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228 records – page 1 of 23.

Source
Duodecim. 1996;112(15):1378-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
T. Haahtela
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Duodecim. 1996;112(15):1378-89
Date
1996
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Risk assessment
PubMed ID
10596122 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Airborne dust particles in indoor environment and allergy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15479
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Apr 30;121(11):1344-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-2001
Author
H. Ormstad
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for miljømedisin, Statens institutt for folkehelse, Postboks 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo. heidi.ormstad@folkehelsa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Apr 30;121(11):1344-50
Date
Apr-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
English Abstract
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - chemically induced - etiology - immunology
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission
Norway
Particle Size
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - etiology - immunology
Sulfur Compounds - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The overall aim of this study was to investigate how airborne house dust particles may contribute to an allergic immune response, and thereby also to asthma and allergic diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using transmission electron microscopy, we quantified and characterized airborne house dust particles, with regard to elemental and size distribution. Furthermore, an immunogold labelling technique was used to study whether some common allergens were present on the surface of airborne house dust particles. Finally, a mouse model was used to study the adjuvant activity of airborne house dust on the IgE antibody response. RESULTS: A vast majority of the airborne particles samples from homes in Oslo were found to be less than 2.5 microns in diameter, thus they are liable to penetrate deep into the respiratory tree. This PM2.5 fraction contained, in addition to sulphur aerosols and silicates, many soot particles, most of them being less than 1 micron in diameter. These soot particles were found to carry allergens on their surface. We also found that diesel exhaust particles, which is probably a main soot component of airborne house dust, absorbed several wellknown allergens in vitro. Furthermore, the airborne house dust particles were found to elicit a local lymph node response, and to have an adjuvant activity on the production of IgE antibodies to ovalbumin as a model allergen. INTERPRETATION: These results show that indoor suspended particulate matter contains a lot of potential allergen carriers, i.e. soot particles (carbon aggregates), most of them being less that 1 micron in diameter and thereby able to transport allergens deep into the airways. In addition, our results indicate that suspended particulate matter may have an adjuvant effect on the production of IgE to common environmental allergens, and also may provoke a local inflammatory response.
PubMed ID
11419103 View in PubMed
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Airborne molds and bacteria, microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC), plasticizers and formaldehyde in dwellings in three North European cities in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117626
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 1;444:433-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2013
Author
Bo Sahlberg
Maria Gunnbjörnsdottir
Argo Soon
Rain Jogi
Thorarinn Gislason
Gunilla Wieslander
Christer Janson
Dan Norback
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. bo.sahlberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 1;444:433-40
Date
Feb-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Cities
Estonia
Female
Formaldehyde - analysis - toxicity
Fungi
Furans - analysis - toxicity
Glycols - analysis
Humans
Iceland
Male
Methyl n-Butyl Ketone - analysis - toxicity
Octanols - analysis - toxicity
Plasticizers - toxicity
Sick Building Syndrome - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
There are few studies on associations between airborne microbial exposure, formaldehyde, plasticizers in dwellings and the symptoms compatible with the sick building syndrome (SBS). As a follow-up of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS II), indoor measurements were performed in homes in three North European cities. The aim was to examine whether volatile organic compounds of possible microbial origin (MVOCs), and airborne levels of bacteria, molds, formaldehyde, and two plasticizers in dwellings were associated with the prevalence of SBS, and to study associations between MVOCs and reports on dampness and mold. The study included homes from three centers included in ECRHS II. A total of 159 adults (57% females) participated (19% from Reykjavik, 40% from Uppsala, and 41% from Tartu). A random sample and additional homes with a history of dampness were included. Exposure measurements were performed in the 159 homes of the participants. MVOCs were analyzed by GCMS with selective ion monitoring (SIM). Symptoms were reported in a standardized questionnaire. Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. In total 30.8% reported any SBS (20% mucosal, 10% general, and 8% dermal symptoms) and 41% of the homes had a history of dampness and molds There were positive associations between any SBS and levels of 2-pentanol (P=0.002), 2-hexanone (P=0.0002), 2-pentylfuran (P=0.009), 1-octen-3-ol (P=0.002), formaldehyde (P=0.05), and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol monoisobutyrate (Texanol) (P=0.05). 1-octen-3-ol (P=0.009) and 3-methylfuran (P=0.002) were associated with mucosal symptoms. In dwellings with dampness and molds, the levels of total bacteria (P=0.02), total mold (P=0.04), viable mold (P=0.02), 3-methylfuran (P=0.008) and ethyl-isobutyrate (P=0.02) were higher. In conclusion, some MVOCs like 1-octen-3-ol, formaldehyde and the plasticizer Texanol, may be a risk factor for sick building syndrome. Moreover, concentrations of airborne molds, bacteria and some other MVOCs were slightly higher in homes with reported dampness and mold.
PubMed ID
23280302 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne mutagens and carcinogens from cooking and other food preparation processes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23631
Source
Toxicol Lett. 1994 Jun;72(1-3):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
G. Löfroth
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Unit, Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Toxicol Lett. 1994 Jun;72(1-3):83-6
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Amines - adverse effects - chemistry
Carcinogens - chemistry - toxicity
Cookery
Food
Heat
Heterocyclic Compounds - adverse effects - chemistry
Humans
Mutagens - adverse effects - chemistry
Abstract
The common food preparation processes, frying, broiling and baking, can give rise to air pollutants that are known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal tests. A large number of persons can be exposed to such fumes as cooking is performed in most households and in many commercial enterprises. Additional studies on the emissions from these processes and exposure measurements are needed. Epidemiological studies on occupationally-exposed cooks and bakers with respect to cancer are equivocal.
PubMed ID
8202960 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Loft Steffen
Author Affiliation
Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Miljø og Sundhed, Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, Øster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. s.loft@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3168-71
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Animals
Cattle
Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Health
Humans
Methane - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pollen
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Air quality, health and climate change are closely connected. Ozone depends on temperature and the greenhouse gas methane from cattle and biomass. Pollen presence depends on temperature and CO2. The effect of climate change on particulate air pollution is complex, but the likely net effect is greater health risks. Reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions by reduced livestock production and use of combustion for energy production, transport and heating will also improve air quality. Energy savings in buildings and use of CO2 neutral fuels should not deteriorate indoor and outdoor air quality.
PubMed ID
19857393 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergens and endotoxin in settled dust from day-care centers and schools in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29525
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
C. Instanes
G. Hetland
S. Berntsen
M. Løvik
P. Nafstad
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. christine.instanes@fhi.no
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides - analysis
Cats
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Dogs
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Glycoproteins - analysis
Humans
Norway
Pyroglyphidae
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Abstract
Allergy to indoor allergens can cause frequent and severe health problems in children. Because little is known about the content of allergens in the indoor environments in Norway, we wanted to assess the levels of cat, dog and mite allergens in schools and day-care centers in Oslo. Allergen levels in dust samples from 155 classrooms and 81 day-care units were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Additionally, we measured the levels of endotoxin in 31 day-care units, using the limulus amebocyte lysate test. Most of the dust samples contained detectable amounts of cat and dog allergens. In mattress and floor dust (day-care centers), and curtain and floor dust (schools) the median Fel d 1 levels were 0.17, 0.002, 0.02 and 0.079 microg/m2, while the median Can f 1 levels were 1.7, 0.03, 0.1 and 0.69 microg/m2, respectively. Levels of cat and dog allergens in school floor dust were associated with the number of pupils with animals at home. In contrast,
PubMed ID
16108908 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 25;161(4):414-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-1999
Author
H. Mosbech
Author Affiliation
Lunge- og allergiklinikken, Frederiksberg Hospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Jan 25;161(4):414-8
Date
Jan-25-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis - immunology
Animals
Bedding and Linens
Child
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
English Abstract
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mites
Specimen Handling - instrumentation
Abstract
House dust mites are the most important indoor allergens in our region. During recent years more dwellings have become infested, most likely as a result of increased indoor humidity due to reduced ventilation. Among Danish adults, 14% have developed IgE against mites. The allergens are stable and can remain for years. Keeping the humidity low ( 55 degrees C mites are killed and allergens removed. In addition mattress covers seem to be useful, although guidelines for quality assessment are lacking. Reduction in mite exposure will reduce development of allergy in all age groups especially in the newborn period. Immunotherapy can be offered in rhinitis and moderate asthma when sufficient allergen reduction cannot be accomplished.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 20;160(17):2550-19599539
PubMed ID
9951355 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambient air levels and the exposure of children to benzene, toluene, and xylenes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34102
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
C. Lohse
B L Thomsen
H. Skov
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Benzene - analysis - toxicity
Child
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Toluene - analysis - toxicity
Urban health
Xylenes - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
The aims of the study were to evaluate if the front-door concentrations of benzene, toluene, and xylenes can be used to classify the personal exposures of Danish children and to identify factors that affect their personal exposure. Average concentrations were measured over 1 week with diffusive samplers, and the personal exposures of 98 children and the concentrations outside the front doors of their homes were measured simultaneously. Time and activity patterns were noted in diaries. The front-door concentrations were significantly higher in Copenhagen than in rural areas (all P
PubMed ID
9417846 View in PubMed
Less detail

An approach to management of critical indoor air problems in school buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201320
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107 Suppl 3:509-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
U. Haverinen
T. Husman
M. Toivola
J. Suonketo
M. Pentti
R. Lindberg
J. Leinonen
A. Hyvärinen
T. Meklin
A. Nevalainen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Unit of Epidemiology, Kuopio, Finland. ulla.haverinen@ktl.fi
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107 Suppl 3:509-14
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - prevention & control
Child
Communication
Environmental health
Environmental Microbiology
Finland
Humans
Humidity - adverse effects - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Schools
Abstract
This study was conducted in a school center that had been the focus of intense public concern over 2 years because of suspected mold and health problems. Because several attempts to find solutions to the problem within the community were not satisfactory, outside specialists were needed for support in solving the problem. The study group consisted of experts in civil engineering, indoor mycology, and epidemiology. The studies were conducted in close cooperation with the city administration. Structures at risk were opened, moisture and temperature were measured, and the causes of damage were analyzed. Microbial samples were taken from the air, surfaces, and materials. Health questionnaires were sent to the schoolchildren and personnel. Information on the measurements and their results was released regularly to school employees, students and their parents, and to the media. Repairs were designed on the basis of this information. Moisture damage was caused mainly by difficult moisture conditions at the building site, poor ventilation, and water leaks. Fungal genera (concentrations
Notes
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1992 Dec 15;127(1-2):79-891480960
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1995 Jul;8(7):1155-607589401
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 1997 Nov;86(11):1181-79401510
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1997 Aug;10(8):1787-949272920
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1996 Feb;22(1):5-138685674
PubMed ID
10423392 View in PubMed
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Assessment and management of residential radon health risks: a report from the health Canada radon workshop.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169838
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2006 Apr;69(7):735-58
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Bliss L Tracy
Daniel Krewski
Jing Chen
Jan M Zielinski
Kevin P Brand
Dorothy Meyerhof
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2006 Apr;69(7):735-58
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Housing
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Radon - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies of uranium miners and other underground miners have consistently shown miners exposed to high levels of radon to be at increased risk of lung cancer. More recently, concern has arisen about lung cancer risks among people exposed to lower levels of radon in homes. The current Canadian guideline for residential radon exposure was set in 1988 at 800 Bq/m(3). Because of the accumulation of a considerable body of new scientific evidence on radon lung cancer risks since that time, Health Canada sponsored a workshop to review the current state-of-the-science on radon health risks. The specific objectives of the workshop were (1) to collect and assess scientific information relevant to setting national radon policy in Canada, and (2) to gather information on social, political, and operational considerations in setting national policy. The workshop, held on 3-4 March 2004, was attended by 38 invited scientists, regulators, and other stakeholders from Canada and the United States. The presentations on the first day dealt primarily with scientific issues. The combined analysis of North American residential radon and lung cancer studies was reviewed. The analysis confirmed a small but detectable increase in lung cancer risk at residential exposure levels. Current estimates suggest that radon in homes is responsible for approximately 10% of all lung cancer deaths in Canada, making radon the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. This was followed by a perspective from an UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) working group on radon. There were two presentations on occupational exposures to radon and two presentations considered the possibility of radon as a causative factor for cardiovascular disease and for cancer in other organs besides the lung. The possible contribution of environmental tobacco smoke to lung cancers in nonsmokers was also considered. Areas for future research were identified. The second day was devoted to policy and operational issues. The presentations began with a perspective from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, followed by a history of radon policy development in Canada. Subsequent presentations dealt with the cost-effectiveness of radon mitigation, Canadian building codes and radon, and a summary of radon standards from around the world. Provincial representatives and a private consultant were given opportunities to present their viewpoints. A number of strategies for reducing residential radon exposure in Canada were recognized, including testing and mitigation of existing homes (on either a widespread or targeted basis) and changing the building code to require that radon mitigation devices be installed at the time a new home is constructed. The various elements of a comprehensive national radon policy were set forth.
PubMed ID
16608836 View in PubMed
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228 records – page 1 of 23.