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Improving firearm storage in Alaska native villages: a randomized trial of household gun cabinets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126312
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 May;102 Suppl 2:S291-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
David C Grossman
Helen A Stafford
Thomas D Koepsell
Ryan Hill
Kyla D Retzer
Ward Jones
Author Affiliation
Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. grossman.d@ghc.org
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 May;102 Suppl 2:S291-7
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Equipment Design
Female
Firearms - statistics & numerical data
Health Education - organization & administration
Household Articles - statistics & numerical data
Housekeeping - organization & administration
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Middle Aged
Ownership - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Safety - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Wounds, Gunshot - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
We determined if the installation of gun cabinets improved household firearm storage practices.
We used a wait list, randomized trial design with 2 groups. The "early" group received the intervention at baseline, and the "late" group received it at 12 months. Up to 2 gun cabinets were installed in each enrolled home, along with safety messages. In-person surveys were conducted at 12 and 18 months to determine the proportion of households reporting unlocked guns or ammunition. Direct observations of unlocked guns were also compared.
At baseline, 93% of homes reported having at least 1 unlocked gun in the home, and 89% reported unlocked ammunition. At 12 months, 35% of homes in the early group reported unlocked guns compared with 89% in the late group (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22401514 View in PubMed
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Evidence-based practices, attitudes, and beliefs in substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indians and Alaska Natives: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126318
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sandra E Larios
Serena Wright
Amanda Jernstrom
Dorothy Lebron
James L Sorensen
Author Affiliation
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Sandra.larios@ucsf.edu
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):355-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Attitude
Culture
Evidence-Based Practice - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Interviews as Topic - methods
Minority Groups - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Substance abuse disproportionately impacts American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities in the United States. For the increasing numbers of AI/AN individuals who enter and receive treatment for their alcohol or other drug problem it is imperative that the service they receive be effective. This study used qualitative methodology to examine attitudes toward evidence-based practices, also known as evidence-based treatments (EBTs) in minority-serving substance abuse treatment programs in the San Francisco Bay area. Twenty-two interviews were conducted in the study, of which seven were with program directors and substance abuse counselors at two urban AI/AN focused sites. These clinics were more likely than other minority-focused programs to have experience with research and knowledge about adapting EBTs. Only in the AI/AN specific sites did an issue arise concerning visibility, that is, undercounting AI/AN people in national and state databases. Similar to other minority-focused programs, these clinics described mistrust, fear of exploitation from the research community, and negative attitudes towards EBTs. The underutilization of EBTs in substance abuse programs is prevalent and detrimental to the health of patients who would benefit from their use. Future research should explore how to use this research involvement and experience with adaptation to increase the adoption of EBTs in AI/AN serving clinics.
PubMed ID
22400469 View in PubMed
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Design of a behavioral health program for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youths: a community informed approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126319
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Daniel L Dickerson
Carrie L Johnson
Author Affiliation
United American Indian Involvement, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):337-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - ethnology
Behavior Therapy
Child
Community Networks
Culture
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Los Angeles
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Mental health
Research Design
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) urban youths experience significant mental health and substance use problems. However, culturally relevant treatment approaches that incorporate community perspectives within the urban setting are limited. This study analyzes community perspectives from AI/AN parents, AI/AN youths, and services providers within Los Angeles County. Information gathered was utilized to develop a needs assessment for AI/AN youths with mental health and substance use problems and to design a community-informed treatment approach. Nine focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted. The Los Angeles County community strongly expressed the need for providing urban AI/AN youths with traditional healing services and cultural activities within their treatment program. However, various barriers to accessing mental health and substance abuse treatment services were identified. An integrated treatment approach was subsequently designed as a result of input derived from community perspectives. The community believed that providing urban AI/AN youths with an integrated treatment approach has the potential to decrease the risk of mental health and substance abuse problems in addition to enhancing their cultural identity and self esteem.
PubMed ID
22400466 View in PubMed
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Honoring children, making relatives: the cultural translation of parent-child interaction therapy for American Indian and Alaska Native families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126322
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):309-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dolores Subia Bigfoot
Beverly W Funderburk
Author Affiliation
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Section on Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, OUCPB 3B-2406, PO Box 26901, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA. dee-bigfoot@ouhsc.edu
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):309-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Family - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
The Indian Country Child Trauma Center, as part of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, designed a series of American Indian and Alaska Native transformations of evidence-based treatment models. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) was culturally adapted/translated to provide an effective treatment model for parents who have difficulty with appropriate parenting skills or for their children who have problematic behavior. The model, Honoring Children-Making Relatives, embeds the basic tenets and procedures of PCIT in a framework that supports American Indian and Alaska Native traditional beliefs and parenting practices that regard children as being the center of the Circle. This article provides an overview of the Honoring Children-Making Relatives model, reviews cultural considerations incorporated into ICCTC's model transformation process, and discusses specific applications for Parent-Child Interaction Therapy within the model.
PubMed ID
22400462 View in PubMed
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Persistence of hepatitis A vaccine induced seropositivity in infants and young children by maternal antibody status: 10-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126645
Source
Hepatology. 2012 Aug;56(2):516-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Umid M Sharapov
Lisa R Bulkow
Susan E Negus
Philip R Spradling
Chriss Homan
Jan Drobeniuc
Michael Bruce
Saleem Kamili
Dale J Hu
Brian J McMahon
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Source
Hepatology. 2012 Aug;56(2):516-22
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis A - ethnology - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis A Antibodies - blood
Hepatitis A Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange - immunology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - immunology
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Persistence of seropositivity conferred by hepatitis A vaccine administered to children 10 mIU/mL) at 1 month after the second dose. At 10 years, all children retained seroprotective anti-HAV levels except for only 7% and 11% of children in group 1 born to anti-HAV-negative and anti-HAV-positive mothers, respectively, and 4% of group 3 children born to anti-HAV-negative mothers. At 10 years, children born to anti-HAV-negative mothers in group 3 had the highest geometric mean concentration (GMC) (97 mIU/mL; 95% confidence interval, 71-133 mIU/mL) and children born to anti-HAV-positive mothers in group 1 had the lowest GMC (29 mIU/mL; 95% confidence interval, 20-40 mIU/mL). Anti-HAV levels through 10 years of age correlated with initial peak anti-HAV levels (tested at 1 month after the second dose).
The seropositivity induced by hepatitis A vaccine given to children
PubMed ID
22371069 View in PubMed
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The last frontier: innovative efforts to reduce colorectal cancer disparities among the remote Alaska Native population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126911
Source
Gastrointest Endosc. 2012 Mar;75(3):474-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
The last frontier: innovative efforts to reduce colorectal cancer disparities among the remote Alaska Native population Diana Redwood, MPH, MS1, Ellen Provost, DO, MPH1, David Perdue, MD, MSPH2, Donald Haverkamp, MPH3, and David Espey, MD, MPH3 1Alaska Native Epidemiology Center, Alaska Native
  1 document  
Author
Diana Redwood
Ellen Provost
David Perdue
Donald Haverkamp
David Espey
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Epidemiology Center, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. dredwood@anthc.org
Source
Gastrointest Endosc. 2012 Mar;75(3):474-80
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
472239
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Pilot Projects
Rural Health
Abstract
The Alaska Native (AN) population experiences twice the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) as does the U.S. white population. CRC screening allows early detection and prevention of cancer.
We describe pilot projects conducted from 2005 to 2010 to increase CRC screening rates among AN populations living in rural and remote Alaska.
Projects included training rural mid-level providers in flexible sigmoidoscopy, provision of itinerant endoscopy services at rural tribal health facilities, the creation and use of a CRC first-degree relative database to identify and screen individuals at increased risk, and support and implementation of screening navigator services.
Alaska Tribal Health System.
AN population.
Itinerant endoscopy, patient navigation.
AN patients screened for CRC, colonoscopy quality measures.
As a result of these ongoing efforts, statewide AN CRC screening rates increased from 29% in 2000 to 41% in 2005 before the initiation of these projects and increased to 55% in 2010. The provision of itinerant CRC screening clinics increased rural screening rates, as did outreach to average-risk and increased-risk (family history) ANs by patient navigators. However, health care system barriers were identified as major obstacles to screening completion, even in the presence of dedicated patient navigators.
Continuing challenges include geography, limited health system capacity, high staff turnover, and difficulty getting patients to screening appointments.
The projects described here aimed to increase CRC screening rates in an innovative and sustainable fashion. The issues and solutions described may provide insight for others working to increase screening rates among geographically dispersed and diverse populations.
Notes
Comment In: Gastrointest Endosc. 2012 Mar;75(3):481-322341096
PubMed ID
22341095 View in PubMed
Documents
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Network for cancer control research in American Indians and Alaska Natives: a historical perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127126
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
James W Hampton
Author Affiliation
Mercy Oncology, 11100 Hefner Pointe Drive, Oklahoma City, OK 73120, USA. james.hampton@mercy.net
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S4-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Minority Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Neoplasms - ethnology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
In the past, cancer incidence and mortality for American Indian/Alaska Native populations have been suppressed in some publications based on small numbers and racial misclassification. Regional differences in cancer incidence and mortality in Native Americans have been observed as early as 1984. The cancer incidence, mortality, and survival data for American Indian/Alaska Native population have been better documented. Good stable models for the state tumor registries for cancer surveillance exist in the New Mexico and Alaska tumor registries. The Network for Cancer Control Research in American Indian/Alaska Natives was supported by the Special Populations branch of the National Cancer Institute. The Network formulated a plan for reducing cancer incidence and mortality in Native Americans and also to improve their survival. This Strategic Plan which proposed to educate federal agencies and state agencies about the increased incidence and mortality of cancer in American Indian/Alaska Natives also informed the Native American population of the specific risks of cancer in their communities. The Strategic Plan was published and implemented by the Network, and its goals have been continued by the Spirit of Eagles.
PubMed ID
22322866 View in PubMed
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Identifying risk factors for child maltreatment in Alaska: a population-based approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134556
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):666-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Jared W Parrish
Margaret B Young
Katherine A Perham-Hester
Bradford D Gessner
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology Unit, 3601 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99503, USA. jared.parrish@alaska.gov.
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):666-73
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Birth Certificates
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Pregnancy
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Child maltreatment has been linked to multiple negative health outcomes and many leading causes of death. Statewide population-based evaluations are needed to identify high-risk populations early in life for targeted interventions.
To assess the utility of combining Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data with child protective services (CPS) records to identify risk factors associated with Protective Services Reports (PSR) suggestive of child maltreatment.
This was a retrospective population-based cohort study conducted in the spring of 2010 using weighted survey data from Alaska PRAMS for birth years 1997-1999. PRAMS responses were linked with CPS records for the sampled child. The outcome of interest was any PSR made to CPS after the survey was returned through 48 months after birth. Validation of the PRAMS data set occurred through direct comparison between the total population and PRAMS weighted sample for birth certificate factors. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to identify risk groups.
In the final multivariate model among the main effect variables, three of the top five strongest associated factors were derived all or in part from PRAMS. Public aid as a source of income had a significant interaction with Alaska Native status, and among Alaska non-Natives had an AOR of 3.37 (95% CI=2.2, 5.1). Six significant modifiable factors were identified in the multivariate model. Three quarters (75%) of the maltreatment cases occurred among children with two or more of these factors, despite being found in about one third (32%) of the total population.
Although birth certificates remained a valuable source of risk factor information for child maltreatment, PRAMS identified additional risk factors not available from birth certificates.
PubMed ID
21565660 View in PubMed
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Assessing the impacts of local knowledge and technology on climate change vulnerability in remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134649
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Mar;8(3):733-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Christopher Bone
Lilian Alessa
Mark Altaweel
Andrew Kliskey
Richard Lammers
Author Affiliation
Resilience and Adaptive Management Group, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3101 Science Circle, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. Christopher.Bone@nrcan.gc.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Mar;8(3):733-61
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Climate
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Environment
Humans
Knowledge
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Rural Population
Technology
Water supply
Young Adult
Abstract
The introduction of new technologies into small remote communities can alter how individuals acquire knowledge about their surrounding environment. This is especially true when technologies that satisfy basic needs, such as freshwater use, create a distance (i.e., diminishing exposure) between individuals and their environment. However, such distancing can potentially be countered by the transfer of local knowledge between community members and from one generation to the next. The objective of this study is to simulate by way of agent-based modeling the tensions between technology-induced distancing and local knowledge that are exerted on community vulnerability to climate change. A model is developed that simulates how a collection of individual perceptions about changes to climatic-related variables manifest into community perceptions, how perceptions are influenced by the movement away from traditional resource use, and how the transmission of knowledge mitigates the potentially adverse effects of technology-induced distancing. The model is implemented utilizing climate and social data for two remote communities located on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska. The agent-based model simulates a set of scenarios that depict different ways in which these communities may potentially engage with their natural resources, utilize knowledge transfer, and develop perceptions of how the local climate is different from previous years. A loosely-coupled pan-arctic climate model simulates changes monthly changes to climatic variables. The discrepancy between the perceptions derived from the agent-based model and the projections simulated by the climate model represent community vulnerability. The results demonstrate how demographics, the communication of knowledge and the types of 'knowledge-providers' influence community perception about changes to their local climate.
Notes
Cites: J Environ Manage. 2010 Aug;91(8):1718-2920417023
PubMed ID
21556176 View in PubMed
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5516 records – page 1 of 552.