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[Albuminuria in persons with real hypertension, white coat hypertension and normotension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214950
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jun 5;157(23):3322-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1995
Author
K S Kristensen
L E Bang
A. Høegholm
J W Nielsen
J. Holm
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling, Centralsygehuset i Naestved.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jun 5;157(23):3322-5
Date
Jun-5-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Albuminuria - complications - diagnosis
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Creatinine - urine
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
A prospective comparison of office blood pressure, daytime ambulatory blood pressure and urinary albumin excretion was performed in 284 consecutive patients from general practice with newly diagnosed, untreated mild to moderate hypertension. Based on daytime ambulatory blood pressure 173 were classified as established hypertensives and 111 as white coat hypertensives. A sample of 127 subjects drawn from the Danish national register served as a normotensive control group. It was found that urinary albumin/creatinine ratio differed significantly between the three groups; the difference remained significant after correction for covariables. Early morning urine albumin/creatinine ratio was weakly but significantly correlated to blood pressure. Early morning urine albumin/creatinine ratio was as reproducible a measure as 24-hour albumin excretion. It is concluded that white coat hypertensive patients have less renal involvement than patients with established hypertension, but more than a normotensive control group.
PubMed ID
7631440 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria, metabolic syndrome and the risk of mortality and cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90754
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Solbu Marit D
Kronborg Jens
Jenssen Trond G
Njølstad Inger
Løchen Maja-Lisa
Mathiesen Ellisiv B
Wilsgaard Tom
Eriksen Bjørn O
Toft Ingrid
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. marit.solbu@unn.no
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Creatinine - urine
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Increased urinary albumin-excretion is a cardiovascular risk-factor. The cardiovascular risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is debated. The aim of the present prospective, population-based study of non-diabetic individuals was to examine the association between low-grade urinary albumin-excretion, MetS, and cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. METHODS: 5215 non-diabetic, non-proteinuric men and women participating in the Tromsø Study 1994-1995 were included. Urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured in three urine samples. The participants were categorized into four groups by the presence/absence of MetS (the International Diabetes Federation definition) and ACR in the upper tertile (>or=0.75 mg/mmol). RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 9.6 years for first ever myocardial infarction, 9.7 years for ischemic stroke and 12.4 years for mortality. High ACR (upper tertile)/MetS was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio (HR) 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30-2.37, por=0.75 mg/mmol was associated with cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality independently of MetS. MetS was not associated with any end-point beyond what was predicted from its components. Thus, low-grade albuminuria, but not MetS, may be used for risk stratification in non-diabetic subjects.
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):348-9; author reply 350-119201409
PubMed ID
19091314 View in PubMed
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Association between AGT T235 variant and microalbuminuria in Canadian Oji-Cree with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201715
Source
Clin Biochem. 1999 Apr;32(3):201-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
R A Hegele
S B Harris
A J Hanley
B. Zinman
Author Affiliation
Blackburn Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada. robert.hegele@rri.on.ca
Source
Clin Biochem. 1999 Apr;32(3):201-5
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Albuminuria - complications - genetics
Angiotensinogen - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Abstract
To assess the association between the common variation in the gene encoding angiotensinogen, AGT, and the presence of microalbuminuria in Canadian Oji-Cree with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
We compared the frequencies of the AGT promoter and M235T polymorphisms among three subgroups of adult Oji-Cree: 50 subjects who had type 2 diabetes with microalbuminuria, 6 subjects who had type 2 diabetes without albuminuria and 302 non-diabetic, normotensive subjects.
We found the AGT T235 allele was present at a significantly higher frequency, and that T235/T235 homozygotes were significantly more prevalent, among the subjects who had type 2 diabetes with microalbuminuria than among the subjects in the other two groups.
The findings suggest that the AGT T235 allele is a determinant of the nephropathy susceptibility related to type 2 diabetes in these aboriginal Canadians.
PubMed ID
10383081 View in PubMed
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Association between First Nations ethnicity and progression to kidney failure by presence and severity of albuminuria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105876
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Feb 4;186(2):E86-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-4-2014
Author
Susan M Samuel
Luz Palacios-Derflingher
Marcello Tonelli
Braden Manns
Lynden Crowshoe
Sofia B Ahmed
Min Jun
Nathalie Saad
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Feb 4;186(2):E86-94
Date
Feb-4-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Albuminuria - complications - ethnology
Cohort Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Renal Insufficiency - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Despite a low prevalence of chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate [GFR]
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2014 Feb 4;186(2):93-424295866
PubMed ID
24295865 View in PubMed
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Association of kidney function and albuminuria with cardiovascular mortality in older vs younger individuals: The HUNT II Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85184
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2007 Dec 10;167(22):2490-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2007
Author
Hallan Stein
Astor Brad
Romundstad Solfrid
Aasarød Knut
Kvenild Kurt
Coresh Josef
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU St Olav University Hospital, Olav Kyrres gt 17, Trondheim, Norway. stein.hallan@ntnu.no
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2007 Dec 10;167(22):2490-6
Date
Dec-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications - metabolism - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - mortality
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cardiovascular risk implications of a combined assessment of reduced kidney function and microalbuminuria are unknown. In elderly persons, traditional cardiovascular risk factors are less predictive, and measures of end organ damage, such as kidney disease, may be needed for improved cardiovascular mortality risk stratification. METHODS: The glomerular filtration rate was estimated from calibrated serum creatinine, and the urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured in 3 urine samples in 9,709 participants of the second Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT II), a Norwegian community-based health study, followed for 8.3 years with a 71% participation rate. RESULTS: An estimated glomerular filtration rate (EGFR) at levels of less than 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) was associated with higher cardiovascular mortality risk, whereas a higher ACR was associated with higher risk with no lower limit. Low EGFR and albuminuria were synergistic cardiovascular mortality risk factors. Compared with subjects with an EGFR greater than 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and ACR below the sex-specific median who were at the lowest risk, subjects with an EGFR of less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and microalbuminuria had an adjusted incidence rate ratio of 6.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.0-15.1; P
PubMed ID
18071172 View in PubMed
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Associations with retinopathy in type 2 diabetes: a population-based study in a Swedish rural area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48427
Source
Diabet Med. 1994 Nov;11(9):843-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
M. Falkenberg
K. Finnström
Author Affiliation
Community Health Care Centre, Kisa, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 1994 Nov;11(9):843-9
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications
Antihypertensive Agents - adverse effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - metabolism
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Population
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This population-based study was carried out in a rural area in Sweden. The impact of duration of diabetes, metabolic control, albuminuria, and mode of detection (screening or presence of overt symptoms at the time of diagnosis) on retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes aged under 70 years was investigated at a primary health care centre. Ninety-nine percent of all known persons with Type 2 diabetes were under care at the centre. The fundi were examined in all but one of those under 70 years, and a 100% attendance rate was noted with regard to other variables such as albuminuria, glycated haemoglobin, and blood lipids. A team approach (general practitioner, nurse specialist, dietitian, and chiropodist) with patient education as an integral part of the treatment has been practised for the past 15 years. Retinopathy was associated with duration of disease, glycaemic control, systolic blood pressure, detection by overt symptoms, and albuminuria. The risk of retinopathy was not associated with smoking or treatment category. The prevalence of retinopathy was 26.5% in the whole population, and 18.8% among the patients who had been treated for their diabetes at the centre from the time of diagnosis. The importance of an appropriate organization in primary health care for early case finding, near-normal glycaemia, team approach, and structured collaboration with a department of ophthalmology is emphasized in order to realize the aims of the St Vincent declaration to reduce eye complications due to Type 2 diabetes.
PubMed ID
7705020 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure level and risk of major cardiovascular events and all-cause of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and renal impairment: an observational study from the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270847
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Jun;58(6):1203-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015

Characteristics and prognosis for women with hypertension in a community: results of a longitudinal study in Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56100
Source
Clin Sci Mol Med Suppl. 1976 Dec;3:649s-651s
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1976
Author
C. Bengtsson
O. Lindquist
Source
Clin Sci Mol Med Suppl. 1976 Dec;3:649s-651s
Date
Dec-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - complications
Body Weight
Female
Heart Diseases - complications
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Kidney Diseases - complications
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular
Prognosis
Sweden
Abstract
1. During the years 1968-69 a population study of 1462 women aged 38-60 years was carried out in Göteborg, Sweden. A total of 126 women were classified as hypertensive. 2. Hypertensive women reported a history of albuminuria and hypertension during pregnancy more often than women in the general population. Albuminuria, alterations of the eye-ground vessels and ECG changes indicating left ventricular strain were more often found in hypertensive women. Hypertensive women were on average heavier. 3. The same population sample was re-studied 6 years later. Two of the 126 women classified as hypertensive had died during the 6 years interval since the first examination, both from myocardial infarction. The death rate was similar to the population sample as a whole.
PubMed ID
1071699 View in PubMed
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Clinical relevance of microalbuminuria screening in self-reported non-diabetic/non-hypertensive persons identified in a large health screening--the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47400
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2003 Apr;59(4):241-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
S. Romundstad
J. Holmen
K. Kvenild
O. Aakervik
H. Hallan
Author Affiliation
HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Verdal, Norway. solfrid.romundstad@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2003 Apr;59(4):241-51
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albuminuria - complications - diagnosis
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Random Allocation
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance and consequences of screening for microalbuminuria (MA) in a randomly selected, apparently healthy population sample. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 2,113 individuals (> or = 20 years) without known diabetes and treated hypertension, all identified in the large population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) 1995-1997, (n = 65,258), delivered 3 morning urine samples for MA analysis. Those with MA, defined as at least 2 out of 3 urine samples with albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) > or = 2.5 mg/mmol, were invited to a second clinical examination. RESULTS: In total, 54 men and 54 women had MA, and 42 men (84%) and 42 women (78%) attended the second examination. All with MA had 1 or more cardiovascular risk factors, like elevated cholesterol, c-peptides and blood pressure, and they were older than those without MA. Ten men (25%) and 19 women (46%), who were defined as MA-positive at the screening, had normal albumin excretion in the overnight collected urine sample in the second clinical examination. Five men (12%) and 2 women (5%) were still followed-up at the hospital out-patient clinic 3 years later. CONCLUSIONS: Several individuals in the second examination had cardiovascular risk factors and other pathology, but the clinical benefit of discovering this was not obvious. Due to low positive predictive value and reduced reliability and validity, MA did not satisfy the criteria for a good screening test in this apparently healthy population.
PubMed ID
12708563 View in PubMed
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COPD and microalbuminuria: a 12-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260278
Source
Eur Respir J. 2014 Apr;43(4):1042-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Solfrid Romundstad
Thor Naustdal
Pål Richard Romundstad
Hanne Sorger
Arnulf Langhammer
Source
Eur Respir J. 2014 Apr;43(4):1042-50
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albumins - analysis
Albuminuria - complications - physiopathology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers
Body mass index
Creatinine - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammation
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications - physiopathology
Regression Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Spirometry
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), low lung function independent of diagnosis and markers of inflammation are all associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Microalbuminuria, reflecting endothelial dysfunction, could be a relevant inflammatory marker of potential systemic effects of COPD. We hypothesised that there was a positive association between microalbuminuria and mortality in individuals with COPD. We conducted a 12-year follow-up study of 3129 participants in the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT), Norway. At baseline, albuminuria was analysed in three urine samples and spirometry was performed. Among the participants, 136 had COPD and microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio between 2.5 and 30.0 mg·mmol(-1). The main outcome measures were hazard ratio of all-cause mortality according to microalbuminuria. Compared to those with COPD without microalbuminuria, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in those with COPD and microalbuminuria was 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.04. This result was similar after excluding cardiovascular disease at baseline. Classifying COPD severity by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, there was a positive association trend with increasing severity stages. Microalbuminuria is associated with all-cause mortality in individuals with COPD and could be a relevant tool in identification of patients with poor prognosis.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Respir J. 2014 Apr;43(4):951-324687663
PubMed ID
24435009 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.