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Arctic Climate Feedbacks: Global Implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300995
Source
World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), International Arctic Programme, Oslo. 97 pages..
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
among the sweeping changes being observed. The following is a brief summary of these changes that defi ne the starting point for the discussion of arctic climate feedbacks and their implications for the world. Air temperatures rising Arctic air temperatures have risen at almost twice the rate
  1 document  
Author
Sommerkorn, Martin
Hassol, Susan Joy
Source
World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), International Arctic Programme, Oslo. 97 pages..
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
11404730
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Air temperature
Sea ice
Greenland Ice Sheet
Glacier retreat
Oceans
Permafrost warming and thawing
Notes
ISBN: 9782940443000
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National Weather Service wind chill chart

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102414
Source
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
  1 document  
Author
NOAA
Source
U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
File Size
89085
Keywords
Wind chill
Air temperature
Frostbite
Abstract
Information on calculating the wind chill factor from NOAA's National Weather Service.
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Sea-surface temperature in Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait in relation to air temperature and ice cover breakup, 1985-2009

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276056
Source
Journal of Marine Systems. 2011 Jul;87(1):66-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Galbraith, PS
Larouche, P
Author Affiliation
Ocean and Environmental Science Branch, Maurice Lamontagne Institute, Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Mont-Joli Qc, Canada
Source
Journal of Marine Systems. 2011 Jul;87(1):66-78
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air temperature
Climate variability
Hudson Bay
Sea-surface temperature
Abstract
Sea-surface weekly average temperatures derived from NOAA-AVHRR remote sensing data are analyzed for the period 1985-2009 for Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait, and compared to weekly ice cover data obtained from the Canadian Ice Service for the period 1971-2009 as well as to monthly average air temperature at four stations around Hudson Bay and to four around Hudson Strait. Results show a decreasing trend in the breakup date of the sea-ice in Hudson Strait of 5.6 days per decade since 1971 as well as an interannual variability of 5°C in the Hudson Bay average SST in August between extreme years. There is good correlation in Hudson Bay between average SST in August and average air temperature anomalies at four meteorological weather stations (R2 = 0.80) and with the percentage of open water from June to August (R2 = 0.80). Climatology for SST of the warmest week of the year is presented, and the variability of different regions within Hudson Bay is discussed. One area in southwestern Hudson Bay is shown to exhibit the highest interannual variability, having nearly the warmest surface waters in some years and nearly the coldest in others. The historical observed variability of SST and ice cover is compared to expected changes in the literature that are associated with climate change.
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Solar radiation and radiant heat exchanges in Arctic regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298742
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical report TR-58-27. 24 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1960
INTRODUCTION The heat load on man depends upon a number of factors : air temperature, humidity, wind speed, and radiation. In the interior of Alaska where wind speed and humidity are low, radiation is very important to the comfort of man. The amount of radiation reaching the earth is, in turn
  1 document  
Author
Echols, Carol
Author Affiliation
Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, College, Alaska
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical report TR-58-27. 24 p.
Date
July 1960
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1267530
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Snow temperature
Air temperature
Solar radiation
Abstract
During cold and windless conditions in winter at high latitudes, it is possible that heat flow from the ground may be several times the amount of the heat received from the sun. In spite of this, the snow surface temperature is controlled principally by sky radiation and conduction from the atmosphere. The study shows good evidence that under certain conditions the snow may transmit infrared radiation.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.58-27
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The View from the Top: searching for responses to a rapidly changing Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297141
Source
United Nations Environment Programme. UNEP Year Book 2013. p.19-35.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2014
air above it. 21The View from The Top -1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 ˚C el ci us World Arctic 18 80 18 90 19 00 19 10 19 20 19 30 19 40 19 50 19 60 19 70 19 80 19 90 20 00 20 10 Figure 4: The combined sea-surface and air temperatures, globally (red) and in the Arctic
  1 document  
Source
United Nations Environment Programme. UNEP Year Book 2013. p.19-35.
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
1381844
Keywords
Arctic
Sea ice
Climate change
Air temperatures
Black carbon (soot)
Methane
Permafrost
Marine mammals
Ocean acidification
Resource development
Fisheries
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