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A 4-year review of pediatric mental health emergencies in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148300
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Amanda S Newton
Samina Ali
David W Johnson
Christina Haines
Rhonda J Rosychuk
Rachel A Keaschuk
Philip Jacobs
Terry P Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta. mandi.newton@ualberta.ca
Source
CJEM. 2009 Sep;11(5):447-54
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Humans
Infant
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
We sought to determine and compare rates of pediatric mental health presentations and associated costs in emergency departments (EDs) in Alberta.
We examined 16 154 presentations by 12 589 patients (patient age
PubMed ID
19788789 View in PubMed
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ABO-incompatible liver transplantation for critically ill adult patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163388
Source
Transpl Int. 2007 Aug;20(8):675-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Christian Toso
Mohammed Al-Qahtani
Faisal A Alsaif
David L Bigam
Glenda A Meeberg
A M James Shapiro
Vincent G Bain
Norman M Kneteman
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Section of Hepatobiliary, Pancreatic and Transplant Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Transpl Int. 2007 Aug;20(8):675-81
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - immunology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Critical Illness
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Graft Rejection - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Graft Survival
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Incidence
Liver Failure - blood - surgery
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
ABO incompatible (ABO-In) liver transplant remains a controversial solution to acute liver failure in adults. Adult liver recipients with acute liver failure or severely decompensated end-stage disease, intubated and/or in the intensive care unit, were grouped as ABO-In (n = 14), ABO-compatible (n = 29, ABO-C) and ABO-identical (n = 65, ABO-Id). ABO-In received quadruple immunosuppression with antibody-depleting induction agents (except two), calcineurin inhibitors, antimetabolites and steroids. No significant difference of patient and graft survivals was observed among ABO-In, ABO-C and ABO-Id: graft survivals were 64%, 62% and 67%, respectively, in 1 year and 56%, 54% and 60%, respectively, in 5 years; patient survivals 86%, 69% and 67%, respectively, in 1 year and 77%, 61% and 62%, respectively, in 5 years. Three ABO-In grafts were lost (one hyper-acute rejection and two hepatic artery thrombosis). Surgical and infectious complications were similarly distributed between groups, except the hepatic artery thrombosis, more frequent in ABO-In (2, 14%) than ABO-I (1, 1.5%, P
PubMed ID
17521384 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal participation in the DOVE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80691
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ralph-Campbell Kelli
Pohar Sheri L
Guirguis Lisa M
Toth Ellen L
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Practice Guidelines
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Aboriginals constitute a substantial portion of the population of Northern Alberta. Determinants such as poverty and education can compound health-care accessibility barriers experienced by Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. A diabetes care enhancement study involved the collection of baseline and follow-up data on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients with known type 2 diabetes in two rural communities in Northern Alberta. Analyses were conducted to determine any demographic or clinical differences existing between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. METHODS: 394 diabetes patients were recruited from the Peace and Keeweetinok Lakes health regions. 354 self-reported whether or not they were Aboriginal; a total of 94 self-reported being Aboriginal. Baseline and follow-up data were collected through interviews, standardized physical assessments, laboratory testing and self-reporting questionnaires (RAND-12 and HUI3). RESULTS: Aboriginals were younger, with longer duration of diabetes, more likely to be female, and less likely to have completed high school. At baseline, self-reported health status was uniformly worse, but the differences disappeared with adjustments for sociodemographic confounders, except for perceived mental health status. Aboriginals considered their mental health status to be worse than non-Aboriginals at baseline. Some aspects of health utilization were also different. DISCUSSION: While demographics were different and some utilization differences existed, overall this analysis demonstrates that "Aboriginality" does not contribute to diabetes outcomes when adjusted for appropriate variables.
PubMed ID
16967751 View in PubMed
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Absence of bias against smokers in access to coronary revascularization after cardiac catheterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176495
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2005 Feb;17(1):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Jacques Cornuz
Peter D Faris
P Diane Galbraith
Merril L Knudtson
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Source
Int J Qual Health Care. 2005 Feb;17(1):37-42
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - utilization
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cardiac Catheterization - utilization
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - utilization
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization - utilization
Prejudice
Prospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Many consider smoking to be a personal choice for which individuals should be held accountable. We assessed whether there is any evidence of bias against smokers in cardiac care decision-making by determining whether smokers were as likely as non-smokers to undergo revascularization procedures after cardiac catheterization.
Prospective cohort study. Subjects and setting. All patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada.
Patients were categorized as current smokers, former smokers, or never smokers, and then compared for their risk-adjusted likelihood of undergoing revascularization procedures (percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting) after cardiac catheterization.
Among 20406 patients undergoing catheterization, 25.4% were current smokers at the time of catheterization, 36.6% were former smokers, and 38.0% had never smoked. When compared with never smokers (reference group), the hazard ratio for undergoing any revascularization procedure after catheterization was 0.98 (95% CI 0.93-1.03) for current smokers and 0.98 (0.94-1.03) for former smokers. The hazard ratio for undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting was 1.09 (1.00-1.19) for current smokers and 1.00 (0.93-1.08) for former smokers. For percutaneous coronary intervention, the hazard ratios were 0.93 (0.87-0.99) for current smokers and 1.00 (0.94-1.06) for former smokers.
Despite potential for discrimination on the basis of smoking status, current and former smokers undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada were as likely to undergo revascularization procedures as catheterization patients who had never smoked.
PubMed ID
15668309 View in PubMed
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Abuse prevalence and victim gender among adult and adolescent child molesters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186694
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2003 Mar-Apr;26(2):179-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Scott Aylwin
Lea H Studer
John R Reddon
Steven R Clelland
Author Affiliation
Phoenix Program, Forensic Psychiatric Services, Alberta Hospital Edmonton, 17480 Fort Road, Box 307, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5J 2J7. scott.aylwin@amhb.ab.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2003 Mar-Apr;26(2):179-90
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - classification
Forensic Psychiatry
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Prisoners - psychology
Residential Treatment
PubMed ID
12581754 View in PubMed
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Access to health care among status Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154422
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2008
Author
Song Gao
Braden J Manns
Bruce F Culleton
Marcello Tonelli
Hude Quan
Lynden Crowshoe
William A Ghali
Lawrence W Svenson
Sofia Ahmed
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Date
Nov-4-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Creatinine - blood
Delphi Technique
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrology
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Ethnic disparities in access to health care and health outcomes are well documented. It is unclear whether similar differences exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease in Canada. We determined whether access to care differed between status Aboriginal people (Aboriginal people registered under the federal Indian Act) and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.
We identified 106 511 non-Aboriginal and 1182 Aboriginal patients with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). We compared outcomes, including hospital admissions, that may have been preventable with appropriate outpatient care (ambulatory-care-sensitive conditions) as well as use of specialist services, including visits to nephrologists and general internists.
Aboriginal people were almost twice as likely as non-Aboriginal people to be admitted to hospital for an ambulatory-care-sensitive condition (rate ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-2.13). Aboriginal people with severe chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-618981431
PubMed ID
18981441 View in PubMed
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Access to physician treatment for a mental disorder: a regional analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198775
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;35(2):61-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
H. Stuart
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. hh11@post.queensu.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2000 Feb;35(2):61-70
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Physicians - supply & distribution
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study examined (1) disparities in the proportion of persons who accessed a physician for treatment of a diagnosed mental disorder across 17 health regions in Alberta, Canada, and (2) the extent to which regional disparities in physician access could be explained by differences in regional demographies, population needs, or physician supply.
The study illustrates the use of ecological comparisons for regional health system performance evaluations. Regional characteristics were aggregated from four sources of data: the health insurance registry file (population denominators and regional demographies), physician claims data (treatment access), census data (social indicators of population need), and the medical directory of the College of Physicians of Surgeons (physician supply).
Regional variability in needs-adjusted measures of access to physician-based treatment services were comparatively small (varying by a factor of 1.6). Models containing adjustments for demography, need, and physician supply explained 41% of regional variation in access. Of the total variation explained, physician supply explained a smaller proportion (39%) in comparison to social demography and needs (61%). Few large regional imbalances were noted when needs-adjusted and supply-adjusted estimates were compared. Only two areas appeared to be underserviced in comparison to their local needs, reflecting approximately 6% of the provincial population.
While all three study factors proved important, findings support the broad conclusion that social demography and social risk (a proxy for need) will remain the key determinants predicting access to physician services for treatment of mental disorders in publicly funded health systems.
PubMed ID
10784368 View in PubMed
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Acetabular fractures before and after the introduction of seatbelt legislation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211432
Source
Can J Surg. 1996 Aug;39(4):317-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
S. al-Qahtani
G. O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Surg. 1996 Aug;39(4):317-20
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - injuries
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - classification - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Seat Belts - legislation & jurisprudence
Trauma Centers
Abstract
To compare the incidence and severity of acetabular fractures and associated injuries before and after seatbelt legislation.
A retrospective study.
Two major trauma centres, which are teaching hospitals.
Three hundred and ninety-three patients who sustained acetabular fractures during the 5 years before and 5 years after seatbelt legislation was enacted. Of these, the fractures in 198 patients (50.4%) resulted from a motor vehicle accident.
The number and severity of acetabular fractures and associated injuries.
There has been a significant reduction in the number of acetabular fractures (p = 0.005) since seatbelt use became mandatory, and the complexity of the fractures has decreased. There has also been a marked reduction in associated injuries, such as fractures of other bones, and head, chest and abdominal injuries (p
Notes
Comment In: Can J Surg. 1996 Aug;39(4):2668697314
PubMed ID
8697323 View in PubMed
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1147 records – page 1 of 115.