Skip header and navigation

Refine By

354 records – page 1 of 36.

The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: development from 1904 and mortality to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210233
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F D Liddell
A D McDonald
J C McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper draws together the mortality experience for a cohort of some 11000 male Quebec Chrysotile miners and millers, reported at intervals since 1971 and now again updated. Of the 10918 men in the complete cohort, 1138 were lost to view, almost all never traced after employment of only a month or two before 1935; the other 9780 men were traced into 1992. Of these, 8009 (82%) are known to have died: 657 from lung cancer, 38 from mesotheliona, 1205 from other malignant disease, 108 from pneumoconiosis and 561 from other non-malignant respiratory diseases (excluding tuberculosis). After early fluctuations. SMRs (all causes) against Quebec rates have been reasonably steady since about 1945. For men first employed in Asbestos, mine or factory, they were very much what might have been expected for a blue collar population without any hazardous exposure. SMRs in the Thetford Mines area were almost 8% higher, but in line with anecdotal evidence concerning socio-economic status. At exposures below 300 (million particles per cubic foot) x years, (mpcf.y), equivalent to roughly 1000 (fibres/ml) x years-or, say, 10 years in the 1940s at 80 (fibres/ml)-findings were as follows. There were no discernible associations of degree of exposure and SMRs, whether for all causes of death or for all the specific cancer sites examined. The average SMRs were 1.07 (all causes), and 1.16, 0.93, 1.03 and 1.21, respectively, for gastric, other abdominal, laryngeal and lung cancer. Men whose exposures were less then 300 mpcf.y suffered almost one-half of the 146 deaths from pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma; the elimination of these two causes would have reduced these men's SMR (all causes) from 1.07 to approximately 1.06. Thus it is concluded from the viewpoint of mortality that exposure in this industry to less than 300 mpcf.y has been essentially innocuous, although there was a small risk or pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma. Higher exposures have, however, led to excesses, increasing with degree of exposure, of mortality from all causes, and from lung cancer and stomach cancer, but such exposures, of at least 300 mpcf.y, are several orders of magnitude more severe than any that have been seen for many years. The effects of cigarette smoking were much more deleterious than those of dust exposure, not only for lung cancer (the SMR for smokers of 20+ cigarettes a day being 4.6 times higher than that for non-smokers), but also for stomach cancer (2.0 times higher), laryngeal cancer (2.9 times higher), and-most importantly-for all causes (1.6 times higher).
Notes
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):3-129072948
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Jun;45(4):329-35; author reply 336-811414250
PubMed ID
9072947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute effects of ambient inhalable particles in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205834
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Apr;157(4 Pt 1):1034-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
S. Vedal
J. Petkau
R. White
J. Blair
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Apr;157(4 Pt 1):1034-43
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - physiopathology
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - physiopathology
Male
Meteorological Concepts
Particle Size
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Respiratory Mechanics
Vital Capacity
Wood
Abstract
Although increases in inhalable particle (PM10) concentrations have been associated with acute reductions in the level of lung function and increased symptom reporting in children, including children with asthma, it is not clear whether these effects occur largely in asthmatic children, or even whether asthmatic children are more likely to experience these effects than children without asthma. To address these points, the following subgroups of children were selected from a survey population of all 2,200 elementary school children (6 to 13 yr of age) in a pulp mill community on the west coast of Vancouver Island: (1) all children with physician-diagnosed asthma (n = 75 participated), (2) all children with an exercise-induced fall in FEV1 without diagnosed asthma (n = 57), (3) all children with airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC
PubMed ID
9563716 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute effects on forced expiratory volume in one second and longitudinal change in pulmonary function among wood trimmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218525
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Apr;25(4):551-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M. Dahlqvist
U. Ulfvarson
Author Affiliation
Department of Work Science, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Apr;25(4):551-8
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Diseases, Fungal - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pneumoconiosis - physiopathology
Risk factors
Sweden
Vital Capacity - physiology
Wood
Abstract
Wood trimmers are exposed to molds that periodically grow on timber, and may develop acute as well as chronic pulmonary function impairment. This study examined whether these acute changes in pulmonary function are predictors for a longitudinal deterioration in pulmonary function, beyond normal aging and exposure. Across-shift changes in pulmonary function, measured during a working week, were evaluated in 15 wood trimmers with a follow-up time of 27 months. Twenty-six sawmill workers, employed at the same plants as the wood trimmers, served as control subjects. The highest concentration of viable mold spores for the wood trimmers was 10(6) colony-forming units (cfu)/m3, i.e., several times higher than the corresponding value for the sawmill workers. At the follow-up, wood trimmers had a lower forced vital capacity (FVC) on average, after adjustment for age and height, compared to the sawmill workers. In addition, a correlation was found between the across-week change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the decline in FEV1 between the first and the second occasion, after adjusting for normal aging in nonsmoking wood trimmers (r2 = 84%, p
PubMed ID
8010297 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute health effects common during graffiti removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50823
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S. Langworth
H. Anundi
L. Friis
G. Johanson
M L Lind
E. Söderman
B A Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. sven.langworth@pharmacia.com
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Collection - methods
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Irritants - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify possible health effects caused by different cleaning agents used in graffiti removal. METHODS: In 38 graffiti removers working 8-h shifts in the Stockholm underground system, the exposure to organic solvents was assessed by active air sampling, biological monitoring, and by interviews and a questionnaire. Health effects were registered, by physical examinations, porta7ble spirometers and self-administered questionnaires. The prevalence of symptoms was compared with 49 controls working at the underground depots, and with 177 population controls. RESULTS: The 8-h time-weighted average exposures (TWA) were low, below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents. The short-term exposures occasionally exceeded the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL), especially during work in poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators. The graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of tiredness and upper airway symptoms compared with the depot controls, and significantly more tiredness, headaches and symptoms affecting airways, eyes and skin than the population controls. Among the graffiti removers, some of the symptoms increased during the working day. On a group basis, the lung function registrations showed normal values. However, seven workers displayed a clear reduction of peak expiratory flow (PEF) over the working shift. CONCLUSIONS: Though their average exposure to organic solvents was low, the graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of unspecific symptoms such as fatigue and headache as well as irritative symptoms from the eyes and respiratory tract, compared with the controls. To prevent adverse health effects it is important to inform the workers about the health risks, and to restrict use of the most hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, it is important to develop good working practices and to encourage the use of personal protective equipment.
PubMed ID
11355296 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myeloid leukemia among petrol station attendants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23990
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1993 Jul-Aug;48(4):255-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Jakobsson
A. Ahlbom
T. Bellander
I. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Health, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1993 Jul-Aug;48(4):255-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Benzene - adverse effects - analysis
Confidence Intervals
Environmental monitoring
Gasoline - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) within different occupations was studied, using occupational information obtained from the Swedish 1970 census. Follow-up in the Swedish Cancer Register was carried out from 1971 to 1984. Among male petrol station attendants, 10 cases were observed versus 2.8 expected (observed/expected = 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.7-6.6). For several decades, Swedish petrol has contained 3-5% of benzene. Thus, a hypothesis was that benzene had contributed to the excess risk. The work histories of the 10 cases were reconstructed through interviews with surviving relatives and were compatible with the hypothesis. However, because the air benzene exposures at petrol stations always have been lower than benzene exposures associated previously with an increased risk of AML, the leukemogenic effect of benzene may have been potentiated by other petrol or vehicle exhaust components.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Environ Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;51(6):469-719012330
PubMed ID
8357276 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects living near a coal-fired plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240980
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Pershagen
Z. Hrubec
U. Lorich
P. Rönnqvist
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1984 Jan-Feb;39(1):27-33
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Coal - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - analysis
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - epidemiology
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Daily symptom rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects with presumed high sensitivity to air pollution who lived near a coal-fired plant were compared with 24-hr ambient air concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, soot, and suspended particles as well as with emissions from the plant. The mean concentrations of each of the pollutants during the 4-month study period were below 30 micrograms/m3, and no single 24-hr concentration exceeded 100 micrograms/m3. There were no consistent associations between plant emissions and pollutant levels or between these two variables and daily symptom rates. The results indicate that the coal-fired plant was not of major importance for the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms in the surrounding population.
PubMed ID
6712282 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adult-onset asthma and occupational exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15626
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Oct;25(5):430-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
K. Torén
B. Järvholm
J. Brisman
S. Hagberg
B A Hermansson
L. Lillienberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. Kjell.Toren@ymk.gu.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1999 Oct;25(5):430-5
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - classification
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examined certain occupational exposures and the risk for adult-onset asthma. METHODS: A nested case-referent study of adult-onset asthma was performed on a random population sample (N=15813), aged 21 to 51 years. Cases for the study included 2 groups: subjects reporting "physician-diagnosed" asthma (N=251) and a broader "asthma" group (N=362). The "asthma" group consisted of subjects with "physician-diagnosed" asthma (N=251) and subjects reporting asthma-like symptoms without having "physician-diagnosed" asthma (N=111). The referents (N=2044) were randomly selected from the whole population sample. The case-referent sample was investigated with a comprehensive questionnaire about occupational exposures, asthma, respiratory symptoms, smoking, and atopy. Odds ratios were calculated with stratification for gender, year of diagnosis, and birth year. RESULTS: The highest odds ratio for "physician-diagnosed" asthma was associated with exposure to flour dust [odds ratio (OR) 2.8, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-5.2] and the occupational handling of resin-based paints (isocyanates) (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.6-5.9). Exposure to welding fumes, textile dust, and work with glues containing acrylates was also associated with an increased odds ratio for "physician-diagnosed" asthma. Including persons with asthma-like symptoms (ie, the asthma group) showed similar results. CONCLUSION: This population-based case-referent study from Sweden indicates that occupational exposure to acrylate-based compounds and welding fumes is associated with increased risk for adult-onset asthma.
PubMed ID
10569463 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Aerogenic risk factors and diagnosis of bauxite pneumoconiosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112905
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
A O Peshkova
N A Roslaia
O F Roslyi
E I Likhacheva
A A Fedoruk
T V Slyshkina
E R Vagina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):15-8
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Aluminum Oxide - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - manpower - standards
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pneumoconiosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The research purpose is an estimation of influence of the bauxite dust on the state of the bronchopulmonary system of workers. It has been indicated that exposure of the poor fibrogenic dust while the process of the bauxite ore extraction, results in development of pnevmokoniosis characterized by substantial ventilatory and haemodynamic disorders limiting the workability of patients.
PubMed ID
23785803 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne occupational exposure, ABO phenotype and risk of ischaemic heart disease in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53657
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, H:S Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, Denmark. ps11@bbh.ohsp.dk
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):191-8
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phenotype
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that long-term occupational exposure to airborne pollutants is a stronger risk factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in men with blood type O than in men with other ABO phenotypes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and prospective study taking into account potential confounders. SETTING: The Copenhagen Male Study. SUBJECTS: 3321 men aged 53-74 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Lifetime prevalence of myocardial infarction and incidence of IHD in an 8-year follow-up among men without overt cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Among men with phenotypes other than O no association was found between airborne pollutant exposure and IHD risk. Among men with blood type O (P = 1417, 42%), 4.7% had a history of myocardial infarction, as compared with 5.7% among men with other phenotypes (P = 1904, 58%). Long-term occupational exposure (> 5 years of exposure) to various airborne pollutants: soldering fumes, welding fumes and plastic fumes was associated with a significantly increased lifetime prevalence of myocardial infarction. Odds ratios (95% confidence limits) for these factors were 3.0 (1.6-5.8), P = 0.002, 2.1 (1.05-4.2), P = 0.05, and 8.3 (2.6-27.0), P = 0.003. In an 8-year follow-up a similar though weaker association was found with a significantly increased risk for those exposed long term to soldering fumes: 1.8 (1.0-3.2), P = 0.05. CONCLUSION: The finding of a quite strong interplay between airborne pollutants, ABO phenotypes, and risk of IHD, may open up new possibilities for clarifying the roles of the ABO blood group and air pollution as cardiovascular risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):179-8212394325
PubMed ID
12394327 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air contaminants in different European farming environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189560
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(1):41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Katja Radon
Brigitta Danuser
Martin Iversen
Eduard Monso
Christoph Weber
Jörg Hartung
Kelley Donham
Urban Palmgren
Dennis Nowak
Author Affiliation
Institute for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Ziemssenstr. 1, D-80336 Munich, Germany. katja.radon@arbeits.med.uni-muenchen.de
Source
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2002;9(1):41-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects
Endotoxins - adverse effects
Germany
Housing, Animal
Humans
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Poultry
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Spain
Swine
Switzerland
Abstract
Farmers are known to be at high risk from the development of occupational airway disease. The first stage of the European farmers' study has shown that pig farmers in Denmark and Germany, poultry farmers in Switzerland and greenhouse workers in Spain were at highest risk for work-related respiratory symptoms. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine exposure levels at relevant farm workplaces. Dust and endotoxin levels as well as microbiological concentrations were determined in 213 crop and animal farming environments by personal sampling. The highest total dust concentrations were found in poultry houses in Switzerland with median concentrations of 7.01 mg/m(3). The median airborne endotoxin concentrations in total dust ranged between 0.36 ng/m(3) in Spanish greenhouses and 257.58 ng/m(3) in poultry houses in Switzerland. Likewise, the highest median concentrations of total (2.0 x (7) cells/m(3)) and active fungi (4.4 x (5) cfu/m(3)) have been found in Swiss poultry houses. The predominant fungus taxa discovered in poultry houses were Eurotium spp. and thermophilic fungi. Cladosporium and Botrytis were mainly detected in greenhouses. The exposure level found in this study might put the farmers at risk from respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
12088396 View in PubMed
Less detail

354 records – page 1 of 36.