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[Economic evaluation of aerogenic carcinogenic risk in the population of an industrial town].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187389
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 Sep-Oct;(5):80-1
Publication Type
Article

Evaluation and identification of priority air pollutants for environmental management on the basis of risk analysis in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159794
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008;71(1):86-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Alexander Golub
Elena Strukova
Author Affiliation
Global and Regional Air Program, Environmental Defense, Washington, DC 20009, USA. agolub@environmentaldefense.org
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008;71(1):86-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - economics - toxicity
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Costs and Cost Analysis
Humans
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis - economics - toxicity
Risk assessment
Russia
Abstract
Since 1997, more than 30 health-risk analyses were conducted using Russian data sets. These studies demonstrated that air pollution is the most important environmental contributor toward morbidity and mortality risk in Russia, with 90% of the total human health risk coming from the criteria pollutants total suspended particulate (TSP), SO2, and NO(x). This article contributes to the ongoing discussion of the magnitude of this health issue in Russia by providing an estimate of both the mortality rate attributed to airborne pollutants and the associated economic damages. The 90% confidence interval of mortality is 46,000-132,000, and the associated economic damages are between 2.6 and 6.5% of gross domestic product (GDP). The largest source of uncertainty in mortality is the concentration-response parameter, accounting for 50-60% of the total variability in the estimate. The point estimate of 87,000 implies that mortality due to airborne pollutants is threefold higher than reported due to tuberculosis, twofold due to transportation accidents, and about the same as that from suicide and homicide combined. By 2002 there was enough evidence regarding potential health hazard and air pollution exposure in Russia to start environmental management reform. In 2004 Russia officially adopted guidelines for health risk analysis associated with air pollution. The next step is to use this health-risk assessment approach as a lead for sensible reforms of the emissions-permit system and environmental finance.
PubMed ID
18080899 View in PubMed
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Health Impacts of Ambient Air Pollution in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297499
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 04 12; 15(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-12-2018
Author
Heli Lehtomäki
Antti Korhonen
Arja Asikainen
Niko Karvosenoja
Kaarle Kupiainen
Ville-Veikko Paunu
Mikko Savolahti
Mikhail Sofiev
Yuliia Palamarchuk
Ari Karppinen
Jaakko Kukkonen
Otto Hänninen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), 70701 Kuopio, Finland. heli.lehtomaki@thl.fi.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 04 12; 15(4):
Date
04-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis - economics
Air Pollution - analysis - economics
Environmental Exposure - analysis - economics
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Models, Chemical
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - economics
Ozone - analysis - economics
Particulate Matter - analysis - economics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Risk
Spatial Analysis
Abstract
Air pollution has been estimated to be one of the leading environmental health risks in Finland. National health impact estimates existing to date have focused on particles (PM) and ozone (O3). In this work, we quantify the impacts of particles, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in 2015, and analyze the related uncertainties. The exposures were estimated with a high spatial resolution chemical transport model, and adjusted to observed concentrations. We calculated the health impacts according to Word Health Organization (WHO) working group recommendations. According to our results, ambient air pollution caused a burden of 34,800 disability-adjusted life years (DALY). Fine particles were the main contributor (74%) to the disease burden, which is in line with the earlier studies. The attributable burden was dominated by mortality (32,900 years of life lost (YLL); 95%). Impacts differed between population age groups. The burden was clearly higher in the adult population over 30 years (98%), due to the dominant role of mortality impacts. Uncertainties due to the concentration-response functions were larger than those related to exposures.
PubMed ID
29649153 View in PubMed
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Regional air pollution at a turning point.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95806
Source
Ambio. 2005 Feb;34(1):2-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Grennfelt Peringe
Hov Oystein
Author Affiliation
Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Göteborg, Sweden. grennfelt@ivl.se
Source
Ambio. 2005 Feb;34(1):2-10
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - economics
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Climate
Europe
Humans
International Cooperation
Seasons
Social Conditions
Abstract
The control of transboundary air pollution in Europe has been successful. Emissions of many key pollutants are decreasing and there are signs of improvements in damaged ecosystems. The strategies under development within the CAFE programme under the European Commission and the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP), aim to take regional air pollution control a large step further, in particular with respect to small particles. In this paper we highlight the new strategies but look primarily at socioeconomic trends and climate change feedbacks that may have a significant influence on the outcome of the strategies and which so far have not been considered. In particular, we point out the influence on air quality of increased summer temperatures in Europe and of increasing emissions including international shipping, outside of Europe. Taken together the further emissions reductions in Europe and the increasing background pollution, slowly cause a greying of the Northern Hemisphere troposphere rather than the traditional picture of dominant emissions in Europe and North America ('black') with much lower emission intensities elsewhere ('white'). A hemispheric approach to further combat air pollution will become necessary in Europe and elsewhere.
PubMed ID
15789512 View in PubMed
Less detail

Report of an expert panel to review the socio-economic models and related components supporting the development of Canada-Wide Standards (CWS) for particulate matter (PM) and ozone to the Royal Society of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179760
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2004 May-Jun;7(3):147-266
Publication Type
Article