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286 records – page 1 of 29.

Access by air: Mission Air provides vital link.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222916
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Barr
Author Affiliation
Mission Air Transportation Network, Toronto.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft - economics
Canada
Fund Raising - methods
Humans
Industry - economics
Interinstitutional Relations
Organizational Objectives
Transportation of Patients - economics - methods
Travel
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration
Abstract
Every year thousands of Canadians must travel far from home to receive specialized medical treatment or diagnosis. For many individuals, funds for air travel are limited. The Mission Air Network removes some of this stress by arranging free flights for patients and family members or escorts, using seats donated by commercial, corporate and government sponsors.
PubMed ID
10123350 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accessibility to air travel correlates strongly with increasing melanoma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16510
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Yolanda Z Agredano
Joanna L Chan
Ranch C Kimball
Alexa B Kimball
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Holidays - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sunlight
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
As the cost of air travel has decreased substantially in the USA and Europe over the past few decades, leisure travel to vacation destinations during the winter months has expanded significantly. This trend has probably increased the incidence of significant ultraviolet radiation exposure and sunburn in a broader population who could not previously afford this kind of travel. The purpose of this study was to analyse the correlation between increasing accessibility to air travel and melanoma incidence. This ecological study surveyed air travel patterns and melanoma incidence over the past three decades. Melanoma age-adjusted incidence was obtained from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 9 Registry Database, 1975-2000, and the Cancer Registry of Norway, 1965-2000. United States mean inflation-adjusted airfare prices for four airports linked to leisure destinations (Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix) were compared with melanoma incidence. Parallel analyses were performed using annual domestic passenger-kilometres and melanoma incidence in Norway. Declining United States leisure-specific airfares corresponded strongly with increasing melanoma incidence (r = 0.96, r = 0.92, P
PubMed ID
16432460 View in PubMed
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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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After Swissair 111, the helpers needed help.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202986
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Feb 9;160(3):394
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-1999

[Air ambulance services--a dangerous place of work?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103137
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Feb 22;78(3):20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1990
Author
K I Fanghol
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 Feb 22;78(3):20
Date
Feb-22-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation
Aircraft
Ambulances
Humans
Norway
Risk factors
Transportation of Patients
PubMed ID
2109895 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):263-4, 268
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P A Steen
T. Heggestad
Author Affiliation
Anestesiavdelingen, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):263-4, 268
Date
1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Ambulances
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway
Transportation of Patients - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Norway has ten bases for helicopters manned by aeromedical doctors, five for fixed-wing aircraft, and five for search-and-rescue helicopters. In 1992 there were 4,197 helicopter missions and 4,078 patients were transported by plane, figures representing 20 and 30 per cent increases, respectively, as compared with 1988. In addition, the teams used motor transport to cater to 1,699 patients at locations close to the helicopter bases. Utilisation of aero-medical services was correlated to geographic availability, and can be seen as compensating for the uneven distribution of advanced emergency medical resources.
PubMed ID
7937020 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aircraft-Assisted Pilot Suicides: Lessons to be Learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257750
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2014 Aug;85(8):841-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Alpo Vuorio
Tanja Laukkala
Pooshan Navathe
Bruce Budowle
Anne Eyre
Antti Sajantila
Author Affiliation
Mehiläinen Airport Health Centre, Vantaa and Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lappeenranta, Finland.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2014 Aug;85(8):841-6
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aircraft
Autopsy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Suicidal ideation
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Aircraft assisted suicides were studied in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Finland during 1956-2012 by means of literature search and accident case analysis. According to our study the frequency varied slightly between the studies. Overall, the new estimate of aircraft assisted suicides in the United States in a 20-yr period (1993-2012) is 0.33% (95% CI 0.21-0.49) (24/7244). In the detailed accident case analysis, it was found that in five out of the eight cases from the United States, someone knew of prior suicidal ideation before the aircraft assisted fatality. The caveats of standard medico-legal autopsy and accident investigation methods in investigation of suspected aircraft assisted suicides are discussed. It is suggested that a psychological autopsy should be performed in all such cases. Also the social context and possibilities of the prevention of aviation-related suicides were analyzed. In addition, some recent aircraft assisted suicides carried out using commercial aircraft during scheduled services and causing many casualties are discussed.
PubMed ID
25199127 View in PubMed
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Aircraft loading and freezer enhancements: lessons for medical research in remote communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156317
Source
Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug;27(4):188-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Roy Gagnon
Faith Gagnon
Constadina Panagiotopoulos
Author Affiliation
Endocrinology & Diabetes Unit, BC Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Air Med J. 2008 Jul-Aug;27(4):188-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Canada
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis
Endocrinology
Freezing
Glucose Intolerance - diagnosis
Health Services Research
Humans
Meteorological Concepts
Rural Health Services
Specimen Handling - instrumentation
Travel
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), historically extremely rare in children, is becoming prevalent among First Nations children. In Canada, many of these children live in remote villages accessible only by float plane. Because T2D has many long-term health implications, prevention and early identification are critical.
We developed a process for sending a fully equipped endocrinology team to a remote community to screen the children for T2D and IGT. Float plane (sea plane) travel has several unexpected limitations for a medical research team. These include having to travel in good visibility (visual flight rules), limited payload capacity, and restriction against transporting dry ice. The benefits include avoiding the usual security restrictions.
We developed and tested a custom-built insulation jacket and system of backup battery packs for the countertop -25 degrees C freezer (in lieu of dry ice) to transport frozen blood samples from the village to our hospital's laboratory. We also ensured that the five-member research team, its equipment, and the consumable supplies stayed within the maximum takeoff weight of the airplane and met center-of-gravity criteria to ensure a safe flight.
Using the insulated freezer, sample integrity was maintained throughout the flight, and a safe weight-and-balance trip was achieved for the team and supplies. The team obtained complete T2D screening data on 88% of children in the remote community.
PubMed ID
18603216 View in PubMed
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286 records – page 1 of 29.