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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Miljø og Sundhed, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Animals
Cattle
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health
Humans
Methane - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pollen
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Air quality, health and climate change are closely connected. Ozone depends on temperature and the greenhouse gas methane from cattle and biomass. Pollen presence depends on temperature and CO2. The effect of climate change on particulate air pollution is complex, but the likely net effect is greater health risks. Reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions by reduced livestock production and use of combustion for energy production, transport and heating will also improve air quality. Energy savings in buildings and use of CO2 neutral fuels should not deteriorate indoor and outdoor air quality.
PubMed ID
19857393 View in PubMed
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Allergens and endotoxin in settled dust from day-care centers and schools in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29525
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
C. Instanes
G. Hetland
S. Berntsen
M. Løvik
P. Nafstad
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. christine.instanes@fhi.no
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides - analysis
Cats
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Dogs
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Glycoproteins - analysis
Humans
Norway
Pyroglyphidae
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Abstract
Allergy to indoor allergens can cause frequent and severe health problems in children. Because little is known about the content of allergens in the indoor environments in Norway, we wanted to assess the levels of cat, dog and mite allergens in schools and day-care centers in Oslo. Allergen levels in dust samples from 155 classrooms and 81 day-care units were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Additionally, we measured the levels of endotoxin in 31 day-care units, using the limulus amebocyte lysate test. Most of the dust samples contained detectable amounts of cat and dog allergens. In mattress and floor dust (day-care centers), and curtain and floor dust (schools) the median Fel d 1 levels were 0.17, 0.002, 0.02 and 0.079 microg/m2, while the median Can f 1 levels were 1.7, 0.03, 0.1 and 0.69 microg/m2, respectively. Levels of cat and dog allergens in school floor dust were associated with the number of pupils with animals at home. In contrast,
PubMed ID
16108908 View in PubMed
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Cat (Fel d I), dog (Can f I), and cockroach allergens in homes of asthmatic children from three climatic zones in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15951
Source
Allergy. 1994 Aug;49(7):508-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A K Munir
B. Björkstén
R. Einarsson
C. Schou
A. Ekstrand-Tobin
A. Warner
N I Kjellman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1994 Aug;49(7):508-16
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Conditioning
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Asthma - immunology
Cats
Child
Climate
Cockroaches
Dogs
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Glycoproteins - adverse effects - analysis
Housing
Housing, Animal
Humans
Humidity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
We have investigated the levels of cat (Fel d I), dog (Can f I), and cockroach (Per a I) allergens in dust from bedrooms, living rooms, kitchens, and bathrooms from 123 homes of asthmatic children in three zones of Sweden with varying climates. Absolute indoor humidity (AIH), relative humidity (RH), rate of ventilation in air changes per hour (ach), and number of airborne particles were also measured. Fel d I, Can f I, and Per a I allergen contents were determined by mab ELISA, and the levels were related to various environmental factors. The major cat allergen, Fel d I, was detected in all homes, and the concentrations varied between 16 ng and 28,000 ng/g fine dust. The dog allergen, Can f I, was detected in 85% of the homes, and the levels varied from 60 ng to 866,000 ng/g dust. Cockroach allergen was detected in only one home (40 ng/g). Fel d I and Can f I allergens were equally distributed geographically. Dust from living rooms contained significantly higher (P or = 7 g/kg or RH > or = 45%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7825716 View in PubMed
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New ventilation systems at select schools in Sweden--effects on asthma and exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15595
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Jan-Feb;55(1):18-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Smedje
D. Norbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University and University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2000 Jan-Feb;55(1):18-25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Humans
Humidity
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sweden - epidemiology
Ventilation
Abstract
The air-exchange rate is often low in schools. The authors studied the possible impact of improving school ventilation on health and exposure of pupils. Questionnaire data on allergies, asthma, and asthmatic symptoms were obtained in 1993 and 1995 for 1,476 primary- and secondary-school pupils in 39 randomly selected schools. Various exposure factors were measured in 1993 and 1995 in approximately 100 classrooms. In 12% of the classrooms, new ventilation systems were installed between 1993 and 1995; the subsequent air-exchange rate increased and the relative humidity and concentration of several airborne pollutants were reduced compared with classrooms in nonimproved buildings. The reporting of at least one asthmatic symptom and the reporting of more asthmatic symptoms in 1995 than in 1993 were less common among the 143 pupils who attended schools with new ventilation systems.
PubMed ID
10735515 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Offentl Gesundheitswes. 1991 Aug-Sep;53(8-9):376-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Seifert
Author Affiliation
Institut für Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene des Bundesgesundheitsamtes, Berlin-Dahlem.
Source
Offentl Gesundheitswes. 1991 Aug-Sep;53(8-9):376-82
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
English Abstract
Humans
Risk factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Ventilation
Abstract
The term "sick building syndrome" (SBS) has been used for several years to describe a number of mostly unspecific complaints of some occupants of air-conditioned buildings. Based on the literature, a definition of the SBS is given and some results of larger SBS studies carried out in Germany, Denmark and the United Kingdom are described. These studies show that SBS is a multifactorial event which may include physical, chemical, biological as well as psychological factors. In many cases, the occurrence of SBS in a building is due to insufficient maintenance of the HVAC system. SBS-induced investigations in a building should be carried out stepwise, the measurement of indoor air pollutants not being the first step. Strategies to avoid SBS must take into account factors specific to the building, the HVAC system and the equipment as well as psychological factors.
PubMed ID
1837855 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.