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963 records – page 1 of 97.

The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska native children: results of a clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120452
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013

25-hydroxyvitamin D levels among healthy children in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4777
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Bradford D Gessner
Julia Plotnik
Pam T Muth
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, PO Box 240249, 3601 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine vitamin D levels among children 6 to 23 months old receiving services from Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) programs in Alaska.Study design During 2001 and 2002, we recruited 133 children receiving services at seven WIC clinics, administered a risk factor questionnaire, and collected blood. RESULTS: Fifteen (11%) and 26 (20%) children, respectively, had vitamin D levels or =25 ng/mL. Among 41 still breast-feeding children, 14 (34%) took supplemental vitamins, and six (18%) were reported to have received vitamins every day. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in Alaska. Breast-feeding in the absence of adequate vitamin D supplementation is the greatest risk factor.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):422-314571210
PubMed ID
14571215 View in PubMed
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2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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Abuse and neglect of American Indian children: findings from a survey of federal providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5117
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J M Piasecki
S M Manson
M P Biernoff
A B Hiat
S S Taylor
D W Bechtold
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - epidemiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Child abuse and neglect is of growing concern in many American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The present paper represents one attempt to add to the existing, albeit sparse, knowledge base concerning the abuse and neglect of American Indian children. It reports the results of a survey of federal human service providers in which the subject of child abuse and neglect in Indian communities figured prominently. The study took place at several locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Data were obtained using the key-informant method from 55 federal service providers who identified 1,155 children, from birth to 21 years for inclusion in the survey. Children were included if they were currently in mental health treatment, if they were in need of mental health treatment, or if they were known to have been abused or neglected. Particular emphasis was given in the data collection to abuse- and neglect-related factors such as living arrangements, familial disruption, psychiatric symptoms, substance abuse, and school adjustment. The patterns evident in this sample closely resemble those trends identified among abused and/or neglected children in the general population. Sixty-seven percent of the sample was described as neglected or abused. The presence of abuse and/or neglect was strongly related to severe levels of chaos in the family. Children who were described as both abused and neglected had more psychiatric symptoms, greater frequency of having run away or been expelled, and greater frequency of drug use.
PubMed ID
2490293 View in PubMed
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Abusive head trauma among children in Alaska: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107670
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
SCAN). State of Alaska Epidemiology Bulletin No. 6. 2008 [cited 2012 Oct 30]. Available from: http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/bulletins/docs/ b2008_06.pdf 22. Alaska Health Care Commission. Alaska's hospital dis- charge database (draft) 2011. [cited 2012 Oct 31]. Available from: h ttp://hss.state
  1 document  
Author
Jared Parrish
Cathy Baldwin-Johnson
Margaret Volz
Yvonne Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
MCH-Epidemiology Unit, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK, USA. jwp22@live.unc.edu
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Young Adult
Abstract
Serious physical abuse resulting in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been implicated as an underreported cause of infant mortality. Nearly 80% of all abusive head trauma (AHT) occurs among children
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986886 View in PubMed
Documents
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Accidental hypothermia. An Alaskan problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5765
Source
Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
R T Gregory
Author Affiliation
Arctic Medical Research Laboratory, Alaska Fort Wainwright, Alaska 99703 USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):73-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Alaska - epidemiology
Death
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Hypothermia - diagnosis - epidemiology
PubMed ID
11710085 View in PubMed
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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
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Acute appendicitis in children in a community hospital: a five year review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6823
Source
Alaska Med. 1997 Apr-Jun;39(2):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Young
K W Moss
Author Affiliation
University of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver 80262, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1997 Apr-Jun;39(2):34-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Appendectomy - adverse effects
Appendicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Hospitals, Community - economics
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Postoperative Complications
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To review appendectomy cases in children at a small community hospital and to compare with experience at larger centers. DESIGN: A five-year retrospective study. SETTING: Bartlett Regional Hospital, Juneau, Alaska. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Records of children age 14 and younger who underwent appendectomy from 1991 through 1996 were reviewed; 79 charts were found. Cases were grouped as simple appendicitis, advanced appendicitis, and appendectomy without appendicitis. Variables considered included: length of symptoms at first contact, time from onset until surgery, presence or absence of classical symptoms, post-operative complications, length of hospital stay. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: 51 cases (64.6%) of simple appendicitis, 22 cases (27.9%) of advanced disease, and 6 cases (7.6%) of normal appendix occurred. Advanced disease was high (66.7%) in children less than 5, and low (22.7%) in ages 10-14. Parental delay > 48 hours in seeking care was a significant factor in advanced disease, professional delay (time from first exam until surgery) was not. Post-surgical complications occurred in 7 (31.8%) cases of advanced disease and in none of the cases with simple appendicitis. Advanced disease cases had an average hospital stay of 8.59 days (+/-2.92) vs. 3.86 days (+/-1.46) for simple appendicitis. Review of appendicitis in children at this hospital compared favorably with the experience at larger medical centers.
PubMed ID
9254937 View in PubMed
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Acute fluoride poisoning from a public water system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35935
Source
N Engl J Med. 1994 Jan 13;330(2):95-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-1994
Author
B D Gessner
M. Beller
J P Middaugh
G M Whitford
Author Affiliation
Division of Field Epidemiology, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1994 Jan 13;330(2):95-9
Date
Jan-13-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Disease Outbreaks
Equipment Failure
Female
Fluoridation - instrumentation
Fluoride Poisoning - epidemiology - urine
Fluorides - analysis
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Acute fluoride poisoning produces a clinical syndrome characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and paresthesias. In May 1992, excess fluoride in one of two public water systems serving a village in Alaska caused an outbreak of acute fluoride poisoning. METHODS. We surveyed residents, measured their urinary fluoride concentrations, and analyzed their serum-chemistry profiles. A case of fluoride poisoning was defined as an illness consisting of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, or numbness or tingling of the face or extremities that began between May 21 and 23. RESULTS. Among 47 residents studied who drank water obtained on May 21, 22, or 23 from the implicated well, 43 (91 percent) had an illness that met the case definition, as compared with only 6 of 21 residents (29 percent) who drank water obtained from the implicated well at other times and 2 of 94 residents (2 percent) served by the other water system. We estimated that 296 people were poisoned; 1 person died. Four to five days after the outbreak, 10 of the 25 case patients who were tested, but none of the 15 control subjects, had elevated urinary fluoride concentrations. The case patients had elevated serum fluoride concentrations and other abnormalities consistent with fluoride poisoning, such as elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations. The fluoride concentration of a water sample from the implicated well was 150 mg per liter, and that of a sample from the other system was 1.1 mg per liter. Failure to monitor and respond appropriately to elevated fluoride concentrations, an unreliable control system, and a mechanism that allowed fluoride concentrate to enter the well led to this outbreak. CONCLUSIONS. Inspection of public water systems and monitoring of fluoride concentrations are needed to prevent outbreaks of fluoride poisoning.
PubMed ID
8259189 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue triglyceride fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5130
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2005 Aug;181(2):353-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Joe McLaughlin
John Middaugh
Donald Boudreau
Gray Malcom
Steve Parry
Richard Tracy
William Newman
Author Affiliation
Epidemic Intelligence Service Program, Epidemiology Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. joe_mclaughlin@health.state.ak.us
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2005 Aug;181(2):353-62
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Aortic Diseases - ethnology - metabolism
Carotid Artery Diseases - ethnology - metabolism
Comparative Study
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - metabolism
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Triglycerides - metabolism
Abstract
Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega-3 family are believed to protect against cardiovascular disease. A rich source of omega-3 PUFA is found in fish and marine mammals (seal, walrus, whale), which are a large part of the traditional diet of Alaska Natives (Eskimo, American Indians, Aleuts), a group that has been reported to have a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease than non-Natives. An autopsy study using standardized methods to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, and analyses of stored triglyceride fatty acids was conducted in a sample of Alaska Native subjects and non-Native subjects living in Alaska. Findings indicate that Alaska Natives had less advanced atherosclerosis in coronary arteries, along with higher proportions of omega-3 and lower proportions of omega-6 PUFA in adipose tissue, than did non-Natives. We conclude that high dietary intake of omega-3 PUFA may account for the lower extent of coronary artery atherosclerosis, contributing to the reported lower heart disease mortality among Alaska Natives.
PubMed ID
16039290 View in PubMed
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963 records – page 1 of 97.