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Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
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Adverse health reactions in skin, eyes, and respiratory tract among dental personnel in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15729
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Latex
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Permeability
Polymers - adverse effects - chemistry
Prevalence
Resins, Synthetic - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Compounds
Volatilization
Abstract
Dental personnel manually handle products that contain monomers. Several studies have documented adverse health effects after exposure to such products. Gloves made of vinyl or latex are easily penetrated by monomers. Ordinary glasses, or visors, do not protect against vapour from polymer products. Dental face masks filter out about 40% of respirable particles. To survey the prevalence of asthma, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, hay fever/rhinitis, and hand eczema among dental personnel, a questionnaire was distributed to all dental teams in Northern Sweden. Referents were researchers, teachers, and secretaries from the same geographical area. The response rate was 76% for dental teams, and 66% for referents. The results show a significantly higher prevalence of conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis among dentists, both male and female. Hypersensitivity to dental materials was reported by significantly more dental personnel than by referents.
PubMed ID
9646391 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution and the prevalence of bronchial asthma among the pediatric population of Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216508
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(5):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B A Revich
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(5):15-9
Date
1995
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Humans
Moscow - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The article presents results of descriptive epidemiologic study of bronchial asthma among children in Moscow where the incidence is steadily growing. Since 1947 average prevalence of bronchial asthma in Moscow has increased over 7 times, being considerably uneven over the territory. The average prevalence equals 6.9/1,000, but on 56% of the territory it is double higher. Sites of the higher occurrence are localized in the living area situated near the Zoo, horse races, perfume factory and other enterprises, near major automobile roads. Statistic analysis of the prevalence if correlated with concentrations of pollutants in the air proved that nitrogen oxides induce 60% of the cases. No differences in some risk factors (heredity, living conditions, etc.) were revealed by the poll among families of the ailing children residing in the districts with variable air pollution. The results helped to restructure pediatric allergologic service in the city.
PubMed ID
7663848 View in PubMed
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[Ambient air benz[a]pyrene and cancer morbidity in Kemerovo].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166782
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Jul-Aug;(4):28-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
S A Mun
S A Larin
V V Brailovskii
A F Lodzia
S F Zinchuk
A N Glushkov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Jul-Aug;(4):28-30
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Benzopyrenes - analysis
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A statistically significant direct strong correlation was found between the annual average daily concentrations of air benz[a]pyrene and the lung and the gastric cancer morbidity rates in males and females, skin, thyroid, and ovarian cancer in females. The certain interval of the measured concentration of benz[a]pyrene and the recorded morbidity rate was shown to be characteristic of each of the above-mentioned tumors.
PubMed ID
17078289 View in PubMed
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Aspirin-intolerant asthma in the population: prevalence and important determinants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266365
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
J. Eriksson
L. Ekerljung
A. Bossios
A. Bjerg
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
J. Lötvall
B. Lundbäck
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 Jan;45(1):211-9
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma, Aspirin-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Occupational Exposure
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Population-based studies on aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) are very few, and no previous population study has investigated risk factors for the condition.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of AIA in the general population.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed to 30,000 randomly selected subjects aged 16-75 years in West Sweden, 29,218 could be traced and 18,087 (62%) responded. The questionnaire included questions on asthma, respiratory symptoms, aspirin-induced dyspnoea and possible determinants.
The prevalence of AIA was 0.5%, 0.3% in men and 0.6% in women (P = 0.014). Sick leave, emergency visits due to asthma and all investigated lower respiratory symptoms were more common in AIA than in aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA). Obesity was a strong risk factor for AIA (BMI > 35: odds ratio (OR) 12.1; 95% CI 2.49-58.5), and there was a dose-response relationship between increasing body mass index (BMI) and risk of AIA. Obesity, airborne occupational exposure and visible mould at home were considerably stronger risk factors for AIA than for ATA. Current smoking was a risk factor for AIA (OR 2.55; 95% CI 1.47-4.42), but not ATA.
Aspirin-intolerant asthma identified in the general population was associated with a high burden of symptoms, uncontrolled disease and a high morbidity. Increasing BMI increased the risk of AIA in a dose-response manner. A number of risk factors, including obesity and current smoking, were considerably stronger for AIA than for ATA.
PubMed ID
24961377 View in PubMed
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[Assessing the relationship between the air pollution and incidence of respiratory diseases in the Primor'e territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190957
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 Jan-Feb;(1):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
P F Kiku
L V Veremchuk
L A Belik
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 Jan-Feb;(1):19-22
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of respiratory diseases in the Primorye territory is discussed. Ecological risk of air pollution effects on respiratory morbidity is estimated. High ecological risk of respiratory diseases in the cities of the region is determined by car transport waste discharge. Children and adolescents are more sensitive to air pollution and more often suffer from respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11899861 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of the relationship between isocyanate exposure levels and occupational asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207422
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Nov;32(5):517-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
S M Tarlo
G M Liss
C. Dias
D E Banks
Author Affiliation
Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. susan.tarlo@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Nov;32(5):517-21
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Industry - classification
Insurance Claim Review
Isocyanates - adverse effects - analysis
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
As part of a previous study, we identified Ontario cases of isocyanate-induced occupational asthma (OA) and the companies at which they worked. The Ontario Ministry of Labour maintained a computerized database including isocyanate air sampling determinations conducted by the Ministry. Within this database, we compared levels of isocyanate concentrations measured at 20 case companies [with compensated isocyanate asthma (OA) claims] with 203 noncase companies, based on air samples collected during the same 4-year period during which the OA claims arose. The proportion of case companies that were ever recorded as having a measured ambient isocyanate concentration of > or = 0.005 ppm was greater than that for noncase companies, for TDI users (43% vs 22%), and for MDI users (40% vs 27%). This reached conventional significance when combined across companies and isocyanate types (50% vs 25%; P
PubMed ID
9327076 View in PubMed
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The association between chronic exposure to traffic-related air pollution and ischemic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125025
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2012;75(7):402-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Bernardo S Beckerman
Michael Jerrett
Murray Finkelstein
Pavlos Kanaroglou
Jeffrey R Brook
M Altaf Arain
Malcolm R Sears
David Stieb
John Balmes
Kenneth Chapman
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-7360, USA. beckerman@berkeley.edu
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2012;75(7):402-11
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Myocardial Ischemia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Ontario - epidemiology
Oxidants, Photochemical - analysis - toxicity
Ozone - analysis - toxicity
Particulate Matter - analysis - toxicity
Poisson Distribution
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Abstract
Increasing evidence links air pollution to the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the association between ischemic heart disease (IHD) prevalence and exposure to traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxide [NO2], fine particulate matter [PM2.5], and ozone [O3]) in a population of susceptible subjects in Toronto. Local (NO2) exposures were modeled using land use regression based on extensive field monitoring. Regional exposures (PM2.5, O3) were modeled as confounders using inverse distance weighted interpolation based on government monitoring data. The study sample consisted of 2360 patients referred during 1992 to 1999 to a pulmonary clinic at the Toronto Western Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, to diagnose or manage a respiratory complaint. IHD status was determined by clinical database linkages (ICD-9-CM 412-414). The association between IHD and air pollutants was assessed with a modified Poisson regression resulting in relative risk estimates. Confounding was controlled with individual and neighborhood-level covariates. After adjusting for multiple covariates, NO2 was significantly associated with increased IHD risk, relative risk (RR) = 1.33 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2, 1.47). Subjects living near major roads and highways had a trend toward an elevated risk of IHD, RR = 1.08 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.18). Regional PM2.5 and O3 were not associated with risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
22524595 View in PubMed
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Asthma and allergy among schoolchildren in a mountainous, dry, non-polluted area in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15592
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2000 Feb;11(1):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
F. Njå
O D Røksund
B. Svidal
W. Nystad
K H Carlsen
Author Affiliation
Geilomo Children's Hospital for Asthma and Allergy, Geilo and Sandvika, Norway.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2000 Feb;11(1):40-8
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Altitude
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Climate
Eczema - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Skin Tests
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of asthma and allergy in the non-polluted mountain area of Upper Hallingdal, Norway. All schoolchildren (7-16 years) who in a previous questionnaire survey (n = 1177) reported 'sometime' asthma were enrolled in group I (n = 80), the 59 who reported asthma-like symptoms in the past 12 months formed group II, and 77 of the healthy controls were randomly selected as group III. All 216 children underwent clinical examination, skin prick test, spirometry, bronchial provocation (PD20 metacholine) and treadmill exercise test. Subsequently they were reclassified as (1) healthy, never had asthma or symptoms, (2) symptoms not confirmed as asthma, (3) previous asthma, now healthy, (4) current asthma. Lifetime asthma prevalence was 10.2%. Based upon clinical examination, the specificity and sensitivity of the questionnaire for asthma diagnosis were 88 and 74%, respectively. Forced vital capacity was significantly higher among the asthmatics (group 4 versus 1), whereas forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity were similar in all groups. More than 10% reduction in FEV1 following treadmill-run was found in 20% of children. Children with current asthma compared to controls had significantly; lower mean values of PD20 (9.1 versus 16.5 micromol), higher eosinophil cationic protein (13.4 versus 7.7 micromol) and more frequent sensitization to animal dander (56% versus 10%). In conclusion, despite a favorable climate, little mite sensitization and low outdoor pollution, asthma prevalence was surprisingly high in Upper Hallingdal. Sensitization to animal dander was the most important contributing factor for current asthma.
PubMed ID
10768734 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.