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527 records – page 1 of 53.

Aalborg, Denmark: a role model for waste management practices to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98696
Source
Waste Manag Res. 2009 Nov;27(9):837-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009

Accumulation of heavy metals in circumpolar willow ptarmigan (Lagopus l. lagopus) populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166941
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Dec 1;371(1-3):176-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2006
Author
H C Pedersen
F. Fossøy
J A Kålås
S. Lierhagen
Author Affiliation
Division of Terrestrial Ecology, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Tungasletta 2, NO-7485 Trondheim, Norway. hans.pedesen@nina.no
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Dec 1;371(1-3):176-89
Date
Dec-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Galliformes - metabolism
Humans
Kidney - metabolism
Liver - metabolism
Metals, Heavy - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Abstract
A circumpolar survey of heavy metals in willow ptarmigan liver and kidney revealed considerable variations in Cd content in Canada and Scandinavia. The Cd content in central Canada was comparable with that in Scandinavia and Russia, at least for kidney. However, in both liver and kidney the median for Canada as a whole was much higher than in the other countries. Some Canadian locations had exceptionally high levels, several birds having >50 mg kg(-1) in liver and >400 mg kg(-1) in kidney. In Norway, the Cd content was highest in central mountain areas in south Norway and inland locations in the two northernmost counties. Five locations in central and north Norway showed mean Cd levels in kidney above 100 mg kg(-1). It is difficult to evaluate regional differences in Sweden, but most locations had the same Cd level as moderately contaminated locations in Norway. Cd levels in Russia were comparable to moderately contaminated locations in the other countries. Due to a high intake of willow, naturally rich in Cd, direct comparison of the Cd level in willow ptarmigan from different locations cannot reveal the effects of long-range pollution. The Pb concentration in willow ptarmigan kidney and liver varied significantly in Norway and Canada, but not in Sweden and Russia. Levels in Sweden and Russia were comparable to those in Canada and low levels in Norway. The highest median value from all locations within countries was found in Norway, both in liver and kidney. The highest Pb content was found in south Norway, indicating an effect of long-range pollution in willow ptarmigan. The level in western Canada was significantly higher than in central Canada. The Hg content in liver varied significantly from one location to another in all the countries and in kidney everywhere except Sweden. In Scandinavia, there is no distinct regional pattern. Canada had a significantly higher Hg level in central than western regions in both tissues the opposite of that found for Cd and Pb. Cu and Zn showed significant variations from one location to another in liver and kidney in Canada and Norway, but only in kidney in samples from Sweden. Comparison between western and central Canada revealed a significant difference for Cu in liver, samples from central Canada having more. There are no significant differences from one country to another, but some localities in Canada seem to have higher Cu concentrations in kidney than are found in Scandinavia and Russia.
PubMed ID
17055034 View in PubMed
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[Action on the body of the gassing of the synthetic polymeric materials used on board ships].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254253
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1973 Nov;17(11):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1973

Aeroallergen analyses and their clinical relevance. II. Sampling by high-volume airsampler with immunochemical quantification versus Burkard pollen trap sampling with morphologic quantification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222940
Source
Allergy. 1992 Oct;47(5):510-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
C R Johnsen
E R Weeke
J. Nielsen
J. Jensen
H. Mosbech
L. Frølund
F. Madsen
L K Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Medical Allergology, National University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 1992 Oct;47(5):510-6
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Allergens - analysis
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - immunology
Immunochemistry
Poaceae - immunology
Pollen - immunology
Radioallergosorbent Test
Spores
Trees - immunology
Abstract
A comparison was made between the amount of airborne pollen collected by Burkard airsampler and the allergenic activity of particles trapped on glass fibre filters in an Accu-Vol high-volume airsampler. The comparison was made throughout the pollen seasons 1986 to 1989. Both airsamplers were operated 24 h a day. They were placed less than 5 m apart, and estimation of the pollen amount was made on a day-to-day basis during the pollen seasons, and on a weekly basis outside the seasons. The occurrence of the 3 clinically most important allergenic types of pollen, birch, grass, and mugwort, was analysed, and close correlations between the 2 sampling techniques were found (rs 0.5-0.8, p
PubMed ID
1485654 View in PubMed
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Airborne hexavalent chromium in southwestern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207835
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 1997 Aug;47(8):905-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
R W Bell
J C Hipfner
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Environment and Energy, Science and Technology Branch, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 1997 Aug;47(8):905-10
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Carcinogens, Environmental - analysis
Chromium - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Ontario
Public Health
Abstract
This study reports the first field measurements of airborne hexavalent chromium (Cr(vi)) in southwestern Ontario. Hexavalent chromium was identified as an inhalation carcinogen and an air toxic of concern during the 1991-93 Windsor Air Quality Study. The results of that study indicated that approximately 20% of the routinely monitored ambient airborne chromium (Cr) was in the hexavalent form. In addition, the range of carcinogenic health risks attributable to airborne Cr(vi) was determined to be between 1.4 x 10(-5) and 3.0 x 10(-4) for people living in the Windsor area. During the summer of 1993, analyses of concurrent indoor and outdoor 24-hour air quality samples taken at 33 residences in Hamilton resulted in geometric mean Cr(vi) concentrations of 0.20 ng/m3 and 0.55 ng/m3, respectively, and little or no relationship between the indoor and outdoor sample sets. During the summer of 1994, an airborne Cr(vi) size-fraction study was conducted in Hamilton, the results of which suggested that the majority of the Cr(vi) was in the inhalable fraction.
PubMed ID
9269134 View in PubMed
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Airborne manganese particulates and methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) at selected outdoor sites in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201701
Source
Neurotoxicology. 1999 Apr-Jun;20(2-3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Zayed
C. Thibault
L. Gareau
G. Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine du travail et d'hygiène du milieu, Faculté de médecine, Montréal, Québec, Canada. zayedj@erc.umontreal.ca
Source
Neurotoxicology. 1999 Apr-Jun;20(2-3):151-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Canada
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Manganese - analysis
Organometallic Compounds - analysis
Sampling Studies
Abstract
This study aims to assess the atmospheric concentrations of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), respirable manganese (MNR) and total manganese (MnT) in certain specific microenvironments and to provide an estimation of human exposure to MnR. Sampling was carried out in five microenvironments: a gas station, an underground car park, downtown Montreal, near an expressway and near an oil refinery. The samples were collected using Gil-Air portable pumps during three days and were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The mean concentrations of MnR, MnT and MMT were 0.036 microgram m-3, 0.103 microgram m-3 and 0.005 microgram m-3 respectively. The MnR/MnT ratios vary from 25% to 43% (mean 35%) while the MMT/MnT ratios averaged about 5%. Furthermore, the mean concentration of the MnR measured near the expressway (0.053 microgram m-3) is similar to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) reference concentration (RfC = 0.05 microgram m-3). The average daily environmental exposure dose to MNR is estimated at 0.010 microgram kg-1 d-1 and its contribution to the multimedia exposure (air, food and water) is low. The overall results show a lack of potential exposure to MMT and substantial concentrations of MnR near an expressway.
PubMed ID
10385879 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution and cancer. A review of experimental studies]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27038
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Jun 7;144(23):1719-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-1982

Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217580
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
B R Stern
M E Raizenne
R T Burnett
L. Jones
J. Kearney
C A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sulfates - analysis
Abstract
This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF25-75), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V50max). The 1986 annual mean of the 1-hr daily maxima of ozone was higher in Ontario (46.3 ppb) than in Saskatchewan (34.1 ppb), with 90th percentile concentrations of 80 ppb in Ontario and 47 ppb in Saskatchewan. Summertime 1-hr daily maxima means were 69.0 ppb in Ontario and 36.1 ppb in Saskatchewan. Annual mean and 90th percentile concentrations of inhalable sulfates were three times higher in Ontario than in Saskatchewan; there were no significant differences in levels of inhalable particles (PM10) or particulate nitrates. Levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were low in both regions. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education, and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P 0.05).
PubMed ID
8055835 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily emergency department visits for depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153438
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2009;22(4):355-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian H Rowe
Ian Colman
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2009;22(4):355-62
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Meteorological Concepts
Risk factors
Urban Population
Abstract
To investigate the potential correlation between ambient air pollution exposure and emergency department (ED) visits for depression.
A hierarchical clusters design was used to study 27 047 ED visits for depression in six cities in Canada. The data used in the analysis contain the dates of visits, daily numbers of diagnosed visits, and daily mean concentrations of air pollutants as well as the meteorological factors. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to data analysis. Poisson models were fitted to the clustered counts of ED visits with a single air pollutant, temperature and relative humidity.
Statistically significant positive correlations were observed between the number of ED visits for depression and the air concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and particulate matter (PM10). The percentage increase in daily ED visits was 15.5% (95% CI: 8.0-23.5) for CO per 0.8 ppm and 20.0% (95% CI: 13.3-27.2) for NO2 per 20.1 ppb, for same day exposure in the warm weather period (April-September). For PM10, the largest increase, 7.2% (95% CI: 3.0-11.6) per 19.4 ug/m3, was observed for the cold weather period (October-March).
The results support the hypothesis that ED visits for depressive disorder correlate with ambient air pollution, and that a large majority of this pollution results from combustion of fossil fuels (e.g. in motor vehicles).
PubMed ID
20197262 View in PubMed
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527 records – page 1 of 53.