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Effect of 3 years' free-air exposure to elevated ozone on mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) needle epicuticular wax physicochemical characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90182
Source
Environ Pollut. 2009 May;157(5):1657-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Percy Kevin E
Manninen Sirkku
Häberle Karl-Heinz
Heerdt C.
Werner H.
Henderson Gary W
Matyssek Rainer
Author Affiliation
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service-Atlantic Forestry Centre, 1350 Regent Street, Fredericton, NB, Canada E3B 5P7. kpercy@nbnet.nb.ca
Source
Environ Pollut. 2009 May;157(5):1657-65
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - pharmacology
Alcohols - metabolism
Ecotoxicology - methods
Fatty Acids - metabolism
Norway
Oxidants, Photochemical - pharmacology
Ozone - pharmacology
Picea - drug effects - metabolism
Plant Leaves - drug effects - metabolism
Waxes - chemistry
Abstract
We examined the effect of ozone (O(3)) on Norway spruce (Picea abies) needle epicuticular wax over three seasons at the Kranzberg Ozone Fumigation Experiment. Exposure to 2x ambient O(3) ranged from 64.5 to 74.2 microl O(3) l(-1) h AOT40, and 117.1 to 123.2 nl O(3) l(-1) 4th highest daily maximum 8-h average O(3) concentration. The proportion of current-year needle surface covered by wax tubes, tube aggregates, and plates decreased (P=0.011) under 2x O(3). Epistomatal chambers had increased deposits of amorphous wax. Proportion of secondary alcohols varied due to year (P=0.004) and O(3) treatment (P=0.029). Secondary alcohols were reduced by 9.1% under 2x O(3). Exposure to 2x O(3) increased (P=0.037) proportions of fatty acids by 29%. Opposing trends in secondary alcohols and fatty acids indicate a direct action of O(3) on wax biosynthesis. These results demonstrate O(3)-induced changes in biologically important needle surface characteristics of 50-year-old field-grown trees.
PubMed ID
19188008 View in PubMed
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[Effect of atmospheric pollution on the external respiratory function in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42720
Source
Gig Sanit. 1975 Mar;(3):114-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1975

The non-occupational environment and the lung: opportunities for intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95584
Source
Chron Respir Dis. 2007;4(4):227-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kurmi O P
Ayres J G
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Liberty Safe Work Research Centre, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
Source
Chron Respir Dis. 2007;4(4):227-36
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - pharmacology
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Climate
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Lung
Weather
Abstract
Many environmental factors, both indoors and outdoors, can cause or worsen respiratory disease. Although in many cases individuals have little influence over environmental exposures (e.g., weather conditions), there are many (such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and outdoor air pollution) where interventions can improve health. While for environmental exposures such as air pollution, remediation largely devolves to the government, for exposures such as ETS advice to individuals in these settings will confer benefit. Climate change has begun to feature more and more in the context of health but how this may affect pulmonary disease remains debatable. It is possible that heat associated changes in allergen exposures may be more than counterbalanced by potential reductions in cold related exacerbations of diseases such as COPD. An improved assessment of environmental exposures is key in how we approach the effects of the environment on lung disease which would allow better understanding of gene-environment interactions and how remediation might influence population health for the better.
PubMed ID
18029436 View in PubMed
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Response of mycorrhizal Norway spruce seedlings to various nitrogen loads and sources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61735
Source
Environ Pollut. 2001;114(2):223-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
I. Brunner
S. Brodbeck
Author Affiliation
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Birmensdorf. brunner@wsl.ch
Source
Environ Pollut. 2001;114(2):223-33
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - pharmacology
Biomass
Fungi - physiology
Nitrogen - pharmacology
Picea - growth & development - physiology
Plant Roots - growth & development - microbiology
Plants
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds - chemistry
Abstract
Norway spruce seedlings were grown under greenhouse conditions in Rootrainers with a vermiculite-peat moss mixture under various N-regimes for 6 months. Either ammonium or nitrate was applied in loads of 100 or 800 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) to seedlings which were either non-mycorrhizal or inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungi Hebeloma crustuliniforme or Laccaria bicolor. The use of increasing N loads enhanced shoot and total biomass, whereas root/shoot ratio, number of short roots and mycorrhization decreased. A significant enhancement of the concentration and content was obvious for the element N, whereas a significant decrease was obvious for P and Zn concentrations. The use of ammonium, as opposed to nitrate, significantly enhanced the biomass and the numbers of short roots, and reduced the root/shoot ratios, but did not influence the mycorrhization. It further significantly enhanced the N concentrations in roots and shoots. Fungal inoculation with H. crustuliniforme or L. bicolor compared to non-inoculated controls significantly enhanced shoot and total biomass, but reduced root/shoot ratios. The mycorrhization further significantly enhanced N and P concentrations and contents, but reduced Mn. Overall, the mycorrhization improved the P nutrition of the seedlings independently on the applied N loads or N sources. Dose response curves using ammonium nitrate as N source with a maximum load of 1600 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) applied on seedlings associated with H. crustuliniforme revealed that the maximum growth was reached at a load of 800 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) with a simultaneous decrease of the mycorrhization. In both shoots and roots, N concentrations increased constantly with increasing N loads, while P, Ca, and Zn concentrations decreased constantly.
PubMed ID
11504345 View in PubMed
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