Skip header and navigation

Refine By

665 records – page 1 of 67.

Absenteeism and respiratory disease among children and adults in Helsinki in relation to low-level air pollution and temperature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228944
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
A. Pönkä
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Health Department, Finland.
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Cold Temperature
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Infant
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Urban health
Abstract
The weekly changes in ambient sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and temperature were compared with the figures for respiratory infection in children and adults and for absenteeism from day-care centers (DCC), schools, and workplaces during a 1-year period in Helsinki. The annual average level of sulfur dioxide was 21 micrograms/m3 and of nitrogen dioxide 47 micrograms/m3; the average temperature was +3.1 degrees C. The levels of these pollutants and the temperature were significantly correlated with the number of upper respiratory infections reported from health centers. Low temperature also correlated with increased frequency of acute tonsillitis, of lower respiratory tract infection among DCC children, and of absenteeism from day-care centers, schools and workplaces. Furthermore, a significant association was found between levels of sulfur dioxide and absenteeism. After statistical standardization for temperature, no other correlations were observed apart from that between high levels of sulfur dioxide and numbers of upper respiratory tract infections diagnosed at health centers (P = 0.04). When the concentrations of sulfur dioxide were above the mean, the frequency of the upper respiratory tract infections was 15% higher than that during the periods of low concentration. The relative importance of the effects of low-level air pollution and low temperature on health is difficult to assess.
PubMed ID
2351127 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abstract of the Environmental and Health Administration's Report from Frederica: relationship between air pollution and lung cancer not proven]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27458
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Feb 14;79(7):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-1979
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Feb 14;79(7):17
Date
Feb-14-1979
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Denmark
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
PubMed ID
254454 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A case study of the contents of radionuclides and of main chemical pollutants in the atmospheric air of Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184554
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 May-Jun;(3):19-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
I P Korenkov
O S Chapkovich
P A Briukhanov
F I Pasechnik
N K Shandala
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 May-Jun;(3):19-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Public Health
Russia
Abstract
The article contains data on monitoring the atmospheric air pollution in Moscow. Thus, the below figures are presented: beta ranges from 2.6 E-0.5 to 5.7 E-0.04 Bk/m3, airborne pollutants amount to 3-80 mkg/m3, sulfates--0.002-1.58 mkg(S)/m3, nitrates--0.05-0.75 mkg(N2)/m3 ammonium ions--0.12-1.20 mkg (N2)/m3, sulfuric dioxides--0.11-1.20 mkg (S)/m3. nitric dioxides--0.05-0.5 mlg (N2)/m3 and nitric acid--0.01-0.08 mkg (N2)/m3. The concentration of airborne pollutants exceeds the regional European level (22 mkg/m3) and that of Russia's European part (12 ... 28 mkg/m3) approximately by 1.5 times. It is noteworthy that it reaches 50 ... 70 mkg/m3 in large industrial centers of Europe. The share of sulfuric and nitric acids in the total concentration of airborne pollutants is (by weight) 13%. 0.8 g of sulfur per m2/year and 0.34 g of nitrogen per m2/year fall in the area of Sport-and-Recreation Complex No. 3 with precipitations; the average total beta-activity of atmospheric precipitations amounts to 1.2 Bk/m2 per day. An analysis of relationships between the air dustiness, the ashes samples' weight (of the air) and cuvette (precipitations) is indicative of their direct and tense correlation: the correlation coefficient between dust and ashes samples is 0.716, and between dust and ashes samples of cuvettes--0.559. At the same time, an extremely weak correlation should be pointed out between air dustiness and the total beta-activity of samples--the correlation coefficient is 0.184 (during a warm year season), as well as between dustiness and the beta-activity of cuvettes--0.346.
PubMed ID
12852032 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of immunocorrection in children with bronchial asthma living in ecologically contrasted regions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15907
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jul-Aug;(7-8):59-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Trishina
V N Zorin
Iu F Babin
S V Trishin
A V Ruban
V V Ruban
V S Skorobatskii
Source
Lik Sprava. 1995 Jul-Aug;(7-8):59-61
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - administration & dosage
Adolescent
Aerosols
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - drug therapy - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Ecology
English Abstract
Humans
T-Lymphocytes - drug effects - immunology
Thymus Hormones - administration & dosage
Ukraine
Abstract
Overall 50 children suffering from infectious-allergic bronchial asthma who live in ecologically contrasting regions were examined. Those children residing in unfavourable, in terms of ecological conditions, regions demonstrated diminution of the peripheral blood T-lymphocytes together with a decrease in their functional activity as well as in the activity of interleukin 2. It is in this group of children that immunomodulating effect of thymalin is less apparent. It is suggested that the relevant immune correction in such cases might be achieved through repeated courses of treatment with immunomodulating agents and rehabilitation of patients in favourable ecological conditions together with prescribing of other immunostimulators of selective action in respect of the T-link of the immunity system.
PubMed ID
8846376 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Mar;123(3):632-819111332
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Sep 15;164(6):505-1716798793
Cites: Environ Health. 2009;8:4519781087
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 2011 Jan;46(1):1-1720963782
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 Sep;14(3):669-7710543291
Cites: Allergy. 2000 Dec;55(12):1163-911117274
Cites: Environ Toxicol. 2001 Jun;16(3):269-7611409199
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Oct;74(8):574-811768046
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2003 Feb;24(2):160-912568822
Cites: Can Respir J. 2004 Jul-Aug;11(5):343-815332136
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1985 Aug;132(2):261-74026051
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1986 May;133(5):834-423706894
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1988 Jan-Feb;43(1):22-73355241
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Mar;139(3):587-942923355
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Mar;139(3):595-6002923356
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 1991;11(2):127-331758730
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Jan;147(1):118-248420404
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1993 Sep-Oct;48(5):328-358215597
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1993 Aug;47(4):282-68228762
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1994 Mar-Apr;49(2):111-88161240
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Jun;48(3):237-478051521
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Nov;150(5 Pt 1):1234-427952546
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jan 15;141(2):111-227817967
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1995 Sep;103 Suppl 6:49-538549489
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Mar 16;312(7032):661-58597731
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1996 May;104(5):500-58743437
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 15;144(6):570-818797517
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Mar;155(3):1042-99116984
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Aug;156(2 Pt 1):546-529279238
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1998 Mar;11(3):677-859596121
Cites: Pediatr Pulmonol. 1998 May;25(5):299-3039635930
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1998 Dec;12(6):1354-619877490
Cites: Health Rep. 1998 Winter;10(3):9-21 (ENG); 9-22 (FRE)9926344
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Mar 13;353(9156):874-810093979
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Jun 1;171(11):1272-815764722
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2005 Sep;55(6):425-3116140835
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Sep 13;173(6 Suppl):S12-416157728
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Oct;35(10):1279-8716238786
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Apr;117(4):653-919440507
PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute intestinal infections in children in areas with industrial environmental air pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183961
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E D Savilov
E B Shcherbakova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):6-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology
Environmental Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Russia - epidemiology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Abstract
Acute intestinal infections were clinically and epidemiologically studied in children residing in the towns with different quantitative and qualitative composition of ambient air pollutants and in the districts of a town, which differ in the level of technogenic ambient air pollution. Six hundred and eighty patients with different types of shigellosis and 421 patients with salmonellosis admitted to the infection hospitals of the towns of Angarsk (an intensively polluted locality) and Irkutsk (a better ecological area) were examined in 1995 to 2000. The technogenic ambient air pollution was found to exert a noticeable impact on the incidence with S. sonnei dysentery. In poor environmental areas, all the infections under study are characterized by a great burden, duration, more severe clinical symptoms, and poor laboratory changes in the presence of a decreased responsiveness.
PubMed ID
12934271 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adaptive capacities of children with different number of congenital morphogenetic variants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127921
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
E N Kotysheva
M Iu Bolotskaia
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):69-73
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects - genetics
Adaptation, Psychological - drug effects
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Autonomic Nervous System - drug effects - growth & development - physiology
Child
Environmental monitoring
Genetic Variation
Humans
Metallurgy
Morphogenesis - drug effects - genetics
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Adaptive capacities were studied in 6-7-year-ol apparently healthy children in relation to the number of congenital morphogenetic variants (CMVs). The most markedly reduced adaptive capacities were revealed in children with 5 CMVs or more.
PubMed ID
22250398 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A decrease in the motor activity of children under the influence of technogenic air pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201982
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 Mar-Apr;(2):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S L Ust'iantsev
V G Kulikov
Source
Gig Sanit. 1999 Mar-Apr;(2):26-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Growth
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Male
Motor Activity
Russia
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Among multiple and various functions of the body, motor activity is essential. But it is little studied in schoolchildren. The present study was undertaken to investigate the impact of industrial pollution of the ambient air on the motor activity in old schoolchildren. At school, the motor activity of 8th-, 10th-, and 11th-form schoolchildren was found to decrease with age, the dynamics of its decrease was determined by not only sexual differences of pupils, but also by the technogenic ambient air pollutions.
PubMed ID
10349234 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjusting for temporal variation in the analysis of parallel time series of health and environmental variables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205764
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Apr-Jun;8(2):129-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Cakmak
R. Burnett
D. Krewski
Author Affiliation
Health Protection Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. scakmak@ehd.hwc.ca
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Apr-Jun;8(2):129-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Hospitalization
Humans
Lung Diseases - etiology
Models, Statistical
Ontario
Ozone - adverse effects
Public Health
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Time series of daily administrative cardio-respiratory health and environmental information have been extensively used to assess the potential public health impact of ambient air pollution. Both series are subject to strong but unrelated temporal cycles. These cycles must be removed from the time series prior to examining the role air pollution plays in exacerbating cardio-respiratory disease. In this paper, we examine a number of methods of temporal filtering that have been proposed to eliminate such temporal effects. The techniques are illustrated by linking the number of daily admissions to hospital for respiratory diseases in Toronto, Canada for the 11 year period 1981 to 1991 with daily concentrations of ambient ozone. The ozone-hospitalization relationship was found to be highly sensitive to the length of temporal cycle removed from the admission time series, and to day of the week effects, ranging from a relative risk of 0.874 if long wave cycles were not removed at all to 1.020 for models which removed at least cycles greater than or equal to one month based on the interquartile pollutant range. The specific statistical method of adjustment was not a critical factor. The association was not as sensitive to removal of cycles less than one month, except that negative autocorrelation increased for series in which cycles of one week or less were removed. We recommend three criteria in selecting the degree of smoothing in the outcome: removal of temporal cycles, minimizing autocorrelation and optimizing goodness of fit. The association between ambient ozone levels and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases was also sensitive to the season of examination, with weaker associations observed outside the summer months.
PubMed ID
9577746 View in PubMed
Less detail

665 records – page 1 of 67.