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613 records – page 1 of 62.

Source
Can Nurse. 1983 May;79(5):34-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983
Author
E. Podnieks
Source
Can Nurse. 1983 May;79(5):34-5
Date
May-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Humans
Patient Advocacy
Violence
PubMed ID
6551188 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71494
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Ehrenberg
M. Ehnfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. aeh@du.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):303-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Education, Nursing, Continuing - standards
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Inservice Training - standards
Male
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Homes
Nursing Process - standards
Nursing Records - standards
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy of patient records in Swedish nursing homes: congruence of record content and nurses' and patients' descriptions. Data from patient records will increasingly be used for care planning, quality assessment, research, health planning and allocation of resources. Knowledge about the accuracy of such secondary data, however, is limited and only a few studies have been conducted on the accuracy of nursing recording. The aim of this study was to analyse the concordance between the nursing documentation in nursing homes and descriptions of some specific problems of nurses and patients. Comparisons were made between wards where nurses had received training in structured recording based on the nursing process (study group) and wards where no intervention had taken place (reference group). Data were collected from the patient records of randomly selected nursing home residents (n=85). The methods used were audits of patient records and structured interviews with residents and nurses. The study revealed considerable deficiencies in the accuracy of the patient records when the records were compared with the reports from nurses and residents. The overall agreement between the interview data from nurses and from the patient records was low. Concordance was better in the study group as compared with the reference group in which the recorded data were structured only following chronological order. The study unequivocally demonstrates that there are major limitations in using records as a data source for the evaluation, planning and development of care.
PubMed ID
12453171 View in PubMed
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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
Less detail

Act with respect: Views of supportive actions for older workers after completion of comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302114
Source
Work. 2019; 62(4):585-598
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Stina Wallin
Anncristine Fjellman-Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education and Welfare Studies, Health Sciences, Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
Source
Work. 2019; 62(4):585-598
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Finland
Focus Groups - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation, Vocational - methods - standards
Respect
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace - psychology - standards
Abstract
The number of older workers will expand during the next decades. Older workers have more long-term health problems and related limitations.
This study examined supportive actions provided in occupational healthcare services to older workers after vocational rehabilitation. An additional purpose was to explore occupational healthcare professionals' views on how to realize and improve adequate support activities.
Qualitative and quantitative methods were used, including a postal questionnaire and focus group discussions. Sixty-seven occupational healthcare service units participated in the postal questionnaire. Eight occupational healthcare professionals participated in two focus group discussions. The qualitative data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis.
The qualitative analysis resulted in one theme (Act with respect), and four categories (Need for cooperation, Collaborative resources of involved stakeholders, Individual needs for support, and Gender as homogenous and separate groups). Quantitative results revealed that the workers' initiative strongly influenced the support carried out. Recommendations from the rehabilitation clinic were almost always considered when deciding on supportive actions. Focus group discussions brought up gender differences especially highlighted in the category Gender as homogenous and separate groups.
Appropriate support of older workers requires cooperation between involved stakeholders, including occupational healthcare services. Provided support should be based on individual needs, but a mutual practice of determining needed support is requested.
PubMed ID
31104047 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent psychosocial maturity and alcohol use: quantitative and qualitative analysis of longitudinal data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9984
Source
Adolescence. 2002;37(145):19-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Sigrun Adalbjarnardottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. sa@hi.is
Source
Adolescence. 2002;37(145):19-53
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Parents - psychology
Peer Group
Predictive value of tests
Psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Social Behavior
Social Class
Time Factors
Abstract
Based on a psyschosocial developmental framework, this study used a mixed model design, including both quantitative and qualitative methods, to examine the relationship between adolescents' psychosocial maturity and their alcohol use. A sample of 1,198 10th-grade students (51% female) was surveyed and followed up two years later. Both concurrent and longitudinal findings indicated that the more psychosocially mature adolescents were less likely to drink heavily than those who showed less maturity. At age 15 this relationship was even stronger for those whose peers also drank. Further, at age 17, this linear relationship was more pronounced for those who drank less heavily at age 15. Of the three psychosocial competencies examined, the construct of personal meaning was more strongly related to adolescent alcohol use than were the constructs of interpersonal understanding and interpersonal skills. To illustrate this construct, two of the adolescents were interviewed, a girl and a boy, individually at the end of both school years. Thematic and developmental analyses of the interviews revealed individual variations in how the adolescents made meaning of their drinking; these encourage speculations that go beyond the general pattern found in the study.
PubMed ID
12003290 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age- and health-related quality of life after total hip replacement: decreasing gains in patients above 70 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256755
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Jun;85(3):244-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Max Gordon
Meridith Greene
Paolo Frumento
Ola Rolfson
Göran Garellick
André Stark
Author Affiliation
The Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register , Gothenburg.
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Jun;85(3):244-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Osteoarthritis, Hip - surgery
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
While age is a common confounder, its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after total hip replacement is uncertain. This could be due to improper statistical modeling of age in previous studies, such as treating age as a linear variable or by using age categories. We hypothesized that there is a non-linear association between age and HRQoL.
We selected a nationwide cohort from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register of patients operated with total hip replacements due to primary osteoarthritis between 2008 and 2010. For estimating HRQoL, we used the generic health outcome questionnaire EQ-5D of the EuroQol group that consits or 2 parts: the EQ-5D index and the EQ VAS estimates. Using linear regression, we modeled the EQ-5D index and the EQ VAS against age 1 year after surgery. Instead of using a straight line for age, we applied a method called restricted cubic splines that allows the line to bend in a controlled manner. Confounding was controlled by adjusting for preoperative HRQoL, sex, previous contralateral hip surgery, pain, and Charnley classification.
Complete data on 27,245 patients were available for analysis. Both the EQ-5D index and EQ VAS showed a non-linear relationship with age. They were fairly unaffected by age until the patients were in their late sixties, after which age had a negative effect.
There is a non-linear relationship between age and HRQoL, with improvement decreasing in the elderly.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24786908 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-associated memory impairment--pathological memory decline or normal aging?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205448
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1998 Mar;39(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
H. Nielsen
A. Lolk
P. Kragh-Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1998 Mar;39(1):33-7
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Memory Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Reproducibility of Results
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine whether the memory capacity of individuals with age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) over a period of approximately 3 1/2 years declines more, if at all, than the memory capacity of persons without AAMI. Four computerized and three non-computerized memory tests, a naming test, and a test of visuo-motor speed were administered twice. Two estimates of intellectual capacity were made, one at the first examination and the other 3 1/2 years later. One person in the AAMI group (n = 44) developed vascular dementia. The group of AAMI subjects did less well on two of the seven memory tests after 3 1/2 years than they did initially; the control group (n = 18) had lower scores on one memory test at follow-up than they had previously. The data suggest that the memory capacity of subjects with AAMI is not pathologically impaired. The general intellectual level significantly influences whether an individual with memory complaints will be classified AAMI or not. People with high intelligence are less likely than people with lower intellectual capacity to fulfill the AAMI criteria. This suggests that AAMI lacks in construct validity.
PubMed ID
9619130 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age changes in processing speed as a leading indicator of cognitive aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84576
Source
Psychol Aging. 2007 Sep;22(3):558-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Finkel Deborah
Reynolds Chandra A
McArdle John J
Pedersen Nancy L
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Indiana University Southeast, 5201 Grant Line Road, New Albany, IN 47150, USA. dfinkel@ius.edu
Source
Psychol Aging. 2007 Sep;22(3):558-68
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Aptitude
Cognition
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Intelligence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Neuropsychological Tests
Reaction Time
Social Environment
Sweden
Twins - psychology
Abstract
Bivariate dual change score models were applied to longitudinal data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging to compare the dynamic predictions of 2-component theories of intelligence and the processing speed theory of cognitive aging. Data from up to 5 measurement occasions covering a 16-year period were available from 806 participants ranging in age from 50 to 88 years at the first measurement wave. Factors were generated to tap 4 general cognitive domains: verbal ability, spatial ability, memory, and processing speed. Model fitting indicated no dynamic relationship between verbal and spatial factors, providing no support for the hypothesis that age changes in fluid abilities drive age changes in crystallized abilities. The results suggest that, as predicted by the processing speed theory of cognitive aging, processing speed is a leading indicator of age changes in memory and spatial ability, but not verbal ability.
PubMed ID
17874954 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age-dependent occupational stress in doctors of various specialties].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128351
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(4):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Iu A Parfenov
V G Belov
V S Tsoi
A A Pakhomov
G A Ryzhak
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(4):729-35
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aging - psychology
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Russia
Abstract
A comparative assessment of the extent and structure of the various forms of professional burnout among doctors-organizers as well as therapeutists and surgeons depending on age was given. It is shown that the professional burnout in doctors-organizers conjugates with a high level of emotional tension manifested in avoidance of over-saturated emotional and professional communication outside professional activities, increased irritability and temper, reluctance to exercise empathy towards colleagues and compassion for patients. The comparison of three age groups of physicians to each other in terms of the level and features of the burnout was adduced; the results demonstrate the significant differences between the age periods of 30 and 40 years and over 41 years old. Physicians in the age group of 30-40 years old are inclined to depersonalization at a relatively low level of reduction of professional achievement. It was found that age specificity of formation of the syndrome of professional burnout among surgeons was caused by the increased tendency to development of professional burnout syndrome of young and middle-aged surgeons at low levels of professional burnout among older people.
PubMed ID
23734522 View in PubMed
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613 records – page 1 of 62.