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Abuse and neglect of American Indian children: findings from a survey of federal providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5117
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J M Piasecki
S M Manson
M P Biernoff
A B Hiat
S S Taylor
D W Bechtold
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 1989;3(2):43-62
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - epidemiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Child abuse and neglect is of growing concern in many American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The present paper represents one attempt to add to the existing, albeit sparse, knowledge base concerning the abuse and neglect of American Indian children. It reports the results of a survey of federal human service providers in which the subject of child abuse and neglect in Indian communities figured prominently. The study took place at several locations in Arizona and New Mexico. Data were obtained using the key-informant method from 55 federal service providers who identified 1,155 children, from birth to 21 years for inclusion in the survey. Children were included if they were currently in mental health treatment, if they were in need of mental health treatment, or if they were known to have been abused or neglected. Particular emphasis was given in the data collection to abuse- and neglect-related factors such as living arrangements, familial disruption, psychiatric symptoms, substance abuse, and school adjustment. The patterns evident in this sample closely resemble those trends identified among abused and/or neglected children in the general population. Sixty-seven percent of the sample was described as neglected or abused. The presence of abuse and/or neglect was strongly related to severe levels of chaos in the family. Children who were described as both abused and neglected had more psychiatric symptoms, greater frequency of having run away or been expelled, and greater frequency of drug use.
PubMed ID
2490293 View in PubMed
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Advancing American Indian/Alaska Native substance abuse research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121187
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):371
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Nora D Volkow
Kenneth R Warren
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. nvolkow@nida.nih.gov
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):371
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Alaska - epidemiology
Biomedical Research - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22931067 View in PubMed
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Advancing American Indian and Alaska Native substance abuse research: current science and future directions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121186
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):372-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Kathleen E Etz
Judith A Arroyo
Aria D Crump
Carmen L Rosa
Marcia S Scott
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health , Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ketz@nida.nih.gov
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):372-5
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Biomedical Research - methods - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Public Health
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) have disproportionately high rates of substance abuse yet there is little empirical research addressing this significant public health problem. This paper is an introduction to a special issue that includes cutting edge science in this research area. We identify several areas that require consideration in this field and indicate how the papers in the special issue address these gaps. These overarching areas of need, which should be considered in any substantive research, include attention to heterogeneity within the population, research that has tangible health benefits, continued work on research methods and strategies, increased focus on strength based and community oriented approaches, and the need for strong research partnerships. The special issue marks a major step forward for AI/AN substance abuse research. However, articles also highlight where more work is need to improve public health in AI/AN communities by addressing identified gap areas.
PubMed ID
22931068 View in PubMed
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The Ahalaya case-management program for HIV-infected American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians: quantitative and qualitative evaluation of impacts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2999
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
P D Bouey
B E Druan
Author Affiliation
The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center, 436 14th Street, Suite 1020, Oakland, CA 94612, USA. Paulbouey@nnaapc.org
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Case Management - organization & administration
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Hawaii - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service - standards
Abstract
The Ahalaya case management model was designed to provide culturally sensitive services to HIV-positive American Indians (AI), Alaska Natives (AN), and Native Hawaiians (NH). This program started in 1991 and expanded across the country in 1994. The evaluation plan included a client satisfaction survey, along with focus groups and key informant interviews. Of the 389 active clients enrolled, 132 responded to the anonymous 35-item questionnaire. Responses were favorable regarding benefits of the programs. Self-reported quality of life changes after enrollment also were significantly improved (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test: T=6.87, p=.000; n=131). Qualitative data highlighted other important issues. Social relationships-with staff, community, and family-were critical to client welfare, as a source of both strength and fear. While AI/AN/NH case management programs have been shown effective, services need to expand, and they have to facilitate resolutions to problems in clients social relationships.
PubMed ID
11279557 View in PubMed
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AIDS surveillance among American Indians and Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3038
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1469-1471
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
  1 website  
Author
Metler, R
Conway, GA
Stehr-Green, J
Author Affiliation
Division of HIV/AIDS, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1469-1471
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
HIV Seroprevalence
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Population Surveillance
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), we examined acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) case and seroprevalence data through December 1990. While AI/AN had a low 1990 reported AIDS case rate (4.0/100,000), the increase in diagnosed cases adjusted for reporting delays from 1989 to 1990 was higher (23.1%) among AI/AN than any other racial/ethnic group. Seroprevalence data for military applicants have documented higher rates for AI/AN than for either Whites or Asian/Pacific Islanders.
PubMed ID
1951804 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail
Source
Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):61-9, 83
Publication Type
Article

Alaska Native cancer update: incidence rates 1989-1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4041
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Sep;5(9):749-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
A P Lanier
J J Kelly
B. Smith
A P Harpster
H. Tanttila
C. Amadon
D. Beckworth
C. Key
A M Davidson
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, United States Public Health Service, United States Department of Health and Human Services, Anchorage 99501, USA.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Sep;5(9):749-51
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
SEER Program
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Five-year average annual age-adjusted cancer incidence rates for Alaska Natives (Eskimos, Indians, and Aleuts) for the most recent period (1989-1993) are compared to rates of 20 years earlier. Rates for all cancers combined increased 28 and 25% in men and women, respectively, during the 25-year interval. Increases were seen in men in cancers of the lung, prostate, and colon and in women for cancers of the lung, breast, and corpus uteri. Rates are also compared to data from the the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program for United States whites. Rates for all cancers combined in Alaska Native women are now similar to those of United States whites, whereas rates in Alaska Native men are lower than the United States, but only 10% lower. Significant site-specific differences previously reported between Alaska Natives and United States whites persist.
PubMed ID
8877067 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Public Health Rep. 2003 Nov-Dec;118(6):518-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gretchen Ehrsam Day
Anne P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Office of Alaska Native Health Research, Division of Community Health Services, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. day747@gci.net
Source
Public Health Rep. 2003 Nov-Dec;118(6):518-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Death Certificates
Disease - classification - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study compares mortality patterns for the Alaska Native population and the U.S. white population for 1989-1998 and examines trends for the 20-year period 1979-1998. METHODS: The authors used death certificate data and Indian Health Service population estimates to calculate mortality rates for the Alaska Native population, age-adjusted to the U.S. 1940 standard million. Data on population and mortality for U.S. whites, aggregated by 10-year age groups and by gender, were obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics, and U.S. white mortality rates were age-adjusted to the U.S. 1940 standard million. RESULTS: Overall, 1989-1998 Alaska Native mortality rates were 60% higher than those for the U.S. white population for the same period. There were significant disparities for eight of 10 leading causes of death, particularly unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide/legal intervention. Although declines in injury rates can be documented for the period 1979-1998, large disparities still exist. Alaska Native death rates for cancer, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes increased from 1979 to 1998. Given decreases in some cause-specific mortality rates in the U.S. white population, increased rates among Alaska Natives have resulted in new disparities. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that improvements in injury mortality rates are offset by marked increases in chronic disease deaths.
PubMed ID
14563909 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-attributable deaths and years of potential life lost among American Indians and Alaska Natives--United States, 2001--2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92278
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Aug 29;57(34):938-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-2008
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Aug 29;57(34):938-41
Date
Aug-29-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Death Certificates
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Life expectancy
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - ethnology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading preventable cause of death in the United States and has substantial public health impact on American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. To estimate the average annual number of alcohol-attributable deaths (AADs) and years of potential life lost (YPLLs) among AI/ANs in the United States, CDC analyzed 2001-2005 data (the most recent data available), using death certificate data and CDC Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) software. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that AADs accounted for 11.7% of all AI/AN deaths, that the age-adjusted AAD rate for AI/ANs was approximately twice that of the U.S. general population, and that AI/ANs lose 6.4 more years of potential life per AAD compared with persons in the U.S. general population (36.3 versus 29.9 years). These findings underscore the importance of implementing effective population-based interventions to prevent excessive alcohol consumption and to reduce alcohol-attributable morbidity and mortality among AI/ANs.
PubMed ID
18756193 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-attributable mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 1999-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104433
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S343-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Michael Landen
Jim Roeber
Tim Naimi
Larry Nielsen
Mack Sewell
Author Affiliation
Michael Landen and Jim Roeber are with the Epidemiology and Response Division, New Mexico Department of Health, Santa Fe. Tim Naimi is with the Section of Internal Medicine, Boston Medical Center, MA. Larry Nielsen is with the National Association for Public Health Statistics and Information Systems, Silver Spring, MD. Mack Sewell is with the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services, Cheyenne.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S343-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - mortality
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
We describe the relative burden of alcohol-attributable death among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in the United States.
National Death Index records were linked with Indian Health Service (IHS) registration records to identify AI/AN deaths misclassified as non-AI/AN. We calculated age-adjusted alcohol-attributable death rates from 1999 to 2009 for AI/AN and White persons by sex, age, geographic region, and leading causes; individuals of Hispanic origin were excluded.
AI/AN persons had a substantially higher rate of alcohol-attributable death than Whites from 2005 to 2009 in IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties (rate ratio = 3.3). The Northern Plains had the highest rate of AI/AN deaths (123.8/100,000), and the East had the lowest (48.9/100,000). For acute causes, the largest relative risks for AI/AN persons compared with Whites were for hypothermia (14.2) and alcohol poisoning (7.6). For chronic causes, the largest relative risks were for alcoholic psychosis (5.0) and alcoholic liver disease (4.9).
Proven strategies that reduce alcohol consumption and make the environment safer for excessive drinkers should be further implemented in AI/AN communities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24754661 View in PubMed
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241 records – page 1 of 25.