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103 records – page 1 of 11.

[Abstract of the Environmental and Health Administration's Report from Frederica: relationship between air pollution and lung cancer not proven]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27458
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Feb 14;79(7):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-1979
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1979 Feb 14;79(7):17
Date
Feb-14-1979
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Denmark
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
PubMed ID
254454 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Airborne dust particles in indoor environment and allergy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15479
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Apr 30;121(11):1344-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-2001
Author
H. Ormstad
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for miljømedisin, Statens institutt for folkehelse, Postboks 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo. heidi.ormstad@folkehelsa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Apr 30;121(11):1344-50
Date
Apr-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
English Abstract
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - chemically induced - etiology - immunology
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission
Norway
Particle Size
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - etiology - immunology
Sulfur Compounds - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The overall aim of this study was to investigate how airborne house dust particles may contribute to an allergic immune response, and thereby also to asthma and allergic diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using transmission electron microscopy, we quantified and characterized airborne house dust particles, with regard to elemental and size distribution. Furthermore, an immunogold labelling technique was used to study whether some common allergens were present on the surface of airborne house dust particles. Finally, a mouse model was used to study the adjuvant activity of airborne house dust on the IgE antibody response. RESULTS: A vast majority of the airborne particles samples from homes in Oslo were found to be less than 2.5 microns in diameter, thus they are liable to penetrate deep into the respiratory tree. This PM2.5 fraction contained, in addition to sulphur aerosols and silicates, many soot particles, most of them being less than 1 micron in diameter. These soot particles were found to carry allergens on their surface. We also found that diesel exhaust particles, which is probably a main soot component of airborne house dust, absorbed several wellknown allergens in vitro. Furthermore, the airborne house dust particles were found to elicit a local lymph node response, and to have an adjuvant activity on the production of IgE antibodies to ovalbumin as a model allergen. INTERPRETATION: These results show that indoor suspended particulate matter contains a lot of potential allergen carriers, i.e. soot particles (carbon aggregates), most of them being less that 1 micron in diameter and thereby able to transport allergens deep into the airways. In addition, our results indicate that suspended particulate matter may have an adjuvant effect on the production of IgE to common environmental allergens, and also may provoke a local inflammatory response.
PubMed ID
11419103 View in PubMed
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Airborne mutagens and carcinogens from cooking and other food preparation processes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23631
Source
Toxicol Lett. 1994 Jun;72(1-3):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
G. Löfroth
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Unit, Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Toxicol Lett. 1994 Jun;72(1-3):83-6
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Amines - adverse effects - chemistry
Carcinogens - chemistry - toxicity
Cookery
Food
Heat
Heterocyclic Compounds - adverse effects - chemistry
Humans
Mutagens - adverse effects - chemistry
Abstract
The common food preparation processes, frying, broiling and baking, can give rise to air pollutants that are known to be mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal tests. A large number of persons can be exposed to such fumes as cooking is performed in most households and in many commercial enterprises. Additional studies on the emissions from these processes and exposure measurements are needed. Epidemiological studies on occupationally-exposed cooks and bakers with respect to cancer are equivocal.
PubMed ID
8202960 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Mar 17;159(12):1779
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-1997
Source
Postgrad Med. 1977 Jul;62(1):124-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1977
Author
E M Cordasco
H S VanOrdstrand
Source
Postgrad Med. 1977 Jul;62(1):124-7
Date
Jul-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Cadmium - adverse effects
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects
Chlorine - adverse effects
Chronic Disease
Humans
Lung - pathology
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - chemically induced
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
Air pollution referable to increased ambient levels of sulfur dioxide and suspended particulates is associated with increased episodes of acute bronchitis and is also causally related to some cases of chronic bronchitis. Oxidant air pollution is associated with abnormalities of pulmonary function in children and is a major contributory factor in COP, especially bronchitis, in some areas of the United States. The relationship of nitrogen dioxide atmospheric contamination to COPD is still controversial. In our opinion, the epidemiologic studies conducted to date have been inadequate and further elucidation is indicated. Cadmium fumes and compounds have been found to be instrumental in the development of some cases of chronic bronchitis and emphysema in Sweden. This association is unproved in the United States and warrants a thorough clinical and epidemiologic evaluation.
PubMed ID
876896 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jan 20;122(2):198-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2002
Author
Teresa Løvold Berents
Bjørgulf Claussen
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for arbeids- og trygdemedisin Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin Postboks 1130 Blindern 0317 Oslo. tvlovold@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Jan 20;122(2):198-201
Date
Jan-20-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental health
Health status
Humans
Morbidity
Mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 28;122(6):65111998725
PubMed ID
11873580 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution, asthma and allergy--the importance of different types of particles]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15327
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2002
Author
Heidi Ormstad
Martinus Løvik
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for miljøimmunologi, Divisjon for miljømedisin, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Postboks 4404 Nydalen 0403 Oslo. heidi.ormstad@folkehelsa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Date
Aug-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - etiology
Dust - adverse effects
English Abstract
Heating - adverse effects
Humans
Motor Vehicles
Particle Size
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - etiology
Rubber - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Particulate air pollution has been much discussed in Norway during the last few years. Coarse particles from asphalt are likely to have quite different properties than the far smaller particles from diesel exhaust. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the basis of data from the literature and our own research, we discuss the health problem of different types of particles with a focus on allergy and respiratory symptoms. RESULTS: Diesel exhaust particles have well-documented adverse effects in relation to allergic airway disease. They increase symptoms load in already allergic individuals and also seem to contribute to the increased prevalence of allergy. PM10 is today measured on the basis of weight, not on number. Diesel exhaust particles are much smaller than road surface particles; hence PM10 measurements reflect road surface dust pollution more than exhaust particles. INTERPRETATION: Focus should now be given to diesel exhaust particles in order to reduce the adverse health effects of particulate air pollution in Norwegian cities.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):176612362683
PubMed ID
12362688 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution, eczema and asthma in Sør-Varanger. Is the high consumption of corticosteroid ointments caused by increased tendency for eczema?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16024
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993
Author
H G Sunde
K A Holtedahl
Author Affiliation
Kommunehelsetjenesten i Sør-Varanger, Bjørnevatn.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):218-21
Date
Jan-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Drug Utilization
Eczema - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Ointments
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Many investigations suggest that a high degree of air-borne pollution increases the prevalence of diseases like asthma and eczema. Sør-Varanger Municipality in Finnmark County in the north of Norway receives much air-borne pollution from domestic industry and from the metallurgic industry on the Kola peninsula in North-Western Russia. We have investigated indirect parameters of morbidity caused by asthma and eczema by analyzing data on drug consumption and hospital admissions. In Sør-Varanger there is high consumption of corticosteroids for dermatological use. Consumption of anti-asthmatic drugs and number of admissions to hospital for asthma and eczema were no higher than expected. We suspect that air-borne pollution, particularly the heavy metal nickel, increases the prevalence and perhaps worsens the degree of eczema in Sør-Varanger.
PubMed ID
8430405 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution from the Soviet Union and mortality in Finnmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55411
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Jun 10;109(16):1759-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1989
Author
E. Lund
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Jun 10;109(16):1759-61
Date
Jun-10-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - chemically induced - mortality
Nickel - adverse effects
Norway
Risk factors
USSR
Abstract
The effect of airborne pollution, especially nickel, from Kola has been studied in 10,612 persons who participated in a cardiovascular screening survey in Finnmark in 1974-75. The age-range was 35-49 years and a follow-up for death was conducted up to 1985. Men living in the community of Sør-Varanger (close to the border) had a relative risk (RR) for death from diseases of 1.2 (95% confidence intervall; 0.9-1.6) compared with the rest of Finnmark, for women RR = 1.1. The increase in mortality for men was due to infactus cordis RR = 1.5 (1.0-2.4), and was not consistent for women (RR = 0.9). The study does not support the view that air pollution in this area has increased the risk of death.
PubMed ID
2749649 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air pollution from traffic at the residence of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19980
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
B L Thomsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
The hypothesis that exposure to traffic-related air pollution increases the risk of developing cancer during childhood was investigated. The authors enrolled 1,989 children reported to the Danish Cancer Registry with a diagnosis of leukemia, tumor of the central nervous system, or malignant lymphoma during 1968-1991 and 5,506 control children selected at random from the entire childhood population. The residential histories of the children were traced from 9 months before birth until the time of diagnosis of the cases and a similar period for the controls. For each of the 18,440 identified addresses, information on traffic and the configuration of streets and buildings was collected. Average concentrations of benzene and nitrogen dioxide (indicators of traffic-related air pollution) were calculated for the relevant period, and exposures to air pollution during pregnancy and during childhood were calculated separately. The risks of leukemia, central nervous system tumors, and all selected cancers combined were not linked to exposure to benzene or nitrogen dioxide during either period. The risk of lymphomas increased by 25% (p for trend = 0.06) and 51% (p for trend = 0.05) for a doubling of the concentration of benzene and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, during the pregnancy. The association was restricted to Hodgkin's disease.
PubMed ID
11226975 View in PubMed
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103 records – page 1 of 11.