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Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16521
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
C. Jansson
N. Plato
A L V Johansson
O. Nyrén
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Catarina.Jansson@meb.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb;63(2):107-12
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Cardia
Epidemiologic Methods
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. METHODS: In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. CONCLUSIONS: Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance.
PubMed ID
16421388 View in PubMed
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Asphalt fumes: exposure to PAH and amines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200583
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Sep;Suppl 1:147-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999

[Assessment of carcinogenic risks to workers of the main enterprises of the Irkutsk region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290289
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1163-7
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
N V Efimova
V S Rukavishnikov
V A Pankov
A N Perezhogin
S F Shayakhmetov
N M Meshchakova
L G Lisetskaya
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1163-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Carcinogenesis - chemically induced
Carcinogens, Environmental - analysis - toxicity
Chromium - analysis - toxicity
Formaldehyde - analysis - toxicity
Humans
Manufacturing Industry - methods - standards
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Time
Vinyl Chloride - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
The purpose of research is the assessment of the individual cancer risk (ICR) for workers of the basic occupations in key branches of industry of the Irkutsk region. There was executed the calculation of ICR levels for workers of the basic occupations of the aircraft industry, aluminum smelters and vinyl chloride production plants. The estimation of the exposure for workers was carried out according to long-term time-weighted average concentrations in the air of the working area, for the population - on annual average concentrations in the ambient air. To assess the risk that is not associated with the profession, the dose was calculated for the period of life (70 years). When calculating the toxicant doses in the working area there were used the “standard” indices ofpulmonary ventilation for adults, body weight, the work experience in the contact with carcinogens of 30 years, the number of days in the contact of 240, the duration of the working time 8 or 12 hours (in accordance with the working hours) duration. ICR for the Irkutsk population amounted of 3.08E-04, in Shelekhov - 4.8E-05, Sayansk - 1.1E-05. The amount of risk depends on the content offormaldehyde in all territories and chromium VI in cities of Irkutsk and Shelekhov. ICR for workers of basic occupations of studied plants in dozens of times are higher than for the urban population. Priority carcinogens are: chromium VI, nickel, formaldehyde, silicon dioxide -for the aircraft plant employees; 1,2-dichloretan, vinyl chloride - for the workers of vinyl chloride production plant; benzopyrene - for the aluminum smelter workers.
PubMed ID
29446294 View in PubMed
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Biological activities of respirable dust from Eastern Canadian peat moss factories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144167
Source
Toxicol In Vitro. 2010 Jun;24(4):1273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Valérie Létourneau
Anne Mériaux
Nicole Goyer
Jamila Chakir
Yvon Cormier
Caroline Duchaine
Author Affiliation
Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec (Hôpital Laval), 2725 chemin Sainte-Foy, Québec, Canada G1V 4G5. valerie.letourneau@criucpq.ulaval.ca
Source
Toxicol In Vitro. 2010 Jun;24(4):1273-8
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Canada
Cell Line
Colony Count, Microbial
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - analysis - toxicity
Environmental monitoring
Fungi - classification - isolation & purification
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Quartz - analysis
Respiratory Mucosa - drug effects
Sphagnopsida
Spores, Fungal
Toxicity Tests - methods
Abstract
Bacteria, moulds, endotoxin and quartz from respirable dust of agricultural and industrial buildings are typically incriminated for the respiratory health decline of exposed workers despite that dust being an undefined mixture and quantification methods of aerosolized bacteria, moulds or endotoxin not being standardized yet. We developed an in vitro alveolar epithelial cell system in which biological activities of peat moss factories' dust might be correlated to bacteria, mould, endotoxin and quartz concentrations of the analyzed samples. Following exposure, interleukin-8 protein secretion, necrosis and apoptosis of the exposed A549 cells were monitored respectively with ELISA on cell supernatants, trypan blue exclusion and DNA fragmentation detection by flow cytometry. Respirable dust was collected with liquid impingers and respirable quartz with 10mm Dorr-Oliver cyclones. We quantified mesophilic bacteria, mesophilic moulds and endotoxins from liquid impinger samples. No correlation was observed between biological activities of dust and bacteria, mould, endotoxin or quartz concentrations under our experimental conditions. Our speculation is that simple measurements, such as dust concentrations, may not be adequate indicators of the human respiratory health hazard for a given environment.
PubMed ID
20398748 View in PubMed
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Biological monitoring of dermal and air exposure to cobalt at a Swedish hard metal production plant: does dermal exposure contribute to uptake?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291746
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2017 Oct; 77(4):201-207
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Maria Klasson
Magnus Lindberg
Ing-Liss Bryngelsson
Helena Arvidsson
Carin Pettersson
Bente Husby
Håkan Westberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University, 701 85, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2017 Oct; 77(4):201-207
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Cobalt - analysis - blood - toxicity
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology
Humans
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Skin - drug effects - metabolism
Sweden
Abstract
Occupational exposure to cobalt is well established in hard metal manufacture. Cobalt is known to cause contact allergy, asthma, hard metal lung disease, and lung cancer. The relationship between skin exposure and uptake determined in blood has not been extensively investigated.
To examine whether skin and inhalable air exposure to cobalt contributes to uptake, determined as cobalt in blood, in a hard metal manufacturing factory.
The amount of cobalt on the skin found with an acid wash technique, the air concentrations of inhalable cobalt and cobalt blood concentrations were determined and correlated in exposed workers.
We found a significant rank correlation for cobalt concentrations on the skin, in inhalable air, and in blood (0.376-0.498). Multiple linear regression showed significant regression coefficients for cobalt skin exposure and blood (B?=?0.01, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28675438 View in PubMed
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[Chemical elements in human hair as indicators of occupational and environmental pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229568
Source
Gig Sanit. 1990 Mar;(3):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
B A Revich
Source
Gig Sanit. 1990 Mar;(3):55-9
Date
Mar-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Child
Child, Preschool
Hair - analysis
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Metallurgy - standards
Metals - analysis - toxicity
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Pollution of occupational and atmospheric air could be evaluated by means of bioindicators, such as human hair. There was developed a system of biomonitoring tested in various cities of the country. Basic principles of the changes in trace elemental structure of workers' hair at different production plants and the hair of the population living near pollution sources were determined.
PubMed ID
2143493 View in PubMed
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[Clinical, biochemical and allergological indices characterizing occupational diseases of the bronchial and pulmonary system in employees at aluminium production].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290294
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1142-5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
I V Kudaeva
O A Dyakovich
E A Beygel
L B Masnavieva
O V Naumova
L A Budarina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1142-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Aluminum - analysis - toxicity
Asthma, Occupational - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Biomarkers - analysis
Chemical Industry - methods - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - blood - chemically induced - diagnosis
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
There are many harmful factors that possess a damaging impact on the body of employees at aluminum production. It leads to the development of bronchial asthma (BA), chronic nonobstructive bronchitis (CNB) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The pathogenesis of these disorders, as well as sensitizing effect offluorine in the aluminum production is not fully understood. The purpose of this work was to study the characteristics of laboratory indices in patients with occupational diseases of the respiratory system. In workers of aluminum production with the diagnosis of occupational diseases of respiratory system (15 patients with a diagnosis of asthma, 30 CNB cases, 20 COPD patients) we evaluated the content of total protein, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), total calcium, phosphorus, ceruloplasmin, hematological indices and performed emigration of leukocytes braking test (TTEEL). Clinical and biochemical profile ofpersons with occupational asthma was characterized by a low level of total calcium and ceruloplasmin, a high concentration of phosphorus in the blood serum and inhibition of leukocyte emigration in the test with sodium fluoride. For aluminum production CNB workers characteristic active proatherogenic process was pronounced by a decrease in the HDLC level and an increase in atherogenic index; higher hematocrit value and concentration of erythrocytes, and more than 50% of cases of sensitization to the presence of sodium fluoride. COPD cases had occupational lower average concentration of hemoglobin in the erythrocyte, total protein in serum, as well as polymorphic variant response to sodium fluoride in the form of a depression and activation of leucocytes emigration.
PubMed ID
29446284 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.