factors. NT-proBNP was a stronger risk biomarker for cardiovascular disease and death than CRP was in nonhospitalized individuals aged 50 to 89 years.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2005 Apr 6;293(13):1667-915811987
Comment In: JAMA. 2005 Jul 20;294(3):303; author reply 303-416030272
PubMed ID
15811980 View in PubMed
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[Organ lesions and chronobiologic structure of circadian rhythm in arterial blood pressure in persons with arterial hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184426
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(4):7-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
L V Salamatina
A A Buganov
G I Ievleva
A S Skosyrev
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(4):7-10
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albuminuria - urine
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Chronic Disease
Chronobiology Disorders - complications
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The relation of 24-hour blood pressure monitoring indices with degree of target-organs damage in 114 non-natives of the Far North who had no previous antihypertensive treatment was studied. It was found out that mean BP influences on developing of chronic forms of vascular brain pathology, microalbuminuria degree correlates with pulse BP level, development of hypertensive retinopathy is associated with excessive variability of day BP.
PubMed ID
12872455 View in PubMed
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Relationship of proximal tubular injury to chronic kidney disease as assessed by urinary kidney injury molecule-1 in five cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285770
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2016 Sep;31(9):1460-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Sushrut S Waikar
Venkata Sabbisetti
Johan Ärnlöv
Axel C Carlsson
Josef Coresh
Harold I Feldman
Meredith C Foster
Gudeta D Fufaa
Johanna Helmersson-Karlqvist
Chi-Yuan Hsu
Paul L Kimmel
Anders Larsson
Yumin Liu
Lars Lind
Kathleen D Liu
Theodore E Mifflin
Robert G Nelson
Ulf Risérus
Ramachandran S Vasan
Dawei Xie
Xiaoming Zhang
Joseph V Bonventre
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2016 Sep;31(9):1460-70
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Biomarkers - urine
Female
Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1 - analysis
Humans
Kidney Tubules, Proximal - injuries - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - diagnosis - urine
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary biomarkers used to define CKD are serum creatinine and albuminuria. These biomarkers have directed focus on the filtration and barrier functions of the kidney glomerulus even though albuminuria results from tubule dysfunction as well. Given that proximal tubules make up ~90% of kidney cortical mass, we evaluated whether a sensitive and specific marker of proximal tubule injury, urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), is elevated in individuals with CKD or with risk factors for CKD.
We measured urinary KIM-1 in participants of five cohort studies from the USA and Sweden. Participants had a wide range of kidney function and were racially and ethnically diverse. Multivariable linear regression models were used to test the association of urinary KIM-1 with demographic, clinical and laboratory values.
In pooled, multivariable-adjusted analyses, log-transformed, creatinine-normalized urinary KIM-1 levels were higher in those with lower eGFR {ß = -0.03 per 10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.05 to -0.02]} and greater albuminuria [ß = 0.16 per unit of log albumin:creatinine ratio (95% CI 0.15-0.17)]. Urinary KIM-1 levels were higher in current smokers, lower in blacks than nonblacks and lower in users versus nonusers of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers.
Proximal tubule injury appears to be an integral and measurable element of multiple stages of CKD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27270293 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.