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An emotional and educational experience for urban migrants

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99573
Source
American Journal of Psychiatry. 124(3):381-384
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1967
Author
Leon, RL
Martin, HW
Gladfelter, JH
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Medical School, San Antonio, Texas
Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas
Source
American Journal of Psychiatry. 124(3):381-384
Date
Sep-1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaskan Indians
Behavioral sciences methodology
Bethel
Bureau of Indian Affairs, Employment Assistance Branch
Community programs
Eskimos
Seattle Orientation Center
Urban migration
Abstract
This paper illustrates how a team consisting of a psychiatrist, a sociologist, and a clinical psychologist working as consultants to a federal agency was able to develop a program which applied behavioral science theory and methods to the problem of reducing the stress of urban migration. The Seattle Orientation Center was conceived by the Bureau of Indian Affairs as a way station for Alaskan Natives en route to the large cities in the lower 48 states.
PubMed ID
6039993 View in PubMed
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Depression of tuberculin sensitivity following measles vaccination

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3402
Source
American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1964 Oct;90(4):607-611
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1964
Author
Brody, JA
McAlister, R
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
American Review of Respiratory Disease. 1964 Oct;90(4):607-611
Date
Oct-1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Alaskan Indians
Aleuts
Allergy and immunology
Eskimos
gamma-Globulins
Killed vaccine
Live vaccine
Measles Vaccine
Tuberculin Test
Abstract
The tuberculin reaction is frequently depressed following natural measles infection. Evidence also indicates that measles infection may aggravate a preexisting tuberculous condition. In a recent study, Mellman and Wetton described a temporary depression of the tuberculin reaction in children following vaccination with live attenuated measles virus vaccine. These writers stated that the depression occurred in measles-immune as well as in measles-susceptible persons but could be prevented by administering gamma-globulin simultaneously with the measles vaccine. Starr and Berkovich noted a depression in tuberculin sensitivity following the administration of live measles vaccine and gamma globulin, but stated that this occurred only in those susceptible to measles.Tuberculosis and measles are diseases of particular concern among Alaskan Indians, Aleuts, and Eskimos. Accordingly, at the Arctic Health Research Center in Anchorage, studies were initiated to confirm the above-cited observations and to extend the investigation to include the effect of killed measles virus vaccine on the tuberculin reaction. As will be seen, the data are somewhat at variance with those previously reported.
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 569.
PubMed ID
14221673 View in PubMed
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Diabetes among Alaska Natives: A review

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3105
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Dec;62(4):363-387
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
consumption and higher levels of physical activity. Observations on the prevalence and relationships among other factors in the insulin resistance syndrome are summarized. Suggestions for prevention of diabetes and further studies are presented. Keywords: diabetes, Alaska Natives, Alaskan Indian, Aleut
  1 document  
Author
Naylor, JL
Schraer, CD
Mayer, AM
Lanier, AP
Treat, CA
Murphy, NJ
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. jnaylor@anmc.org
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Dec;62(4):363-387
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
118944
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Alaskan Indian
Aleut
Complications
Diabetes
Gestational diabetes
Abstract
This review summarizes the published information on diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes among Alaska Natives. The most recently published age-adjusted prevalence was 28.3/1000 in 1998. There is evidence of a steadily increasing prevalence, documented both by cross sectional screening studies and patient registry methods. The overall incidence rates in 1986-1998 of lower extremity amputation (6.1/1000) and renal replacement therapy (2.1/1000) appear to be lower than those in other Native American populations in the United States. Incidence of stroke and MI in 1986-1998 varied widely by ethnic group and gender with Eskimo women having the highest rate of stroke (19.6/1000), and Aleut men the highest rate of MI (14/1000). The overall mortality among diabetic Alaska Native people in 1986-1993 (43.2/1000) was somewhat lower than that in other US diabetic populations, with heart disease being the most common cause of death. A high rate of gestational diabetes (6.7%) was reported in one region in 1987-88, but this appeared to decline following nutritional education intervention. In screening studies, the prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance has been found to be positively associated with body mass index and negatively associated with daily seal oil or salmon consumption and higher levels of physical activity. Observations on the prevalence and relationships among other factors in the insulin resistance syndrome are summarized. Suggestions for prevention of diabetes and further studies are presented.
PubMed ID
14964764 View in PubMed
Documents
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A survey of enteric infections among Alaskan Indians

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44923
Source
Public Health Reports. 1966 Sep;81(9):797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1966
  1 website  
Author
Fournelle, HJ
Rader, V
Allen, C
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Public Health Reports. 1966 Sep;81(9):797-803
Date
Sep-1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaskan Indians
Anvik
Arctic Village
Bacteriological examinations
Beaver (village)
Biochemical characterizations
Diarrheal diseases
Enteric survey
Environmental conditions
Fort Yukon
Galena
Holikachuk
Hudson-Stuck Memorial Hospital
Human fecal specimens
Koyukuk
Minto
Nulato
Parasitological examination
Ruby
Serologic characterizations
Shageluk
Tanana
Venetie
Virological examination
Abstract
Our survey of Alaskan Indians was similar in approach and methodology to an earlier survey among the Alaskan Eskimos. Thepurpose was to supplement prior studies of the Eskimos and to give a more comprehensive understanding of enteric disease among the Alaskan natives. Information was obtained through 1,626 household interviews and laboratory identification of bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogenic agents. A total of 389 human fecal specimens, or about 80 percent of the number collected in eight villages, were examined for viruses.
PubMed ID
4957939 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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