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1260 records – page 1 of 126.

The 12-year prognosis of hand dermatosis in 896 Finnish farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215520
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1995 Apr;32(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
P. Susitaival
M. Hannuksela
Author Affiliation
Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1995 Apr;32(4):233-7
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Agriculture
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Protective Clothing
Risk factors
Abstract
In all, 896 Finnish farmers (305 men and 587 women), representing 77% of those reporting hand or forearm dermatosis in a questionnaire survey in 1979, were asked again about their dermatosis and current work in 1991. More than 50% of the study population had left farming since 1979. In 1991, 26% of men and 21% of women had a current dermatosis on the hands or forearms, and altogether, 44% of men and 39% of women reported a hand dermatosis within the past 12 months. Significant determinants of persistent hand dermatosis, in a logistic regression model, were continuation of farm work, history of skin atopy, symptoms of metal allergy, and age under 45 years. Handling cattle, e.g., milking, was considered an exacerbating factor of the dermatosis by 37% of those who had milked sometimes in their lives. In this group, 75% of hand dermatoses in those who had finished milking work had healed. The results indicate that giving up or changing work improves the prognosis of hand dermatosis in farming.
PubMed ID
7600779 View in PubMed
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The 2000 tularemia outbreak: a case-control study of risk factors in disease-endemic and emergent areas, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188853
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Henrik Eliasson
Johan Lindbäck
J Pekka Nuorti
Malin Arneborn
Johan Giesecke
Anders Tegnell
Author Affiliation
Orebro University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bites and Stings - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Cat Diseases - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Culicidae - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Vectors
Female
Francisella tularensis
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology - transmission
Abstract
A widespread outbreak of tularemia in Sweden in 2000 was investigated in a case-control study in which 270 reported cases of tularemia were compared with 438 controls. The outbreak affected parts of Sweden where tularemia had hitherto been rare, and these "emergent" areas were compared with the disease-endemic areas. Multivariate regression analysis showed mosquito bites to be the main risk factor, with an odds ratio (OR) of 8.8. Other risk factors were owning a cat (OR 2.5) and farm work (OR 3.2). Farming was a risk factor only in the disease-endemic area. Swollen lymph nodes and wound infections were more common in the emergent area, while pneumonia was more common in the disease-endemic area. Mosquito bites appear to be important in transmission of tularemia. The association between cat ownership and disease merits further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12194773 View in PubMed
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The 2007 Royal Colloquium, Narsaq, Greenland: in summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95441
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:517-20
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Brändström Dan
Source
Ambio. 2008 Nov;Spec No 14:517-20
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Crops, Agricultural
Culture
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
PubMed ID
19205130 View in PubMed
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Accelerated lung function decline in swine confinement workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208355
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Senthilselvan
J A Dosman
S P Kirychuk
E M Barber
C S Rhodes
Y. Zhang
T S Hurst
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Agriculture
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cereals
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Saskatchewan
Smoking - physiopathology
Swine
Abstract
We conducted a longitudinal study to determine the annual rate decline in pulmonary function measurements in male swine confinement workers. For comparison, a grain farming group and a nonfarming rural-dwelling control group were also chosen for the longitudinal study. Two hundred seventeen swine confinement workers, 218 grain farmers, and 179 nonfarming control subjects had valid pulmonary function measurements at the baseline observation conducted in 1990 to 1991 and at the second observation conducted in 1994 to 1995. The swine confinement workers were younger (mean age=38.3+/-11.7 [SD] years) than the nonfarming control subjects (42.6+/-10.4 years) and the grain farmers (44.5+/-11.9 years). When stratified by age, nonfarming control subjects had the lowest mean annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC in all age categories. The swine confinement workers had the largest annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC, and this was most obvious in the middle age categories. After controlling for age, height, smoking, and baseline pulmonary function, swine confinement workers had excess annual decline of 26.1 mL in FEV1 (p=0.0005), 33.5 mL in FVC (p=0.0002), and 42.0 mL/s in forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF[25-75%]) (p=0.02) over nonfarming control subjects. Grain farmers had excess annual decline of 16.4 mL in FEV1 (p=0.03), 26.7 mL in FVC (p=0.002), and 11.2 mL/s in FEF(25-75%) (p=0.38) over control subjects. These findings suggest that workers engaged in the swine industry and grain farmers appear prone to accelerated yearly losses in lung function and may therefore be at risk for the future development of chronic airflow limitation.
PubMed ID
9187201 View in PubMed
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Acceleration of global vegetation greenup from combined effects of climate change and human land management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297897
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 11; 24(11):5484-5499
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2018
Author
Lanhui Wang
Feng Tian
Yuhang Wang
Zhendong Wu
Guy Schurgers
Rasmus Fensholt
Author Affiliation
Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2018 11; 24(11):5484-5499
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Agriculture
Climate change
Forestry
Humans
Plant Development
Remote Sensing Technology
Urbanization
Abstract
Global warming and human land management have greatly influenced vegetation growth through both changes in spring phenology and photosynthetic primary production. This will presumably impact the velocity of vegetation greenup (Vgreenup, the daily rate of changes in vegetation productivity during greenup period), yet little is currently known about the spatio-temporal patterns of Vgreenup of global vegetation. Here, we define Vgreenup as the ratio of the amplitude of greenup (Agreenup) to the duration of greenup (Dgreenup) and derive global Vgreenup from 34-year satellite leaf area index (LAI) observations to study spatio-temporal dynamics of Vgreenup at the global, hemispheric, and ecosystem scales. We find that 19.9% of the pixels analyzed (n = 1,175,453) experienced significant trends toward higher greenup rates by an average of 0.018 m2  m-2  day-1 for 1982-2015 as compared to 8.6% of pixels with significant negative trends (p 
PubMed ID
29963745 View in PubMed
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Accident involvement and attitudes towards hazards and countermeasures in a Swedish rural population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37664
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):139-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
B. Jansson
C G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):139-42
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Agriculture
Attitude to Health
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Research on the resistance to implementation of effective injury control measures is needed. An important task is to identity factors or circumstances that influence the possibilities of taking active safety measures, and also factors that may limit or hinder such efforts. The objective of this study was to describe the farmers' own attitudes towards farm accident hazards and their interest in participating in preventive measures. The study is part of a project to develop systems for injury surveillance and control in Swedish emergency care. A standardised questionnaire for telephone interviews was used. All patients who had consulted an emergency department during a one-year period for injuries caused by accidents on 2,454 farms in two Swedish rural municipalities were interviewed. The results demonstrated that adults, especially young adults with small children, seem to be most conscious of accident risks and best motivated for participation in active safety measures, e.g. safety education.
PubMed ID
2367824 View in PubMed
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[Accidents affecting potato harvesters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220265
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Sep 27;155(39):3131-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-27-1993
Author
J U Hansen
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Odense Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Sep 27;155(39):3131-2
Date
Sep-27-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Arm Injuries - etiology - prevention & control - surgery
Denmark
Hand Injuries - etiology - prevention & control - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
During industrialization in agriculture, many farming machines have been introduced. It is well-known that farming is a dangerous workplace and that farm machinery cause many serious accidents every year. Four cases of accidents with potato harvesters are discussed. In three of four cases the farmers were injured while cleaning the machine without stopping it, which probably was the main cause of the accidents. Farmers are in general not careful enough when using farm machinery. Every year, farmers in Denmark are severely invalided in accidents with potato harvesters. A strategy to lower the accidents is proposed: 1. Information of farmers, farmer schools, machine constructors and importers about mechanisms of injury. 2. A better education of farmers in using potato harvesters (and other farming machines). 3. Better fencing of the potato harvesters. 4. If possibly constructional changes in the potato harvesters so things will not get stuck, or so that the machine will stop if things stuck. 5. Installation of switches on potato harvesters, which can be reached from all positions, stopping the machines immediately, or a remote switch control carried by the farmer.
PubMed ID
8212405 View in PubMed
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1260 records – page 1 of 126.