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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Adult asthma and traffic exposure at residential address, workplace address, and self-reported daily time outdoor in traffic: A two-stage case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139159
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:716
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Anna Lindgren
Jonas Björk
Emilie Stroh
Kristina Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Sweden. anna.lindgren@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:716
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation
Young Adult
Abstract
Most epidemiologic studies use traffic at residential address as a surrogate for total traffic exposure when investigating effects of traffic on respiratory health. This study used GIS (Geographical Information Systems) to estimate traffic exposure, not only on residential, but also on workplace address, in addition to survey questions on time spent in traffic during commuting or other daily activities.The aim was to investigate 1) if there is an association between traffic exposure and prevalence of adult asthma and asthma symptoms, and 2) if so, does this association become stronger using more complete traffic exposure information.
This study was conducted in two stages: A first cross-sectional survey in Southern Sweden 2004 (n = 24819, 18-80 years, response rate 59%) was followed by a case-control study in 2005 to obtain more detailed exposure and confounder information (n = 2856, asthmatics and controls (1:3), 86% response rate). In the first survey, only residential address was known. In the second survey, questions about workplace addresses and daily time spent in traffic were also included. Residential and workplace addresses were geocoded and linked with GIS to road data and dispersion modelled outdoor concentrations of NOx (annual mean, 250 × 250 m resolution).
Living within 50 m of a road (measured by GIS) with traffic intensity of >10 cars/minute (compared with no road within this distance) was associated with an increased prevalence of asthma, (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = (1.1-2.8), and with asthma symptoms last 12 months. No statistically significant effects were seen for traffic exposure at workplace address, daily time spent in traffic, or commuting time to work, after adjustment for confounders. A combined total exposure estimate did not give a stronger association with asthma prevalence or asthma symptoms.
Traffic exposure at close proximity to residential address showed association with asthma prevalence and asthma symptoms last 12 months, among adults in southern Sweden. The associations were not stronger when accounting for total traffic exposure. This could reflect exposure misclassfication at workplace address and for other daily time in traffic, but also that residential address remains the main determinant for traffic exposure among adults.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21092159 View in PubMed
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Airborne chemicals cause respiratory symptoms in individuals with contact allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176079
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
J. Elberling
A. Linneberg
H. Mosbech
A. Dirksen
T. Menné
N H Nielsen
F. Madsen
L. Frølund
J Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
The National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermatology, Gentofte University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. jeel@gentoftehosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Feb;52(2):65-72
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Tests - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Exposure to fragrance chemicals causes various eye and airway symptoms. Individuals with perfume contact allergy report these symptoms more frequently than individuals with nickel allergy or no contact allergies. However, the associations between contact allergy and respiratory symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals other than perfumes are unclear. The study aimed to investigate the association between eye and airway symptoms elicited by airborne chemicals (other than perfumes) and contact allergy in a population-based sample. A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms was posted, in 2002, to 1189 individuals who participated in 1997/1998 in a Danish population-based study of allergic diseases. Questions about eye and airway symptoms elicited by different airborne chemicals and airborne proteins were included in the questionnaire. Data from the questionnaire were compared with data on patch testing and prick testing. Having at least 1 positive patch test (adjusted odds ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.5) was associated with the symptoms, and the odds ratio increased with the number of positive patch tests (P-value for test for trend
PubMed ID
15725282 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and cardiac arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179578
Source
Inhal Toxicol. 2004 Jun;16(6-7):353-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Sverre Vedal
Kira Rich
Michael Brauer
Rick White
John Petkau
Author Affiliation
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado 80246, USA. vedals@njc.org
Source
Inhal Toxicol. 2004 Jun;16(6-7):353-62
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Defibrillators, Implantable
Electric Countershock - instrumentation
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meteorological Concepts
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between short-term increases in outdoor air pollution concentrations and adverse cardiovascular effects, including cardiac mortality and hospitalizations. One possible mechanism behind this association is that air pollution exposure increases the risk of developing a cardiac arrhythmia. To investigate this hypothesis, dates of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) discharges were abstracted from patient records in patients attending the two ICD clinics in Vancouver, BC, for the years 1997-2000. Daily outdoor air pollutant concentrations and daily meteorological data from the Vancouver region were obtained for the same 4-yr period. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the association between short-term increases in air pollutant concentrations and ICD discharges while controlling for temporal trends, meteorology, and serial correlation in the data. Air pollution concentrations in the Vancouver region were relatively low from 1997 to 2000, as expected. In the 50 patients who resided within the Vancouver region and who experienced at least 1 ICD discharge during the period of follow-up, no significant associations between increased air pollution concentrations and increased ICD discharges were present. When the patient sample was restricted to the 16 patients who had at least 6 months of follow-up and experienced a rate of at least 2 days with ICD discharges per year, there was a statistically significant association between increased sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration and ICD discharge 2 days after the SO(2) increase. When stratified by season, no associations between increased air pollutant concentrations and increased risk of ICD discharge were observed in the summer, although for several pollutants, concentration increases were associated with a decrease in ICD discharges. In the winter, increased SO(2) concentrations again were seen to be associated with increased risk of ICD discharge, at both 2 and 3 days following increases in SO(2) concentrations. These findings provide no compelling evidence that short-term increases in relatively low concentrations of outdoor air pollutants have an adverse effect on individuals at risk of cardiac arrhythmias. The findings regarding SO(2) are difficult to interpret. They may be chance findings. Alternatively, given the very low concentrations of SO(2) that were present in Vancouver, SO(2) may have been serving as a surrogate measure of other environmental or meteorological factors.
PubMed ID
15204751 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily ED visits for migraine and headache in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150066
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2009 May;27(4):391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
David M Stieb
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A OK9. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2009 May;27(4):391-6
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Alberta - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Weather
Abstract
A variety of environmental factors have been identified as possible triggers for migraine and other headache syndromes.
We analyzed associations between air pollution and emergency department (ED) visits for migraine and headache.
Analysis was based on 56,241 ED visits for migraine and 48,022 ED visits for headache to Edmonton hospitals between 1992 and 2002. A Poisson model of counts hierarchically clustered by day of week, month, and year was applied using generalized linear mixed models. Temperature and relative humidity were included as covariates.
Females accounted for 78.5% of migraine visits and 56.3% of headache visits. An interquartile range (IQR) increase (6.2 microg/m3) in daily average particulate matter of median aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) was associated with increases in visits of 3.3% for migraine (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.6-6.0), lagged 2 days, and 3.4% for headache (95% CI: 0.3-6.6), lagged 0 days, among females in the cold season (October-March). PM2.5 was also associated with cold season migraine visits among females at lag 0 and 1 day (P
PubMed ID
19555607 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Windsor, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176397
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
Karen Y Fung
Isaac Luginaah
Kevin M Gorey
Greg Webster
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4. kfung@uwindsor.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):29-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Precipitating Factors
Risk
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Weather
Abstract
To examine the role that ambient air pollution plays in exacerbating cardiovascular disease hospitalization in Windsor, Ontario.
The number of daily cardiac hospital admissions was obtained from all Windsor hospitals from April 1, 1995 to December 31, 2000 and linked to concentrations of ambient air pollutants and weather variables. The logarithm of daily counts of hospitalization was regressed on the levels of pollutants, after adjusting for seasonal, weekly cycles, and weather variables using time series analysis with natural splines as smoothing functions.
Of all the pollutants considered, sulphur dioxide (SO2) had the strongest effect on cardiac hospitalization among the > or = 65 age group. The percentage increase in daily admission was 2.6% for current day sulphur dioxide level (95% CI: 0.5-6.4), 4.0% for 2-day mean level (95% CI: 0.1-6.9), and 5.6% (95% CI: 1.5-9.9) for 3-day mean level for an increase in interquartile range of 19.3 ppb. When particulate PM10 was included in the model, the contributing effect of sulphur dioxide remained significant for the > or = 65 age group for all three levels.
Short-term effects of sulphur dioxide are associated significantly to daily cardiac hospital admissions for people > or = 65 years of age living in Windsor. Since Windsor is a border city, additional monitoring and assessment is recommended to determine if air quality and resultant health effects have deteriorated since traffic congestion at the border has increased following the events of September 11, 2001.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15682690 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for chest pain and weakness in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143778
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian Rowe
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Chest Pain - chemically induced
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - chemically induced
Female
Humans
Humidity
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Temperature
Young Adult
Abstract
Chest pain or weakness can be first signal of health problems. Many studies demonstrate that these conditions can be related to air pollution. This work uses time-series data to investigate the association.
This is a study of 68,714 emergency department (ED) visits for chest pain (ICD-9: 786) and of 66,092 ED visits for weakness (ICD-9: 780). The hierarchical method was applied to analyse the associations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain and weakness (separately) and the levels of the air pollutants and meteorological variables. The counts of visits for all patients, males and females were analysed separately by whole period (I-XII), warm (IV-IX) and cold (X-III).
The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the interquartile range (IQR) for the pollutant. Chest pain: 2.4% (95% CI: 1.0-3.9) for CO, females, I-XII; 3.8% (95% CI: 0.0-7.8) for NO(2), males, IV-IX; 4.5% (95% CI: 0.9-8.3) for O(3) (1-day lagged), males, IV-IX; 2.8% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2), for PM(10), males, X-III; 2.0% (95% CI: 0.0-4.0), for SO(2), females, X-III; 2.1% (95% CI: 0.2-4.0) for PM(2.5), all, X-III. Weakness: 2.1% (95% CI: 0.4-3.7) for CO (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 3.4% (95% CI: 1.0-5.9) for NO(2) (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 2.4% (95% CI: 0.9-3.9) for SO(2), females, I-XII; 4.6% (95% CI: 1.0-8.2) for O(3) (1-day lagged), females, IV-IX.
Obtained findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for chest pain and weakness are associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
20442058 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for depression in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160867
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):241-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):241-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Databases as Topic
Depression
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Temperature
Abstract
Depression is a common cause of morbidity. Sufferers are very sensitive to many external factors. Emergency department (ED) visits for this condition can be associated with the concentration of ambient air pollutants. The study objective was to examine and assess the associations between ED visits for depression and ambient air pollution.
The present study analyzed 15,556 ED visits for depression (ICD-9: 311) at Edmonton hospitals between 1992 and 2002. The data were clustered based on the triplet {year, month, day of the week}. The generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) technique was used to regress the logarithm of the clustered counts for ED visits for depression on the levels of air pollutants (CO, NO2, SO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5) and the meteorological variables. The number of ED visits for depression was analyzed separately for all patients, and males and females. An analysis by season was also conducted: for the whole year (I-XII), warm season (IV-IX), and cold season (X-III).
After adjusting for temperature and relative humidity, the following increments in daily depression-related ED visits could be noted: 6.9% (95% CI: 1.3, 12.9) for carbon monoxide (CO) for all patients in warm season; 7.4% (95% CI: 0.5, 14.8) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for female patients in warm season; 4.5% (95% CI: 0.1, 9.1) for sulphur dioxide (SO2) for female patients in warm season; 6.9% (95% CI: 0.6, 13.6) for ground level ozone (O3, 1-day lagged) for female patients in warm season; 7.2% (95% CI: 2.7, 12.0) for particulate matter (PM10) for females in cold season; and 7.2% (95% CI: 2.0, 12.8) for particulate matter (PM2.5) for females in cold season.
The findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for depression are associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
17932013 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for ischemic heart disease in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162394
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(2):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(2):167-73
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - toxicity
Cluster analysis
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We examined the associations between emergency department (ED) visits for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and short-term elevations in ambient air pollutants (CO and NO(2)).
A hierarchical clusters design was used to study ED visits (n = 4979) for ischemic heart disease (ICD-9: 410-414) that occurred at a Montreal hospital between 1997 and 2002. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to create Poisson models for the clustered counts of ED visits for IHD. The analysis was done by gender for two age categories, all patients and patients aged over 64 years.
The results are presented as an excess risk increase associated with the interquartile range (IQR) of daily average of the pollutant concentration. The results for NO(2) (IQR = 9.5 ppb) were 5.9% (95% CI: 2.1-9.9) for all patients and 6.2% (95% CI: 1.2-11.4) for males; for patients aged over 64: 7.1% (95% CI: 2.5-11.9) for all patients, 9.1% (95% CI: 2.8-15.7) for males, and 6.5% (95% CI: 0.7-12.7) for females (for exposure lagged by 1-day). The results for CO (IQR = 0.2 ppm): 5.4% (95% CI: 2.3-8.5) for all patients, and 7.5% (95% CI: 3.6-11.6) for males. For patients aged over 64 years, 4.9% (95% CI: 1.3-8.7) for all patients, and 7.5% (95% CI: 2.6-12.6) for males. The results show the associations for the same day exposures.
The short-term effects of nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide are associated significantly with daily ED visits for ischemic heart disease. For NO(2) the associations are stronger for patients aged over 64 years. As indicated by our results, it is likely that vehicular traffic, a producer of NO(2) and CO, contributes to an increased number of ED visits for IHD.
PubMed ID
17638683 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18199
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2003
Author
Anna Bessö
Fredrik Nyberg
Göran Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.besso@imm.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Date
Nov-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the importance of exposure to ambient air pollution for lung cancer risk, we conducted a case-control study in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter. The smelter started operations in 1930 and had very high emissions during the early decades, particularly of arsenic and SO(2). Among subjects deceased 1961-1990 in the municipality where the smelter is located and who had not worked at the smelter, 209 male and 107 female lung cancer cases were identified and matched by sex and year of birth to 518 and 209 controls, respectively. Information on smoking habits, occupations and residences was collected by questionnaire to next-of-kin and from registry data. Living close to the smelter was associated with a relative risk (RR) for lung cancer of 1.38 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-2.14] among men, adjusted for smoking and occupational exposures. No clear difference in risk was detected for men deceased 1961-1979 compared to men deceased 1980-1990 (RR point estimates 1.42 and 1.29, respectively). There appeared to be an increased risk especially for men exposed in the beginning of the operations (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.90-2.54), in particular combined with exposure duration shorter than 20 years (RR = 2.52, 95% CI 0.89-7.11). For women, however, no overall increased risk for lung cancer was observed. Although not significant, our findings thus indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among men living close to the nonferrous smelter. This increase appeared to concern primarily men exposed during the early years of operations, when emissions were very high.
PubMed ID
14506746 View in PubMed
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