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Adult asthma and traffic exposure at residential address, workplace address, and self-reported daily time outdoor in traffic: A two-stage case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139159
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:716
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anna Lindgren
Jonas Björk
Emilie Stroh
Kristina Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Sweden. anna.lindgren@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:716
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation
Young Adult
Abstract
Most epidemiologic studies use traffic at residential address as a surrogate for total traffic exposure when investigating effects of traffic on respiratory health. This study used GIS (Geographical Information Systems) to estimate traffic exposure, not only on residential, but also on workplace address, in addition to survey questions on time spent in traffic during commuting or other daily activities.The aim was to investigate 1) if there is an association between traffic exposure and prevalence of adult asthma and asthma symptoms, and 2) if so, does this association become stronger using more complete traffic exposure information.
This study was conducted in two stages: A first cross-sectional survey in Southern Sweden 2004 (n = 24819, 18-80 years, response rate 59%) was followed by a case-control study in 2005 to obtain more detailed exposure and confounder information (n = 2856, asthmatics and controls (1:3), 86% response rate). In the first survey, only residential address was known. In the second survey, questions about workplace addresses and daily time spent in traffic were also included. Residential and workplace addresses were geocoded and linked with GIS to road data and dispersion modelled outdoor concentrations of NOx (annual mean, 250 × 250 m resolution).
Living within 50 m of a road (measured by GIS) with traffic intensity of >10 cars/minute (compared with no road within this distance) was associated with an increased prevalence of asthma, (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = (1.1-2.8), and with asthma symptoms last 12 months. No statistically significant effects were seen for traffic exposure at workplace address, daily time spent in traffic, or commuting time to work, after adjustment for confounders. A combined total exposure estimate did not give a stronger association with asthma prevalence or asthma symptoms.
Traffic exposure at close proximity to residential address showed association with asthma prevalence and asthma symptoms last 12 months, among adults in southern Sweden. The associations were not stronger when accounting for total traffic exposure. This could reflect exposure misclassfication at workplace address and for other daily time in traffic, but also that residential address remains the main determinant for traffic exposure among adults.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21092159 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily ED visits for migraine and headache in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150066
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2009 May;27(4):391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
David M Stieb
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A OK9. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2009 May;27(4):391-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Alberta - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Weather
Abstract
A variety of environmental factors have been identified as possible triggers for migraine and other headache syndromes.
We analyzed associations between air pollution and emergency department (ED) visits for migraine and headache.
Analysis was based on 56,241 ED visits for migraine and 48,022 ED visits for headache to Edmonton hospitals between 1992 and 2002. A Poisson model of counts hierarchically clustered by day of week, month, and year was applied using generalized linear mixed models. Temperature and relative humidity were included as covariates.
Females accounted for 78.5% of migraine visits and 56.3% of headache visits. An interquartile range (IQR) increase (6.2 microg/m3) in daily average particulate matter of median aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) was associated with increases in visits of 3.3% for migraine (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.6-6.0), lagged 2 days, and 3.4% for headache (95% CI: 0.3-6.6), lagged 0 days, among females in the cold season (October-March). PM2.5 was also associated with cold season migraine visits among females at lag 0 and 1 day (P
PubMed ID
19555607 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for chest pain and weakness in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143778
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian Rowe
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Chest Pain - chemically induced
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - chemically induced
Female
Humans
Humidity
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Temperature
Young Adult
Abstract
Chest pain or weakness can be first signal of health problems. Many studies demonstrate that these conditions can be related to air pollution. This work uses time-series data to investigate the association.
This is a study of 68,714 emergency department (ED) visits for chest pain (ICD-9: 786) and of 66,092 ED visits for weakness (ICD-9: 780). The hierarchical method was applied to analyse the associations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain and weakness (separately) and the levels of the air pollutants and meteorological variables. The counts of visits for all patients, males and females were analysed separately by whole period (I-XII), warm (IV-IX) and cold (X-III).
The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the interquartile range (IQR) for the pollutant. Chest pain: 2.4% (95% CI: 1.0-3.9) for CO, females, I-XII; 3.8% (95% CI: 0.0-7.8) for NO(2), males, IV-IX; 4.5% (95% CI: 0.9-8.3) for O(3) (1-day lagged), males, IV-IX; 2.8% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2), for PM(10), males, X-III; 2.0% (95% CI: 0.0-4.0), for SO(2), females, X-III; 2.1% (95% CI: 0.2-4.0) for PM(2.5), all, X-III. Weakness: 2.1% (95% CI: 0.4-3.7) for CO (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 3.4% (95% CI: 1.0-5.9) for NO(2) (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 2.4% (95% CI: 0.9-3.9) for SO(2), females, I-XII; 4.6% (95% CI: 1.0-8.2) for O(3) (1-day lagged), females, IV-IX.
Obtained findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for chest pain and weakness are associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
20442058 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for depression in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160867
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):241-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):241-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Databases as Topic
Depression
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Temperature
Abstract
Depression is a common cause of morbidity. Sufferers are very sensitive to many external factors. Emergency department (ED) visits for this condition can be associated with the concentration of ambient air pollutants. The study objective was to examine and assess the associations between ED visits for depression and ambient air pollution.
The present study analyzed 15,556 ED visits for depression (ICD-9: 311) at Edmonton hospitals between 1992 and 2002. The data were clustered based on the triplet {year, month, day of the week}. The generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) technique was used to regress the logarithm of the clustered counts for ED visits for depression on the levels of air pollutants (CO, NO2, SO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5) and the meteorological variables. The number of ED visits for depression was analyzed separately for all patients, and males and females. An analysis by season was also conducted: for the whole year (I-XII), warm season (IV-IX), and cold season (X-III).
After adjusting for temperature and relative humidity, the following increments in daily depression-related ED visits could be noted: 6.9% (95% CI: 1.3, 12.9) for carbon monoxide (CO) for all patients in warm season; 7.4% (95% CI: 0.5, 14.8) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for female patients in warm season; 4.5% (95% CI: 0.1, 9.1) for sulphur dioxide (SO2) for female patients in warm season; 6.9% (95% CI: 0.6, 13.6) for ground level ozone (O3, 1-day lagged) for female patients in warm season; 7.2% (95% CI: 2.7, 12.0) for particulate matter (PM10) for females in cold season; and 7.2% (95% CI: 2.0, 12.8) for particulate matter (PM2.5) for females in cold season.
The findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for depression are associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
17932013 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for ischemic heart disease in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162394
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(2):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(2):167-73
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - toxicity
Cluster analysis
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We examined the associations between emergency department (ED) visits for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and short-term elevations in ambient air pollutants (CO and NO(2)).
A hierarchical clusters design was used to study ED visits (n = 4979) for ischemic heart disease (ICD-9: 410-414) that occurred at a Montreal hospital between 1997 and 2002. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to create Poisson models for the clustered counts of ED visits for IHD. The analysis was done by gender for two age categories, all patients and patients aged over 64 years.
The results are presented as an excess risk increase associated with the interquartile range (IQR) of daily average of the pollutant concentration. The results for NO(2) (IQR = 9.5 ppb) were 5.9% (95% CI: 2.1-9.9) for all patients and 6.2% (95% CI: 1.2-11.4) for males; for patients aged over 64: 7.1% (95% CI: 2.5-11.9) for all patients, 9.1% (95% CI: 2.8-15.7) for males, and 6.5% (95% CI: 0.7-12.7) for females (for exposure lagged by 1-day). The results for CO (IQR = 0.2 ppm): 5.4% (95% CI: 2.3-8.5) for all patients, and 7.5% (95% CI: 3.6-11.6) for males. For patients aged over 64 years, 4.9% (95% CI: 1.3-8.7) for all patients, and 7.5% (95% CI: 2.6-12.6) for males. The results show the associations for the same day exposures.
The short-term effects of nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide are associated significantly with daily ED visits for ischemic heart disease. For NO(2) the associations are stronger for patients aged over 64 years. As indicated by our results, it is likely that vehicular traffic, a producer of NO(2) and CO, contributes to an increased number of ED visits for IHD.
PubMed ID
17638683 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic and risk for brain tumors: a nationwide study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277407
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2016 Apr;27(4):473-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Aslak Harbo Poulsen
Mette Sørensen
Zorana J Andersen
Matthias Ketzel
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2016 Apr;27(4):473-80
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Young Adult
Abstract
Air pollution is an established lung carcinogen, and there is increasing evidence that air pollution also negatively affects the brain. We have previously reported an association between air pollution and risk of brain tumors in a cohort study based on only 95 cases. We set out to replicate that finding in a large nationwide case-control study.
We identified all 4,183 adult brain tumor cases in Denmark in the years 2000-2009 and 8,018 risk set sampled population controls matched on gender and year of birth. We extracted residential address histories and estimated mean residential nitrogen oxides (NO x ) concentrations since 1971 with a validated dispersion model. Categorical and linear odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were calculated with conditional logistic regression models.
The highest risk estimates for any brain cancer were observed among subjects with the highest average exposure levels (80-99 ?g/m(3): OR 1.27, 95% CI 0.82-1.96; =100 ?g/m(3): 1.40, 95 % CI 0.87-2.26 as compared to
PubMed ID
26892605 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic and risk for lung cancer in three Danish cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99386
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Helle Bak
Mette Sørensen
Steen Solvang Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Martin Hvidberg
Peter Schnohr
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Steffen Loft
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Air pollution is suspected to cause lung cancer. The purpose was to investigate whether the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the residence, used as an indicator of air pollution from traffic, is associated with risk for lung cancer. METHODS: We identified 679 lung cancer cases in the Danish Cancer Registry from the members of three prospective cohorts and selected a comparison group of 3,481 persons from the same cohorts in a case-cohort design. Residential addresses from January 1, 1971, were traced in the Central Population Registry. The NOx concentration at each address was calculated by dispersion models, and the time-weighted average concentration for all addresses was calculated for each person. We used Cox models to estimate incidence rate ratios after adjustment for smoking (status, duration, and intensity), educational level, body mass index, and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The incidence rate ratios for lung cancer were 1.30 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.07-1.57] and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.88) for NOx concentrations of 30 to 72 and >72 microg/m3, respectively, when compared with
PubMed ID
20447920 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution and daily emergency department visits for asthma in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157250
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2008;21(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Environmental Health Science Bureau, Health Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2008;21(1):25-30
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Alberta
Asthma
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Humidity
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Temperature
Abstract
As demonstrated by many studies, emergency department (ED) visits for asthma can be associated with air pollution exposures. The aim of this study was to examine and assess the potential relations between ED visits for asthma and the concentrations of ambient air pollutants.
Generalized linear mixed model was applied to study 62,563 ED visits for asthma (ICD-9: 493) in Edmonton, Canada. Two age groups, with 10 years of age as a separator, were considered by gender and season of the year: all (I-XII), warm (IV-IX) and cold (X-III).
The percentage increase in daily ED visits for asthma was 17.8% (95% CI: 7.1-29.5) and 13.8% (95% CI: 3.3-25.3) for females below 10 years of age, in the period of IV-IX, for current day and 1-day lagged exposure to ozone (O(3)), respectively. The percentage increase was 19.2% (95% CI: 11.4-27.6) for males below 10 years of age, in the period of IV-IX, for 2-day lagged exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)).
The findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for asthma are associated with exposure to O(3). This study underlines the significant role of air pollutants as triggering asthma attacks.
PubMed ID
18468973 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution and daily emergency department visits for headache in Ottawa, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159167
Source
Headache. 2008 Jul;48(7):1076-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
Headache. 2008 Jul;48(7):1076-81
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - trends
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Seasons
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
No extensive studies exist on the relation between ambient air pollution and health outcomes such as migraine or headache. From other side, existing publications indicated that air pollutants can trigger migraine or headache.
To examine associations between emergency department (ED) visits for headache and environmental conditions: ambient air pollution concentrations adjusted for weather factors (atmospheric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity).
This is a time-series study of 8012 ED visits for headache (International Classification for Diseases ninth revision: 784) recorded at an Ottawa hospital between 1992 and 2000. The generalized linear mixed models technique is used to model relation between daily counts of ED visits for headache and ambient air pollutants (gases: sulphur dioxide [SO(2)], nitrogen dioxide [NO(2)], carbon monoxide [CO]). The counts of visits for all patients, male and female patients, are analyzed separately.
The percentage increase in daily ED visits for headache was 4.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 6.4) and 4.9% (95% CI: 1.2, 8.8) for 1-day and 2-day lagged exposure to SO(2) for an increase in the interquartile range (IQR, IQR = 3.9 ppb). The positive statistically significant associations were also observed for exposure to NO(2) and CO for all and male ED visits for headache.
Presented findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for headache are related to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
18218009 View in PubMed
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Ambient sulphur dioxide exposure and emergency department visits for migraine in Vancouver, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151800
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2009;22(1):7-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Gilaad G Kaplan
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2009;22(1):7-12
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - chemically induced
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sulfur Dioxide - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
Ambient exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) has been previously associated with emergency department (ED) visits for migraine headaches. In the present study, the objective was to examine the relationship between ED visits for migraine and ambient sulphur dioxide concentrations.
This was a time-series study of 1059 ED visits for migraine (ICD-9: 346) recorded at a Vancouver hospital between 1999 and 2003 (1 520 days). Air pollution levels of SO2 were measured by fixed-site monitoring stations. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to regress daily counts of ED visits for migraine on the levels of the pollutant after adjusting for meteorological conditions: temperature and relative humidity. The analysis was stratified by season and gender.
Positive and statistically significant correlations were observed for SO2 exposure and ED visits for migraine for females during colder months (October-March). The percentage increase in daily visits was 16.8% (95% CI: 1.2-34.8) for a 4-day average (of daily mean concentrations) SO2 level, for an interquartile range (IQR) increase of 1.9 ppb.
Our findings provide additional support for a consistent correlation between migraine headache and air pollution (SO2).
PubMed ID
19329386 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.