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The association between community stressors and asthma prevalence of school children in Winnipeg, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125560
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2012 Feb;9(2):579-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Tyler P Pittman
Candace I J Nykiforuk
Javier Mignone
Piush J Mandhane
Allan B Becker
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2J3, Canada. tpp@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2012 Feb;9(2):579-95
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Asthma - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Humans
Prevalence
Abstract
It is generally surmised that community stressors have an incubating effect for a variety of diagnoses on maternal and child health. This is of public health significance, as children of mothers facing long-term distress were found to have a 60% higher risk for asthma diagnosis at age 7 in Manitoba, Canada. Our objective was to determine the association of community stressors with childhood asthma prevalence in Winnipeg, Canada from participants who completed the Study of Asthma, Genes and the Environment (SAGE) survey administered in 2002-2003 to a birth cohort from 1995. Measures of community socioeconomic makeup and community disorder with rank ordinalized by quintile at the census tract level were obtained from the 1996 Canada Census. Crime data (annual incidence per 10,000 persons) by neighbourhood profile for 2001 was provided by the Winnipeg Police Service. Dichotomous caregiver report of child asthma along with other indicators from the geocoded SAGE survey allowed linkage to 23 neighbourhood profiles. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the effect of community stressors on childhood asthma prevalence for birth and non-birth home children (N = 1472) and children resident of birth homes at age 7 or 8 (N = 698). After adjusting for individual risk factors, children resident of birth homes in a high thefts over $5,000 neighbourhood profile were twice as likely (Adjusted OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.11-3.81) to have report of asthma compared to children in a lower thefts over $5,000 profile, with community thefts over $5,000 explaining over half of the observed neighbourhood variation in asthma.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22470311 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J La State Med Soc. 1996 Mar;148(3):87-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
K T Noell
Source
J La State Med Soc. 1996 Mar;148(3):87-8
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: J La State Med Soc. 1995 Oct;147(10):449-578558050
PubMed ID
8984137 View in PubMed
Less detail

Infant mortality in Alberta and all of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175534
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Mar 29;172(7):856-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2005
Author
K S Joseph
Michael S Kramer
Alexander C Allen
Reg Sauve
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Mar 29;172(7):856-7
Date
Mar-29-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Vital statistics
Notes
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2002 Jan;16(1):16-2211862950
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1998 May-Jun;89(3):188-99654805
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Oct 15;155(8):1047-528873632
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2003 Nov-Dec;94(6):463-714700248
PubMed ID
15795390 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is it possible to identify a population in which the incidence of future development of AIS is greatly increased when compared to the normal population?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166513
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;123:95-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
M. Metcalfe
A. Rajwani
R. Martin
J. Raso
K. Bagnall
Author Affiliation
Division of Anatomy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;123:95-100
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Scoliosis - epidemiology
Abstract
For future research of predictors of AIS, it would be advantageous to identify a general population in which the development of AIS is greatly increased when compared to the normal population. The probability of predicting future development of AIS among younger relatives of current patients based on the probability of AIS incidence was assessed from the research literature. Although there is considerable literature relating to familial relationships of the probability of developing AIS or having AIS, the probability is relatively low in most cases. Even with the best of predicted probabilities, the identification of patients with a high probability of developing AIS remained low. The identification of people among the general population who have a high probability of developing AIS based on the probabilities expressed in the literature is not possible.
PubMed ID
17108410 View in PubMed
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Prevalence, incidence, and characteristics of multiple sclerosis in Westlock County, Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220318
Source
Neurology. 1993 Sep;43(9):1760-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
S. Warren
K G Warren
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Neurology. 1993 Sep;43(9):1760-3
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Abstract
We report a prevalence study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the town of Westlock and surrounding county of Westlock, in Alberta, Canada. The prevalence rate for clinically definite MS on January 1, 1991, was 200/100,000. The average annual incidence rates for patients living in the area at onset were 1.91/100,000 for 1950-1959, 2.85/100,000 for 1960-1969, 3.82/100,000 for 1970-1979, and 7.26/100,000 for 1980-1989. Forty-eight percent of the patients were relapsing-remitting. Sixty percent were still walking without assistance. The female-to-male ratio was 1.4:1. Mean current age was 47, age at onset 30, and duration of illness 18 years. The majority of patients (40%) experienced multiple symptom onset. Forty percent were of single ethnic origin (primarily British); the remainder were predominantly north European combinations. Twenty-four percent of patients reported another MS relative, six first-degree and one second-degree relative.
PubMed ID
8414027 View in PubMed
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Locally acquired histoplasmosis cluster, Alberta, 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169488
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2005 Dec 15;31(24):255-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2005
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2005 Dec 15;31(24):255-8
Date
Dec-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Histoplasmosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
PubMed ID
16669121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Heart failure is an especially important problem in the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141726
Source
Heart Fail Rev. 2010 Sep;15(5):399
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Bodh I Jugdutt
Source
Heart Fail Rev. 2010 Sep;15(5):399
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Alberta - epidemiology
Heart Failure - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
PubMed ID
20686841 View in PubMed
Less detail

A prevalence study of multiple sclerosis in the Crowsnest Pass region of southern Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217614
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1994 Aug;21(3):262-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
G M Klein
M S Rose
T P Seland
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1994 Aug;21(3):262-5
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Reports of a high prevalence rate for multiple sclerosis in Southern Alberta led to an epidemiologic study of this disease in the Crowsnest Pass and Cardston regions. In Cardston, the prevalence rate for multiple sclerosis was 88 per 100,000. In the Crowsnest Pass, the prevalence rate was 217 per 100,000. Previous epidemiologic studies of the prevalence rate of multiple sclerosis in Western Canada have shown rates between 93 and 111 per 100,000. Two prevalence studies of multiple sclerosis in Barrhead County, Alberta and Westlock County, Alberta show prevalence rates of 196 and 201 per 100,000. The prevalence rate in the Crowsnest Pass is comparable to the prevalence in Barrhead County and Westlock County, Alberta. However, there is no statistically significant difference between prevalence rates in the Cardston and Crowsnest Pass regions and our overall feeling is that the results of studies of small populations should be interpreted with caution.
PubMed ID
8000983 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pediatric tuberculosis in Alberta: epidemiology and case characteristics (1990-2004).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161112
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):276-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
David Yip
Ravi Bhargava
Yin Yao
Karen Sutherland
Jure Manfreda
Richard Long
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Radiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jul-Aug;98(4):276-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Pediatrics
Registries
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Pediatric tuberculosis (TB) is important medically and indicative of a public health problem. An understanding of the epidemiology and case characteristics of pediatric TB, in a province that accepts large numbers of immigrants, can inform TB elimination strategy.
All cases of pediatric TB notified in Alberta between 1990 and 2004 were identified in the TB Registry. Individual diagnostic criteria were reviewed and case patients were related to a population grid derived from Statistics Canada censuses and population estimates of Status Indians from the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Canada. Incidence rates were determined by ethnic group and gender. Clinical/mycobacteriologic case characteristics were compared by ethnic group and birth country.
Among 124 notified cases, 95 (96 episodes) met strict diagnostic criteria: 45 Status Indians, 30 Canadian-born 'other' and 21 foreign-born. Incidence rates were much higher in Status Indians and the foreign-born compared to the Canadian-born 'other'; 10.7, 5.4, and 0.4 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Among Canadian-born 'other' cases, 12 were Métis and 11 were Canadian-born children of foreign-born parents. Compared to foreign-born cases, Canadian-born cases were more likely to have a source case in Alberta, to be detected through contact tracing, to have primary pulmonary TB, and to have a rural address.
Pediatric TB in Alberta is mainly the result of ongoing transmission in Aboriginal peoples and immigration to Canada of persons with latent TB infection. The elimination of pediatric TB will require interruption of transmission in Aboriginal peoples and prevention of disease in immigrants.
PubMed ID
17896735 View in PubMed
Less detail

A case of western equine encephalitis--Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229637
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Dec 23;15(51):256-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-23-1989

1148 records – page 1 of 115.