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1st Pan-Arctic Climate Outlook Forum, Ottawa, Canada, May 15-16, 2018.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297018
Source
Eskimo Walrus Commission. 15 slides.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
1st Pan-Arctic Climate Outlook Forum Ottawa, Canada May 15-16, 2018 Vera K. Metcalf Eskimo Walrus Commission D ra w in g by H en ry E lli ot t, 18 74 EWC Member Communities The Eskimo Walrus Commission (EWC) formed in 1978, is a recognized statewide Alaska Native
  1 document  
Author
Metcalf, Vera K.
Author Affiliation
Eskimo Walrus Commission
Source
Eskimo Walrus Commission. 15 slides.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1733534
Keywords
Alaska
Pacfic walrus
Conservation
Hunting
Documents

6-EWC_PARCOF1-PresMay2018.pdf

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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012 5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary 5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary 5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012)Science Conference and
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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The 6-Minute Walk Test as a Predictor of Summit Success on Denali.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279175
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2016 Mar;27(1):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Katherine M Shea
Eric R Ladd
Grant S Lipman
Patrick Bagley
Elizabeth A Pirrotta
Hurnan Vongsachang
N Ewen Wang
Paul S Auerbach
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2016 Mar;27(1):19-24
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mountaineering - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Walk Test - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
To test whether the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), including postexercise vital sign measurements and distance walked, predicts summit success on Denali, AK.
This was a prospective observational study of healthy volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 years who had been at 4267 m for less than 24 hours on Denali. Physiologic measurements were made after the 6MWT. Subjects then attempted to summit at their own pace and, at the time of descent, completed a Lake Louise Acute Mountain Sickness Questionnaire and reported maximum elevation reached.
One hundred twenty-one participants enrolled in the study. Data were collected on 111 subjects (92% response rate), of whom 60% summited. On univariate analysis, there was no association between any postexercise vital sign and summit success. Specifically, there was no significant difference in the mean postexercise peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) between summiters (75%) and nonsummiters (74%; 95% CI, -3 to 1; P = .37). The distance a subject walked in 6 minutes (6MWTD) was longer in summiters (617 m) compared with nonsummiters (560 m; 95% CI, 7.6 to 106; P = .02). However, this significance was not maintained on a multivariate analysis performed to control for age, sex, and guide status (P = .08), leading to the conclusion that 6MWTD was not a robust predictor of summit success.
This study did not show a correlation between postexercise oxygen saturation or 6MWTD and summit success on Denali.
PubMed ID
26712335 View in PubMed
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The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska native children: results of a clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120452
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013

21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin D levels among healthy children in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4777
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Bradford D Gessner
Julia Plotnik
Pam T Muth
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, PO Box 240249, 3601 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine vitamin D levels among children 6 to 23 months old receiving services from Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) programs in Alaska.Study design During 2001 and 2002, we recruited 133 children receiving services at seven WIC clinics, administered a risk factor questionnaire, and collected blood. RESULTS: Fifteen (11%) and 26 (20%) children, respectively, had vitamin D levels or =25 ng/mL. Among 41 still breast-feeding children, 14 (34%) took supplemental vitamins, and six (18%) were reported to have received vitamins every day. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in Alaska. Breast-feeding in the absence of adequate vitamin D supplementation is the greatest risk factor.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):422-314571210
PubMed ID
14571215 View in PubMed
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Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
  1 website  
Author
Hurlburt, WB
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Division of Public Health
Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Indian Health Service
Public health nurses
Sanitarium
Tuberculosis
Abstract
In the mid-20th century, Alaska Native people experienced the highest incidence of tuberculosis of any population group, ever. The crude mortality rate from tuberculosis in the Kotzebue area in the mid-1950s was three times the crude mortality rate from all causes today.
Online Resources
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50 Years Ago in The Journal of Pediatrics: Enteric Disease Due to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Hospitalized Infants in Kotzebue, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260001
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 Feb;166(2):268
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015

137 Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256245
Source
Health Phys. 1971 Jun;20(6):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971

5138 records – page 1 of 514.