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Acute effects of ambient inhalable particles in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205834
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Apr;157(4 Pt 1):1034-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
S. Vedal
J. Petkau
R. White
J. Blair
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Apr;157(4 Pt 1):1034-43
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - physiopathology
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - physiopathology
Male
Meteorological Concepts
Particle Size
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Respiratory Mechanics
Vital Capacity
Wood
Abstract
Although increases in inhalable particle (PM10) concentrations have been associated with acute reductions in the level of lung function and increased symptom reporting in children, including children with asthma, it is not clear whether these effects occur largely in asthmatic children, or even whether asthmatic children are more likely to experience these effects than children without asthma. To address these points, the following subgroups of children were selected from a survey population of all 2,200 elementary school children (6 to 13 yr of age) in a pulp mill community on the west coast of Vancouver Island: (1) all children with physician-diagnosed asthma (n = 75 participated), (2) all children with an exercise-induced fall in FEV1 without diagnosed asthma (n = 57), (3) all children with airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC
PubMed ID
9563716 View in PubMed
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Acute health effects common during graffiti removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50823
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S. Langworth
H. Anundi
L. Friis
G. Johanson
M L Lind
E. Söderman
B A Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. sven.langworth@pharmacia.com
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Collection - methods
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Irritants - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify possible health effects caused by different cleaning agents used in graffiti removal. METHODS: In 38 graffiti removers working 8-h shifts in the Stockholm underground system, the exposure to organic solvents was assessed by active air sampling, biological monitoring, and by interviews and a questionnaire. Health effects were registered, by physical examinations, porta7ble spirometers and self-administered questionnaires. The prevalence of symptoms was compared with 49 controls working at the underground depots, and with 177 population controls. RESULTS: The 8-h time-weighted average exposures (TWA) were low, below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents. The short-term exposures occasionally exceeded the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL), especially during work in poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators. The graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of tiredness and upper airway symptoms compared with the depot controls, and significantly more tiredness, headaches and symptoms affecting airways, eyes and skin than the population controls. Among the graffiti removers, some of the symptoms increased during the working day. On a group basis, the lung function registrations showed normal values. However, seven workers displayed a clear reduction of peak expiratory flow (PEF) over the working shift. CONCLUSIONS: Though their average exposure to organic solvents was low, the graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of unspecific symptoms such as fatigue and headache as well as irritative symptoms from the eyes and respiratory tract, compared with the controls. To prevent adverse health effects it is important to inform the workers about the health risks, and to restrict use of the most hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, it is important to develop good working practices and to encourage the use of personal protective equipment.
PubMed ID
11355296 View in PubMed
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Acute myeloid leukemia among petrol station attendants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23990
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1993 Jul-Aug;48(4):255-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Jakobsson
A. Ahlbom
T. Bellander
I. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Health, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1993 Jul-Aug;48(4):255-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Benzene - adverse effects - analysis
Confidence Intervals
Environmental monitoring
Gasoline - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) within different occupations was studied, using occupational information obtained from the Swedish 1970 census. Follow-up in the Swedish Cancer Register was carried out from 1971 to 1984. Among male petrol station attendants, 10 cases were observed versus 2.8 expected (observed/expected = 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.7-6.6). For several decades, Swedish petrol has contained 3-5% of benzene. Thus, a hypothesis was that benzene had contributed to the excess risk. The work histories of the 10 cases were reconstructed through interviews with surviving relatives and were compatible with the hypothesis. However, because the air benzene exposures at petrol stations always have been lower than benzene exposures associated previously with an increased risk of AML, the leukemogenic effect of benzene may have been potentiated by other petrol or vehicle exhaust components.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Environ Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;51(6):469-719012330
PubMed ID
8357276 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects living near a coal-fired plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240980
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Pershagen
Z. Hrubec
U. Lorich
P. Rönnqvist
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Coal - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - analysis
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Daily symptom rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects with presumed high sensitivity to air pollution who lived near a coal-fired plant were compared with 24-hr ambient air concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, soot, and suspended particles as well as with emissions from the plant. The mean concentrations of each of the pollutants during the 4-month study period were below 30 micrograms/m3, and no single 24-hr concentration exceeded 100 micrograms/m3. There were no consistent associations between plant emissions and pollutant levels or between these two variables and daily symptom rates. The results indicate that the coal-fired plant was not of major importance for the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms in the surrounding population.
PubMed ID
6712282 View in PubMed
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Airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel: trichloramine exposure, exhaled NO and protein profiling of nasal lavage fluids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123142
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Louise Fornander
Bijar Ghafouri
Mats Lindahl
Pål Graff
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):571-80
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Biological Markers - metabolism
Chlorides - adverse effects - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Female
Humans
Immunoblotting
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Nitrogen Compounds - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Prevalence
Proteome - metabolism
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Risk factors
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Sweden - epidemiology
Swimming Pools
Abstract
Occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel was investigated. The aims of this study were to assess trichloramine exposure levels and exhaled nitric oxide in relation to the prevalence of airway symptoms in swimming pool facilities and to determine protein effects in the upper respiratory tract.
The presence of airway symptoms related to work was examined in 146 individuals working at 46 indoor swimming pool facilities. Levels of trichloramine, as well as exhaled nitric oxide, were measured in five facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation and four facilities with no airway irritation among the personnel. Nasal lavage fluid was collected, and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.
17 % of the swimming pool personnel reported airway symptoms related to work. The levels of trichloramine in the swimming pool facilities ranged from 0.04 to 0.36 mg/m(3). There was no covariance between trichloramine levels, exhaled nitric oxide and prevalence of airway symptoms. Protein profiling of the nasal lavage fluid showed that the levels alpha-1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin were significantly higher, and S100-A8 was significantly lower in swimming pool personnel.
This study confirms the occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel. Our results indicate altered levels of innate immunity proteins in the upper airways that may pose as potential biomarkers. However, swimming pool facilities with high prevalence of airway irritation could not be explained by higher trichloramine exposure levels. Further studies are needed to clarify the environmental factors in indoor swimming pools that cause airway problems and affect the immune system.
PubMed ID
22729567 View in PubMed
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An analysis of occupational blood lead trends in Manitoba, 1979 through 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226244
Source
Am J Public Health. 1991 Jun;81(6):736-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
A. Yassi
M. Cheang
M. Tenenbein
G. Bawden
J. Spiegel
T. Redekop
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1991 Jun;81(6):736-40
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - standards
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Lead Poisoning - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Longitudinal Studies
Manitoba - epidemiology
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Diseases - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Population Surveillance
Abstract
While regulations for workplace lead exposure become more strict, their effectiveness in decreasing blood lead concentrations and the method by which this is attained have not been evaluated.
An analysis was conducted of 10,190 blood lead samples from employees of 10 high-risk workplaces collected in Manitoba, 1979-87, as part of regulated occupational surveillance.
A significant decrease in blood lead concentrations was observed overall as well as for each individual company. A 1979 government regulation to reduce blood lead to below 3.38 mumol/L (70 micrograms/dl) was followed by a drop in blood lead concentrations; a 1983 order to reduce blood leads to below 2.90 mumol/L (60 micrograms/dl) was not followed by such a drop. Longitudinal analysis by individual workers suggested that companies were complying by use of administrative control, i.e., removing workers to lower lead areas until blood lead levels had fallen, then returning them to high lead areas.
Focusing upon blood lead as the sole criterion for compliance is not effective; regulations must specifically require environmental monitoring and controls. Biological surveillance serves as "back-up" to environmental surveillance and this database illustrates the usefulness of a comprehensive centralized surveillance system.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Aug;77(8):1006-83605466
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 1988 Summer;9(2):198-2213417861
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1989 Aug 1;111(3):238-442751181
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1989 Sep;46(9):593-62675956
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Jul 23;317(4):214-83600713
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Dec;79 Suppl:9-112817212
Cites: Clin Chem. 1975 Apr;21(4):558-611116290
Cites: Medicine (Baltimore). 1983 Jul;62(4):221-476410150
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1986 Nov;76(11):1299-3022945445
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Dec;79 Suppl:46-522530908
PubMed ID
2029043 View in PubMed
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[A quantitative assessment of health risk induced by occupational exposure to inorganic arsenic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22255
Source
Med Pr. 1997;48(6):651-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
W. Szymczak
Author Affiliation
Zakladu Epidemiologii Srodowiskowej Instytutu Medycyny Pracy, Lodzi.
Source
Med Pr. 1997;48(6):651-62
Date
1997
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Arsenic - adverse effects - analysis
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
English Abstract
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The risk of neoplastic disease, primarily lung cancer, induced by occupational, inhalation exposure to nonorganic arsenic was assessed. In order to identify individual risk in the linear dose-response relationship which would serve as a basis for the risk assessment among persons exposed occupationally, the author also analysed the latest epidemiological studies performed in Sweden, as well as repeated analyses of American studies. This allowed to diminish individual risk by several times. It is thought that a diminished value of individual risk is, in the light of the most up-to-date epidemiological studies, closer to the reality than the value proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Having the value of individual risk related to occupational exposure, equal 1.79 x 10(-4), lung cancer risk after forty years of employment under the exposure level within the range of currently binding MAC values for arsenic (0.05 mg/m3) accounts for 8.95 x 10(-3), thus slightly exceeding the adopted value of 1 x 10(3). Whereas a new value, proposed by the Expert Group for Chemical Factors of the International Commission for Updating the list of MAC and MAI values in 1996, equals 0.01, so the risk for a forty-year employment accounts for 1.79 x 10(-3), in fact the value corresponding to that already approved. In addition, the assessment indicated that smoking increases by 4-6 times the risk of lung cancer induced by exposure to arsenic.
PubMed ID
9558633 View in PubMed
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Asbestos: scientific basis for environmental control of fibres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246326
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):737-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
E D Acheson
M J Gardner
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1980;(30):737-54
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - prevention & control
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
New Jersey
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Probability
Quebec
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
Any review of the scientific evidence on which public policy is based must commence with a cautionary statement about the quality of the available data both about dust and about asbestos-related disease. Attention is drawn to some of the main problems. It is concluded that, in spite of their shortcomings, the data are sufficiently consistent to be useful in relation to some aspects of the problem of environmental control of the asbestos hazard. The question whether or not there is a threshold dose of fibre below which no biological effect occurs is of considerable importance in framing public policy. The evidence concerning the existence or otherwise of a threshold in relation to the different asbestos-related diseases is summarized. A summary is also given of the evidence about the shape of the dose-response curves for asbestos-related diseases in man. The paper concludes with a note on how scientific data may be summarized in a manner which may be helpful in formulating public policy with regard to a control limit.
PubMed ID
7228330 View in PubMed
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[ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT OF THE CHEMICAL RISK AND ITS PREVENTION IN MANUFACTURE OF REFRACTORIES USING ORGANIC BINDER].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265734
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Mar-Apr;94(2):57-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
O G Drugova
O F Roslyi
S B Ust'iantsev
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 Mar-Apr;94(2):57-60
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Health
Prevalence
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Assessment of the occupational chemical risk of new industries and the development of measures for its mitigation is a priority task to ensure chemical safety in Russia. There was performed the assessment of the chemical risk in the manufacture of new types of refractories--periclase-carbon refractories, using organic binder) on the base of data of hygiene studies, indices of morbidity rates in workers and also of the investigation of the impact of such refractory dust on laboratory animals (intratracheal introduction). The main factors for chemical risk to the workers' health are magnesium oxide, volatile products of phenol-formaldehyde resins, silicon-containing dust, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and in the use of a binder "Carbores"--benzo (a) pyrene and pitch cokes of the carbon dust. In employees of such industry there is recorded the elevated morbidity rate of diseases of upper respiratory rates. Dust of this type has on the body of animals general toxic and mild fibrogenic effect. According to the results of the assessment of the chemical risk measures have been developed for its mitigation in the workplace.
PubMed ID
26155647 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.