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Aalborg, Denmark: a role model for waste management practices to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98696
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):837-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009

[An attempt to measure objectively the quality of air in schoolrooms].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110278
Source
Nord Hyg Tidskr. 1969;50(1):24-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969

Arctic nations to assess climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95967
Source
J Environ Monit. 2000 Dec;2(6):97N-98N
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000

Asbestos: scientific basis for environmental control of fibres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246326
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):737-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
E D Acheson
M J Gardner
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):737-54
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
New Jersey
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Probability
Quebec
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
Any review of the scientific evidence on which public policy is based must commence with a cautionary statement about the quality of the available data both about dust and about asbestos-related disease. Attention is drawn to some of the main problems. It is concluded that, in spite of their shortcomings, the data are sufficiently consistent to be useful in relation to some aspects of the problem of environmental control of the asbestos hazard. The question whether or not there is a threshold dose of fibre below which no biological effect occurs is of considerable importance in framing public policy. The evidence concerning the existence or otherwise of a threshold in relation to the different asbestos-related diseases is summarized. A summary is also given of the evidence about the shape of the dose-response curves for asbestos-related diseases in man. The paper concludes with a note on how scientific data may be summarized in a manner which may be helpful in formulating public policy with regard to a control limit.
PubMed ID
7228330 View in PubMed
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Assessing the impacts of changes in treatment technology on energy and greenhouse gas balances for organic waste and wastewater treatment using historical data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98881
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):861-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Tjalfe G Poulsen
Jens Aage Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. tgp@bio.aau.dk
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):861-70
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Cities
Denmark
Global warming
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Waste Management - methods - statistics & numerical data
Waste Products - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Historical data on organic waste and wastewater treatment during the period of 1970-2020 were used to assess the impact of treatment on energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances. The assessment included the waste fractions: Sewage sludge, food waste, yard waste and other organic waste (paper, plastic, etc.). Data were collected from Aalborg, a municipality located in Northern Denmark. During the period from 1970-2005, Aalborg Municipality has changed its waste treatment strategy from landfilling of all wastes toward composting of yard waste and incineration with combined heat and power production from the remaining organic municipal waste. Wastewater treatment has changed from direct discharge of untreated wastewater to full organic matter and nutrient (N, P) removal combined with anaerobic digestion of the sludge for biogas production with power and heat generation. These changes in treatment technology have resulted in the waste and wastewater treatment systems in Aalborg progressing from being net consumers of energy and net emitters of GHG, to becoming net producers of energy and net savers of GHG emissions (due to substitution of fossil fuels elsewhere). If it is assumed that the organic waste quantity and composition is the same in 1970 and 2005, the technology change over this time period has resulted in a progression from a net annual GHG emission of 200 kg CO( 2)-eq. capita(-1) in 1970 to a net saving of 170 kg CO(2)-eq. capita(-1) in 2005 for management of urban organic wastes.
PubMed ID
19767326 View in PubMed
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Biological degradation and greenhouse gas emissions during pre-storage of liquid animal manure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95871
Source
J Environ Qual. 2004 Jan-Feb;33(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Møller Henrik B
Sommer Sven G
Ahring Birgitte K
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agricultural Engineering, Research Center Bygholm, P.O. Box 536, DK-8700 Horsens, Denmark. Henrikb.moller@agrsci.dk
Source
J Environ Qual. 2004 Jan-Feb;33(1):27-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - chemistry
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Animals
Bioreactors
Cattle
Greenhouse Effect
Manure - analysis
Methane - chemistry
Swine
Temperature
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Abstract
Storage of manure makes a significant contribution to global methane (CH4) emissions. Anaerobic digestion of pig and cattle manure in biogas reactors before outside storage might reduce the potential for CH4 emissions. However, manure pre-stored at 15 to 20 degrees C in buildings before anaerobic digestion may be a significant source of CH4 and could reduce the potential CH4 production in the biogas reactor. Degradation of energy-rich organic components in slurry and emissions of CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) from aerobic and anaerobic degradation processes during pre-storage were examined in the laboratory. Newly mixed slurry was added to vessels and stored at 15 and 20 degrees C for 100 to 220 d. During storage, CH4 and CO2 emissions were measured with a dynamic chamber technique. The ratio of decomposition in the subsurface to that at the surface indicated that the aerobic surface processes contributed significantly to CO2 emission. The measured CH4 emission was used to calculate the methane conversion factor (MCF) in relation to storage time and temperature, and the total carbon-C emission was used to calculate the decrease in potential CH4 production by anaerobic digestion following pre-storage. The results show substantial methane and carbon dioxide production from animal manure in an open fed-batch system kept at 15 to 20 degrees C, even for short storage times, but the influence of temperature was not significant at storage times of
PubMed ID
14964355 View in PubMed
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Carbon prices and incentives for technological development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266280
Source
J Environ Manage. 2015 Mar 1;150:393-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2015
Author
Tommy Lundgren
Per-Olov Marklund
Eva Samakovlis
Wenchao Zhou
Source
J Environ Manage. 2015 Mar 1;150:393-403
Date
Mar-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Economic development
Humans
Industrial Waste - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Models, Theoretical
Paper
Sweden
Taxes
Abstract
There is concern that the carbon prices generated through climate policies are too low to create the incentives necessary to stimulate technological development. This paper empirically analyzes how the Swedish carbon dioxide (CO2) tax and the European Union emission trading system (EU ETS) have affected productivity development in the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1998-2008. A Luenberger total factor productivity (TFP) indicator is computed using data envelopment analysis. The results show that climate policy had a modest impact on technological development in the pulp and paper industry, and if significant it was negative. The price of fossil fuels, on the contrary, seems to have created important incentives for technological development. Hence, the results suggest that the carbon prices faced by the industry through EU ETS and the CO2 tax have been too low. Even though the data for this study is specific for Sweden, the models and results are applicable internationally. When designing policy to mitigate CO2 emissions, it is vital that the policy creates a carbon price that is high enough - otherwise the pressure on technological development will not be sufficiently strong.
PubMed ID
25560661 View in PubMed
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[Certain results of silicosis control at a Dinas plant].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253423
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1974 Jun;18(6):35-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1974

Characterization and control of terpene emissions in Finnish sawmills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194853
Source
AIHAJ. 2001 Mar-Apr;62(2):172-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
I. Welling
T. Mielo
J. Räisänen
M. Hyvärinen
T. Liukkonen
T. Nurkka
P. Lonka
C. Rosenberg
Y. Peltonen
U. Svedberg
P. Jäppinen
Author Affiliation
Lappeenranta Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Laserkatu 6, FIN-53850, Lappeenranta, Finland.
Source
AIHAJ. 2001 Mar-Apr;62(2):172-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Finland
Humans
Industry
Seasons
Terpenes - analysis
Wood
Abstract
This article describes an experimental study of terpene emission rates during fresh pine and spruce sawing and processing. Total terpene emission was determined by summing the product of the exhaust airflow rate and the mean concentration in the exhaust. Terpene concentrations were measured at fixed sampling points between the sawing lines. Terpene emission during pine sawing was found to be around 10 times greater than that during spruce sawing. The emission rates given here can be used to predict emission rates for various production rates. The predicted emission rates can be used in mass balance models to predict concentrations or required airflow rates to achieve the target concentration level.
PubMed ID
11331989 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.