Skip header and navigation

Refine By

129 records – page 1 of 13.

Absence of the Asian-specific region V mitochondrial marker in Native Beringians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224068
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
G F Shields
K. Hecker
M I Voevoda
J K Reed
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks.
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1992 Apr;50(4):758-65
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Asia, Central - ethnology
Base Sequence
Chromosome Deletion
DNA Probes - diagnostic use
DNA, Mitochondrial - analysis - genetics
Far East - ethnology
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
USSR - ethnology
Abstract
The Asian-specific 9-bp deletion between the genes for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II and lysine transfer RNA has been used to trace aboriginal human movements out of Southeast Asia and into portions of the South Pacific. Although it has been used to estimate the number of independent lineages that occur in the New World, it has not been studied in native peoples of the Beringian region. Thus, we have used PCR to amplify and compare the lengths of DNA segments surrounding this deletion in native peoples of Beringia and the adjacent regions, as well as natives of the Altai Mountains of Southwestern Siberia. Of the 176 individuals analyzed here, the deletion was found in only 3 of 25 individuals from the Ust-Kan region of the Altai Mountains. We comment on the distribution of this marker and on potential relationships between Beringians and other Native American groups in which this marker has been surveyed. One Chukchi possessed three copies of the 9-bp sequence, which suggests (1) that the number of copies of this sequence in humans may be more variable than had been believed and (2) that a mechanism of replication based on tandem duplication may be a potential explanation for the origin of this length mutation in humans.
Notes
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1977 Dec;74(12):5463-7271968
Cites: Hum Hered. 1980;30(6):343-97216222
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1989 Apr;44(4):504-102929595
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1988 Oct 25;16(20):9775-873186445
Cites: Am J Phys Anthropol. 1985 Jan;66(1):1-193976868
Cites: Nature. 1984 Nov 29-Dec 5;312(5993):442-46438531
Cites: Genetics. 1992 Jan;130(1):153-621346260
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1991 Oct 1;88(19):8720-41681540
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1987 Jan 26;15(2):529-422881260
Cites: Am J Phys Anthropol. 1985 Oct;68(2):149-552998196
Cites: Hum Genet. 1986 Feb;72(2):105-173002958
Cites: Biochem Genet. 1987 Jun;25(5-6):385-903619883
Cites: Acta Anthropogenet. 1984;8(1-2):23-786085675
Cites: Genetics. 1983 Aug;104(4):699-7116311667
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1990 Mar;46(3):613-231968708
PubMed ID
1550120 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to ambulatory care for American Indians and Alaska Natives; the relative importance of personal and community resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6151
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Feb;40(3):393-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
P J Cunningham
L J Cornelius
Author Affiliation
Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Rockville, MD 20852.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Feb;40(3):393-407
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Female
Health Care Reform - standards
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Least-Squares Analysis
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The debate on health care reform in the United States has been greatly influenced by various national studies showing a strong relationship between lack of public or private health care coverage and inadequate access to health services. There is also much concern about deficiencies in the availability and delivery of services to certain population groups--especially for those living in the most remote and sparsely populated areas of the country. However, national studies have generally not demonstrated that the use of health services is strongly associated with urban/rural residence or the supply of medical providers. In this study, we show that national studies can obscure the problems of certain population groups including American Indians and Alaska Natives. Using data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, the findings show that the availability of medical providers as well as place of residence were strongly associated with the use of health care by American Indians and Alaska Natives. Although American Indians and Alaska Natives included in this study were eligible to receive health care free of charge from the Indian Health Service (IHS), financial factors were also significantly associated with use due to the use of services other than those provided or sponsored by IHS. Also, the results show that while geographic and supply factors have only modest effects on the average travel time to medical providers for the U.S. population as a whole, travel times are dramatically longer for American Indians and Alaska Natives living in rural areas and where there are few medical providers. In addition, there appear to be fewer hospitalizations in areas where there are IHS outpatient services. We conclude by discussing the need for health care reform to take into account the diversity of a large country such as the U.S., and the special needs of population groups that are usually not adequately represented in national studies.
PubMed ID
7899951 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acclimation of a non-indigenous sub-Arctic population: seasonal variation in thyroid function in interior Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214965
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Physiol. 1995 Jun;111(2):209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
M. Levine
L. Duffy
D C Moore
L A Matej
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA.
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Physiol. 1995 Jun;111(2):209-14
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Arctic regions - ethnology
Body Weight
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Pineal Gland - physiology
Seasons
Thyroid Gland - physiology
Thyroxine - blood
Triiodothyronine - blood
Weight Gain
Abstract
Total, as well as free, T4 and T3 levels were obtained over four seasons for young male infantry soldiers assigned to interior Alaska. Significant seasonal variations were found in both T3 and T4. Total T4 and T3 levels were highest in winter, while free T4 and T3 levels were highest in early spring. Correlations with melatonin levels from a concurrent study showed an association between late day (17.00) mean spot melatonin levels during the preceding summer and T3 levels in winter and spring. Differences in seasonal T4 and T3 levels between indigenous and newly arrived people in the sub-Arctic may be related not only to cold acclimation but also to light.
PubMed ID
7788348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol misuse and associations with childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban two-spirit American Indian and Alaska Native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264468
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014;11(10):10461-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nicole P Yuan
Bonnie M Duran
Karina L Walters
Cynthia R Pearson
Tessa A Evans-Campbell
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014;11(10):10461-79
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adoption - ethnology - psychology
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Alcoholism - epidemiology - ethnology
Bisexuality - psychology
Child
Child Abuse - ethnology
Female
Foster Home Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality, Female - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Male
United States - ethnology
Abstract
This study examined associations between alcohol misuse and childhood maltreatment and out-of-home placement among urban lesbian, gay, and bisexual (referred to as two-spirit) American Indian and Alaska Native adults. In a multi-site study, data were obtained from 294 individuals who consumed alcohol during the past year. The results indicated that 72.3% of men and 62.4% of women engaged in hazardous and harmful alcohol use and 50.8% of men and 48.7% of women met criteria for past-year alcohol dependence. The most common types of childhood maltreatment were physical abuse among male drinkers (62.7%) and emotional abuse (71.8%) among female drinkers. Men and women reported high percentages of out-of-home placement (39% and 47%, respectively). Logistic multiple regressions found that for male drinkers boarding school attendance and foster care placement were significant predictors of past-year alcohol dependence. For female drinkers, being adopted was significantly associated with a decreased risk of past-year drinking binge or spree. Dose-response relationships, using number of childhood exposures as a predictor, were not significant. The results highlight the need for alcohol and violence prevention and intervention strategies among urban two-spirit individuals.
Notes
Cites: Child Maltreat. 2001 May;6(2):89-10216705785
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2006 Sep;67(5):778-8416847548
Cites: J Lesbian Stud. 2006;10(1-2):125-4916873218
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Dec;96(12):2240-516670237
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007 Dec 1;91(2-3):279-8817640829
Cites: J Interpers Violence. 2008 Mar;23(3):316-3818245571
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:7018706118
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2009 Jan 1;99(1-3):280-9518929451
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S144-5119218182
Cites: Soc Work. 2009 Jul;54(3):211-919530568
Cites: Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2009 Jul;15(3):275-8419594256
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Feb;38(1):64-7019880663
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2010 Sep;39(3):291-518534807
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Oct;100(10):1946-5220075317
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Oct;100(10):1953-6020516373
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Nov;21(11):1817-2820640883
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2001 May;62(3):294-30011414338
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2002 Feb;26(2):272-911964568
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2002;117 Suppl 1:S104-1712435834
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2003 Jan-Mar;35(1):7-1312733753
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2003 Oct;25(3):238-4414507531
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Sep;64(5):727-3214572196
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Feb;28(2):131-4515003398
Cites: AIDS Educ Prev. 2004 Jun;16(3):187-20115237050
Cites: Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2004 Aug;10(3):287-30115311980
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-8048329970
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1998 May;14(4):245-589635069
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1998;8(2):24-459842064
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:22-33;quiz 34-579881538
Cites: Am J Med. 1999 Oct;107(4):332-910527034
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;62(1):99-10815630077
Cites: Addiction. 2010 Dec;105(12):2130-4020840174
Cites: J Addict Dis. 2011 Jan;30(1):63-7421218312
Cites: AIDS Patient Care STDS. 2011 Aug;25 Suppl 1:S39-4521688988
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 May;74(10):1560-922464223
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):421-722931076
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S343-924754661
Cites: AIDS Educ Prev. 2013 Feb;25(1):25-3723387949
PubMed ID
25317980 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appropriateness of the Draw-A-Person test with Alaskan Native populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223469
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1992 Jul;48(4):561-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
G. Skillman
P. Dabbs
M. Mitchell
M. McGrath
J. Lewis
C. Brems
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Anchorage.
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1992 Jul;48(4):561-4
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Female
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Personality Assessment
Projective Techniques
Psychometrics
Sex Factors
Stereotyping
Abstract
The appropriateness of the Draw-A-Person test with Alaskan Native populations was assessed by matching 33 White subjects to 33 Alaskan Native subjects, asking them to perform the DAP, and rating their performance according to eight criteria chosen for their clinical relevancy. Results indicated that neither level of commitment to Native culture nor ethnicity per se affected drawing ratings. It is hypothesized that the DAP is a useful clinical tool appropriate for use with Alaskan Native populations.
PubMed ID
1517451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic indigenous youth resilience and vulnerability: comparative analysis of adolescent experiences across five circumpolar communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268818
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):735-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Olga Ulturgasheva
Stacy Rasmus
Lisa Wexler
Kristine Nystad
Michael Kral
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;51(5):735-56
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Alaska - ethnology
Arctic regions - ethnology
Canada - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Norway - ethnology
Resilience, Psychological
Siberia - ethnology
Social Support
Abstract
Arctic peoples today find themselves on the front line of rapid environmental change brought about by globalizing forces, shifting climates, and destabilizing physical conditions. The weather is not the only thing undergoing rapid change here. Social climates are intrinsically connected to physical climates, and changes within each have profound effects on the daily life, health, and well-being of circumpolar indigenous peoples. This paper describes a collaborative effort between university researchers and community members from five indigenous communities in the circumpolar north aimed at comparing the experiences of indigenous Arctic youth in order to come up with a shared model of indigenous youth resilience. The discussion introduces a sliding scale model that emerged from the comparative data analysis. It illustrates how a "sliding scale" of resilience captures the inherent dynamism of youth strategies for "doing well" and what forces represent positive and negative influences that slide towards either personal and communal resilience or vulnerability. The model of the sliding scale is designed to reflect the contingency and interdependence of resilience and vulnerability and their fluctuations between lowest and highest points based on timing, local situation, larger context, and meaning.
PubMed ID
25217145 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of anxiety sensitivity in young American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5551
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2001 Apr;39(4):477-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
M J Zvolensky
D W McNeil
C A Porter
S H Stewart
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, West Virginia University, Morgantown 26506-6040, USA. zvolensky@aol.com
Source
Behav Res Ther. 2001 Apr;39(4):477-93
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - ethnology
Anxiety - diagnosis - ethnology
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Kansas
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
In the present study, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index [ASI; Behav. Res. Ther. 24 (1986) 1] was administered to 282 American Indian and Alaska Native college students in a preliminary effort to: (a) evaluate the factor structure and internal consistency of the ASI in a sample of Native Americans; (b) examine whether this group would report greater levels of anxiety sensitivity and gender and age-matched college students from the majority (Caucasian) culture lesser such levels; and (c) explore whether gender differences in anxiety sensitivity dimensions varied by cultural group (Native American vs. Caucasian). Consistent with existing research, results of this investigation indicated that, among Native peoples, the ASI and its subscales had high levels of internal consistency, and a factor structure consisting of three lower-order factors (i.e. Physical, Psychological, and Social Concerns) that all loaded on a single higher-order (global Anxiety Sensitivity) factor. We also found that these Native American college students reported significantly greater overall ASI scores as well as greater levels of Psychological and Social Concerns relative to counterparts from the majority (Caucasian) culture. There were no significant differences detected for ASI physical threat concerns. In regard to gender, we found significant differences between males and females in terms of total and Physical Threat ASI scores, with females reporting greater levels, and males lesser levels, of overall anxiety sensitivity and greater fear of physical sensations; no significant differences emerged between genders for the ASI Psychological and Social Concerns dimensions. These gender differences did not vary by cultural group, indicating they were evident among Caucasian and Native Americans alike. We discuss the results of this investigation in relation to the assessment of anxiety sensitivity in American Indians and Alaska Natives, and offer directions for future research with the ASI in Native peoples.
PubMed ID
11280345 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of depression with diabetes management among urban American Indians/Alaska Natives in the United States, 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262083
Source
Ethn Dis. 2015;25(1):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Elizabeth S Knaster
Amanda M Fretts
Leslie E Phillips
Source
Ethn Dis. 2015;25(1):83-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
United States
Urban health
Urban Health Services - utilization
Urban Population
Abstract
To determine the relationship between depression and diabetes management among urban American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs).
Retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of medical records.
33 Urban Indian Health Organizations that participated in the Indian Health Service Diabetes Care and Outcomes Audit.
3,741 AI/AN patient records.
Diabetes management outcomes, including HbA1c, smoking, BMI, systolic blood pressure, creatinine, total cholesterol, and receipt of preventive services.
Individuals with depression and diabetes were 1.5 times more likely to smoke than individuals with diabetes but without depression (OR=1.51; 95% Cl: 1.23, 1.86), controlling for age, sex, and facility. After adjustment, the geometric mean BMI in diabetes patients with depression was 3% higher than in patients without depression (ß=.034; 95% CI: .011, .057).
Urban AI/ANs with diabetes and depression are more likely to smoke and have higher BMI than those with diabetes but without depression. These findings inform programmatic efforts to address the care of patients with both depression and diabetes.
PubMed ID
25812257 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atherosclerosis across 4000 years of human history: the Horus study of four ancient populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115583
Source
Lancet. 2013 Apr 6;381(9873):1211-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-6-2013
Author
Randall C Thompson
Adel H Allam
Guido P Lombardi
L Samuel Wann
M Linda Sutherland
James D Sutherland
Muhammad Al-Tohamy Soliman
Bruno Frohlich
David T Mininberg
Janet M Monge
Clide M Vallodolid
Samantha L Cox
Gomaa Abd el-Maksoud
Ibrahim Badr
Michael I Miyamoto
Abd el-Halim Nur el-Din
Jagat Narula
Caleb E Finch
Gregory S Thomas
Author Affiliation
Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, and University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO 64111, USA. rthompson@saint-lukes.org
Source
Lancet. 2013 Apr 6;381(9873):1211-22
Date
Apr-6-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - ethnology
Atherosclerosis - ethnology - history
Egypt - ethnology
Female
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Male
Mummies - pathology
Peru - ethnology
Southwestern United States - ethnology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Vascular Calcification - ethnology - history
Abstract
Atherosclerosis is thought to be a disease of modern human beings and related to contemporary lifestyles. However, its prevalence before the modern era is unknown. We aimed to evaluate preindustrial populations for atherosclerosis.
We obtained whole body CT scans of 137 mummies from four different geographical regions or populations spanning more than 4000 years. Individuals from ancient Egypt, ancient Peru, the Ancestral Puebloans of southwest America, and the Unangan of the Aleutian Islands were imaged. Atherosclerosis was regarded as definite if a calcified plaque was seen in the wall of an artery and probable if calcifications were seen along the expected course of an artery.
Probable or definite atherosclerosis was noted in 47 (34%) of 137 mummies and in all four geographical populations: 29 (38%) of 76 ancient Egyptians, 13 (25%) of 51 ancient Peruvians, two (40%) of five Ancestral Puebloans, and three (60%) of five Unangan hunter gatherers (p=NS). Atherosclerosis was present in the aorta in 28 (20%) mummies, iliac or femoral arteries in 25 (18%), popliteal or tibial arteries in 25 (18%), carotid arteries in 17 (12%), and coronary arteries in six (4%). Of the five vascular beds examined, atherosclerosis was present in one to two beds in 34 (25%) mummies, in three to four beds in 11 (8%), and in all five vascular beds in two (1%). Age at time of death was positively correlated with atherosclerosis (mean age at death was 43 [SD 10] years for mummies with atherosclerosis vs 32 [15] years for those without; p
Notes
Comment In: Bull Cancer. 2013 Jul-Aug;100(7-8):656-724063025
Comment In: Lancet. 2013 Apr 6;381(9873):115723561983
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 May;10(5):24023528969
Comment In: Lancet. 2013 Jul 13;382(9887):12323849915
Comment In: Lancet. 2013 Jul 13;382(9887):123-423849914
Comment In: Lancet. 2013 Apr 6;381(9873):1165-623489749
PubMed ID
23489753 View in PubMed
Less detail

129 records – page 1 of 13.