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183 records – page 1 of 19.

25- to 30-nm virus particle associated with a hospital outbreak of acute gastroenteritis with evidence for airborne transmission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233035
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Jun;127(6):1261-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988
Author
L A Sawyer
J J Murphy
J E Kaplan
P F Pinsky
D. Chacon
S. Walmsley
L B Schonberger
A. Phillips
K. Forward
C. Goldman
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Jun;127(6):1261-71
Date
Jun-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Microbiology
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Disease Outbreaks
Emergency Service, Hospital
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Hospital Units
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norwalk virus - isolation & purification
Ontario
Virion - isolation & purification
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
Between November 1 and 22, 1985, an outbreak of acute, nonbacterial gastroenteritis occurred in a 600-bed hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Illness in 635 of 2,379 (27%) staff was characterized by fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting and had a median duration of 24-48 hours. The finding of virus-like particles measuring 25-30 nm in six stool specimens and low rates of seroresponse to Norwalk virus (3/39) and Snow Mountain agent (1/6) suggest that a Norwalk-like virus was responsible for the outbreak. The outbreak was of abrupt onset and high incidence, affecting 79 people in a single day. No common food or water exposure could be identified. The attack rate was greatest (69%) for staff who had worked in the Emergency Room. Of 100 patients and their companions who visited the Emergency Room on November 11-12 for unrelated problems, 33 (33%) developed gastroenteritis 24-48 hours after their visit, versus 0 of 18 who visited the Emergency Room on November 8 (p less than 0.001). An analysis of housekeepers who worked at least once during the period from November 9-13, which included those who became ill during the period of November 9-14, showed that the risk of becoming ill was four times greater for those who visited or walked through the Emergency Room than for those who did not (p = 0.028). These data are consistent with the possibility of the airborne spread of a virus.
PubMed ID
2835899 View in PubMed
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[About the microbiological criteria for air quality barracks in the far north].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131523
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2011 Jun;332(6):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
M V Gavrik
A S Gorin
V I Domashov
R A Suleimanov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2011 Jun;332(6):19-24
Date
Jun-2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air pollution, indoor
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Female
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Respiratory Tract Infections - microbiology - prevention & control
Russia
Abstract
A comparative study of air quality in terms of microbiological indicators in the barracks room personnel a number of units of the Northern Fleet is perfomed. The direct dependence of the degree of microbial contamination of air and the frequency of respimratory diseases from the specific volume of space per person is showed. Criteria for assessing air quality in terms of microbiological indicators and a set of measures to improve it are suggested.
PubMed ID
21899074 View in PubMed
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Aerobiology in the operating room--a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233569
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A. Hambraeus
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Bacteriology, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Bacteriological Techniques
Clothing
Humans
Operating Rooms - standards
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Sweden
Temperature
Ultraviolet Rays
Ventilation
PubMed ID
2896749 View in PubMed
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Airborne enteric micro-organisms and ammonia levels in diaper-changing rooms in kindergartens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126489
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 2012 May;54(5):462-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
P E Vaattovaara
M. Kivimäenpää
P. Vaattovaara
P. Pasanen
H. Heinonen-Tanski
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. piia.vaattovaara@uef.fi
Source
Lett Appl Microbiol. 2012 May;54(5):462-7
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Finland
Humans
Incontinence Pads
Infant
Infant care
Abstract
We evaluated risks associated with diaper changing in Finnish kindergartens where children were using either modern disposable paper or reusable cloth diapers.
We determined enteric micro-organisms and ammonia in diaper-changing rooms in four kindergartens in autumn and winter in the ambient air. No coliphages were detected in the air. The numbers of faecal coliforms and enterococci in air were typically low regardless of whether the children used either paper or cloth diapers. Ammonia concentrations increased over the background level because of diaper changing.
The numbers of bacteria or coliphages are not expected to pose any high air hygiene risks, and increased ammonia air concentrations are unlikely to impair the health of staff or children when diapers are changed in modern kindergartens. However, increased ammonia gas concentrations indicate that some other diaper-related gas-phase emissions should be studied to understand better diaper-related health risks.
Modern reusable cloth baby diapers and the modern paper baby diapers used in this study are equally safe with respect to risks from airborne virus, bacteria or ammonia.
PubMed ID
22385430 View in PubMed
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Airborne fungal and bacterial components in PM1 dust from biofuel plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149575
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Oct;53(7):749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Anne Mette Madsen
Vivi Schlünssen
Tina Olsen
Torben Sigsgaard
Hediye Avci
Author Affiliation
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. amm@nrcwe.dk
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2009 Oct;53(7):749-57
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacteria - isolation & purification
Aerosols
Air Microbiology
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Biofuels - microbiology
Denmark
Dust
Fungi - isolation & purification
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Particle Size
Seasons
Abstract
Fungi grown in pure cultures produce DNA- or RNA-containing particles smaller than spore size ( 3)-beta-D-glucans. In the 29 PM(1) samples, cultivable fungi were found in six samples and with a median concentration below detection level. Using microscopy, fungal spores were identified in 22 samples. The components NAGase and (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucans, which are mainly associated with fungi, were present in all PM(1) samples. Thermophilic actinomycetes were present in 23 of the 29 PM(1) samples [average = 739 colony-forming units (CFU) m(-3)]. Cultivable and 'total bacteria' were found in average concentrations of, respectively, 249 CFU m(-3) and 1.8 x 10(5) m(-3). DNA- and RNA-containing particles of different lengths were counted by microscopy and revealed a high concentration of particles with a length of 0.5-1.5 microm and only few particles >1.5 microm. The number of cultivable fungi and beta-glucan in the total dust correlated significantly with the number of DNA/RNA-containing particles with lengths of between 1.0 and 1.5 microm, with DNA/RNA-containing particles >1.5 microm, and with other fungal components in PM(1) dust. Airborne beta-glucan and NAGase were found in PM(1) samples where no cultivable fungi were present, and beta-glucan and NAGase were found in higher concentrations per fungal spore in PM(1) dust than in total dust. This indicates that fungal particles smaller than fungal spore size are present in the air at the plants. Furthermore, many bacteria, including actinomycetes, were present in PM(1) dust. Only 0.2% of the bacteria in PM(1) dust were cultivable.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19620231 View in PubMed
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Air-borne fungi and respiratory allergy: a Montreal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110432
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Nov 2;99(17):827-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-1968
Author
W P Warren
B. Rose
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1968 Nov 2;99(17):827-31
Date
Nov-2-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Allergens
Asthma - etiology
Bronchitis - etiology
Canada
Fungi
Humans
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - etiology - microbiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - etiology
Sinusitis - etiology
Skin Tests
Notes
Cites: J Allergy. 1953 Jul;24(4):348-5413061195
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1962 Dec 22;87:1310-314028235
Cites: J Pathol Bacteriol. 1964 Jul;88:141-5114194971
Cites: Ann Allergy. 1964 Nov;22:575-8714227993
PubMed ID
5685887 View in PubMed
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Airborne infectious diseases during infancy and mortality in later life in southern Sweden, 1766-1894.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30976
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;32(2):286-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Tommy Bengtsson
Martin Lindström
Author Affiliation
Department of Economic History, Lund University, 5220-07 Lund, Sweden. tommy.bengtsson@ekh.lu.se
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;32(2):286-94
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Microbiology
Communicable Diseases - mortality
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The importance of early life conditions and current conditions for mortality in later life was assessed using historical data from four rural parishes in southern Sweden. Both demographic and economic data are valid. METHODS: Longitudinal demographic and socioeconomic data for individuals and household socioeconomic data from parish registers were combined with local area data on food costs and disease load using a Cox regression framework to analyse the 55-80 year age group mortality (number of deaths = 1398). RESULTS: In a previous paper, the disease load experienced during the birth year, measured as the infant mortality rate, was strongly associated with old-age mortality, particularly the outcome of airborne infectious diseases. In the present paper, this impact persisted after controlling for variations in food prices during pregnancy and the birth year, and the disease load on mothers during pregnancy. The impact on mortality in later life stems from both the short-term cycles and the long-term decline in infant mortality. An asymmetrical effect and strong threshold effects were found for the cycles. Years with very high infant mortality, dominated by smallpox and whooping cough, had a strong impact, while modest changes had almost no impact at all. The effects of the disease load during the year of birth were particularly strong for children born during the winter and summer. Children severely exposed to airborne infectious diseases during their birth year had a much higher risk of dying of airborne infectious diseases in their old age. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that exposure to airborne infectious diseases during the first year of life increases mortality at ages 55-80.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;32(2):294-512714552
PubMed ID
12714551 View in PubMed
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Airborne microfungi from eastern Canadian sawmills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197620
Source
Can J Microbiol. 2000 Jul;46(7):612-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
C. Duchaine
A. Mériaux
Author Affiliation
Centre de Pneumologie, Hôpital and Université Laval, Sainte-Foy, Canada. duchaine@mediom.qc.ca
Source
Can J Microbiol. 2000 Jul;46(7):612-7
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Allergens
Canada
Dust
Forestry
Fungi - isolation & purification
Humans
Occupational Exposure
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Abstract
Working in sawmills is associated with bioaerosol exposure and respiratory health problems. This study is the first to analyze the mycoflora of eastern Canadian sawmills and the nature of airborne contamination at different work sites. Fifty work sites (debarking, sawing, planing, and sorting) within 17 sawmills were sampled for airborne microfungi. One thousand seven hundred strains were isolated, quantified to determine the frequency of occurrence, and then identified. Unlike the European studies, we did not frequently identify the presence of fungi that were described in European sawmills as being related to respiratory health problems. In eastern Canadian sawmills, Penicillium species are the most frequently isolated microfungi.
PubMed ID
10932354 View in PubMed
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Airborne molds and actinomycetes in the work environment of farmer's lung patients in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240676
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Apr;10(2):115-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1984
Author
M H Kotimaa
K H Husman
E O Terho
M H Mustonen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Apr;10(2):115-9
Date
Apr-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Aspergillus - isolation & purification
Environmental Exposure
Farmer's Lung - etiology - microbiology
Finland
Humans
Microbiological Techniques - instrumentation
Micromonosporaceae - isolation & purification
Specimen Handling - instrumentation
Spores, Fungal - isolation & purification
Temperature
Abstract
Occurrence of molds and actinomycetes in the breathing zone of farmers during the handling of hay, straw, or grain was studied with the use of an Andersen sampler on 35 farms in Finland. On 24 farms there was a person with recently diagnosed farmer's lung disease, and on 11 farms people were free of the disease. The total spore concentration and the concentrations of the spores of Thermoactinomyces (T) vulgaris, Micropolyspora (M) faeni, and Aspergillus (A) umbrosus were statistically significantly higher on the farms of patients with farmer's lung than on the disease-free farms. The mean proportions of the spores of thermotolerant and thermophilic microbes were greater on the farms of farmer's lung patients than on the reference farms. T vulgaris was the predominant actinomycete species. Both T vulgaris and A umbrosus were found on all farms of farmer's lung patients, but M faeni on only about half of such farms. The findings match the results of previous microbiological analyses of Finnish moldy hay and serological analyses of Finnish farmer's lung patients. It seems that T vulgaris, not M faeni, may be the main causative agent of farmer's lung in Finland. The possible etiologic role of A umbrosus requires further investigation. Because the farmers often failed to identify the moldiness of the plant material in contrast to researchers, it might be possible, through training, to improve farmers' ability to identify moldiness.
PubMed ID
6382592 View in PubMed
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Airborne molds and bacteria, microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC), plasticizers and formaldehyde in dwellings in three North European cities in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117626
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 1;444:433-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2013
Author
Bo Sahlberg
Maria Gunnbjörnsdottir
Argo Soon
Rain Jogi
Thorarinn Gislason
Gunilla Wieslander
Christer Janson
Dan Norback
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. bo.sahlberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 1;444:433-40
Date
Feb-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Cities
Estonia
Female
Formaldehyde - analysis - toxicity
Fungi
Furans - analysis - toxicity
Glycols - analysis
Humans
Iceland
Male
Methyl n-Butyl Ketone - analysis - toxicity
Octanols - analysis - toxicity
Plasticizers - toxicity
Sick Building Syndrome - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
There are few studies on associations between airborne microbial exposure, formaldehyde, plasticizers in dwellings and the symptoms compatible with the sick building syndrome (SBS). As a follow-up of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS II), indoor measurements were performed in homes in three North European cities. The aim was to examine whether volatile organic compounds of possible microbial origin (MVOCs), and airborne levels of bacteria, molds, formaldehyde, and two plasticizers in dwellings were associated with the prevalence of SBS, and to study associations between MVOCs and reports on dampness and mold. The study included homes from three centers included in ECRHS II. A total of 159 adults (57% females) participated (19% from Reykjavik, 40% from Uppsala, and 41% from Tartu). A random sample and additional homes with a history of dampness were included. Exposure measurements were performed in the 159 homes of the participants. MVOCs were analyzed by GCMS with selective ion monitoring (SIM). Symptoms were reported in a standardized questionnaire. Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. In total 30.8% reported any SBS (20% mucosal, 10% general, and 8% dermal symptoms) and 41% of the homes had a history of dampness and molds There were positive associations between any SBS and levels of 2-pentanol (P=0.002), 2-hexanone (P=0.0002), 2-pentylfuran (P=0.009), 1-octen-3-ol (P=0.002), formaldehyde (P=0.05), and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol monoisobutyrate (Texanol) (P=0.05). 1-octen-3-ol (P=0.009) and 3-methylfuran (P=0.002) were associated with mucosal symptoms. In dwellings with dampness and molds, the levels of total bacteria (P=0.02), total mold (P=0.04), viable mold (P=0.02), 3-methylfuran (P=0.008) and ethyl-isobutyrate (P=0.02) were higher. In conclusion, some MVOCs like 1-octen-3-ol, formaldehyde and the plasticizer Texanol, may be a risk factor for sick building syndrome. Moreover, concentrations of airborne molds, bacteria and some other MVOCs were slightly higher in homes with reported dampness and mold.
PubMed ID
23280302 View in PubMed
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183 records – page 1 of 19.