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Condensation and mould: the Canadian experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212312
Source
J R Soc Health. 1996 Apr;116(2):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
K F Rayner
Author Affiliation
Open University.
Source
J R Soc Health. 1996 Apr;116(2):83-6
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Climate
Fungi
Great Britain
Heating
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
International Educational Exchange
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Ventilation - standards
Abstract
It has been estimated that up to 20% of the UK housing stock is significantly affected by dampness and associated with mould growth. The effects on the health of the occupants of affected homes are well documented. The recent imposition of VAT at 17.5% on domestic fuel is generally regarded as likely to worsen the problem. However, this deteriorating situation puts me in mind of a recent study tour to Canada where the problem of dampness in housing is being tackled very differently to the United Kingdom. Are there any lessons to be learnt?
PubMed ID
8627592 View in PubMed
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Provision of smoke-free homes and vehicles for kindergarten children: associated factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129878
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2011 Dec;26(6):e69-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Beverley Temple
Joy Johnson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. bev_temple@umanitoba.ca
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2011 Dec;26(6):e69-78
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Automobiles
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many children continue to be exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) each day. To describe the factors associated with providing a smoke-free home (PSFH) and vehicle (PSFV) for kindergarten children, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in Manitoba, Canada, with 551 mothers and primary caregivers responding. A social-ecologic model of health behavior guided the study. In the bivariate analysis, being better educated, living with a partner, and having a higher income were associated with PSFH. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, the variables most predictive for PSFH were living with a partner and the mother's self-efficacy, and for PSFV, the most predictive variables were the mother's self-efficacy and ETS knowledge. Smoking behaviors are complex and must be considered broadly within all levels of influence if nurses are to assist parents in protecting their children.
PubMed ID
22055386 View in PubMed
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Wood-burning stoves get help from HEPA filters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135643
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Apr;119(4):A164
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Carol Potera
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Apr;119(4):A164
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis - blood - urine
Air Pollution, Indoor - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia
Cooking - instrumentation - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Filtration - instrumentation - methods
Fires
Humans
Particulate Matter - analysis
Wood
Notes
Cites: Inhal Toxicol. 2007 Jan;19(1):67-10617127644
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Mar 13;115(10):1285-9517353456
Cites: Environ Health. 2011;10:921255392
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 May 1;183(9):1222-3021257787
PubMed ID
21459694 View in PubMed
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