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Abdominal symptoms, visits to the doctor, and medicine consumption among the elderly. A population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73151
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Sep;41(4):466-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. Kay
Author Affiliation
Medical Department C, Glostrup County Hospital.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Sep;41(4):466-9
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Therapy - utilization
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Humans
Male
Office Visits - utilization
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Abdominal symptoms are frequent in the normal elderly population, but only a minority contact doctors. The present study was performed to assess the impact of abdominal symptoms on primary health care and medicine consumption and, in addition, to describe factors that relate to resource consumption. A postal questionnaire was mailed to a random cohort of 859 Danish people at the age of 75. Seventy-nine percent returned the questionnaire. A total of 31% of the men and 42% of the women had experienced at least one abdominal symptom within the past year. Among these 25% had visited a doctor and a little less had taken medicine. The total expenses used on primary health care and medicine were 22,000 U.S. Dollars per 1000 persons. Factors related to visiting a doctor were not only the presence of symptoms but also the subject's concept of the symptom as a health problem. As a consequence, efforts to control expenses should also focus on why some subjects consider their symptoms a health-problem while others do not.
PubMed ID
7813253 View in PubMed
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Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
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Age differences in goals: implications for health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150663
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 May;13(3):336-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Xin Zhang
Helene Fung
Bob Ho-hong Ching
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 May;13(3):336-48
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada
Choice Behavior
Female
Goals
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Intention
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Pamphlets
Persuasive Communication
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Socioemotional selectivity theory postulates that, as people age, they prioritize emotionally meaningful goals. This study investigated whether these age differences in goals are reflected in how younger (aged 18-36, n = 111) and older adults (aged 62-86, n = 104) evaluated, remembered information from and were persuaded by health messages.
Participants were randomly assigned to read health pamphlets with identical factual information but emphasizing emotional or non-emotional goals.
Findings showed that health messages that emphasized emotional goals, but not those that emphasized future-oriented or neutral goals, were better remembered, were evaluated more positively and led to greater behavioral changes among older adults, but not younger adults.
These findings suggest that health messages targeting older adults may be more effective if they are framed in ways that emphasize love and caring.
PubMed ID
19484597 View in PubMed
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Age disparities in stroke quality of care and delivery of health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149008
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Gustavo Saposnik
Sandra E Black
Antoine Hakim
Jiming Fang
Jack V Tu
Moira K Kapral
Author Affiliation
Stroke Research Unit, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. saposnikg@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Deglutition Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - economics
Hospital Units - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - economics
Patient Discharge - economics
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - mortality - therapy
Thrombolytic Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Limited information is available on the effect of age on stroke management and care delivery. Our aim was to determine whether access to stroke care, delivery of health services, and clinical outcomes after stroke are affected by age.
This was a prospective cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, admitted to stroke centers participating in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network between July 1, 2003 and March 31, 2005. Primary outcomes were the following selected indicators of quality stroke care: (1) use of thrombolysis; (2) dysphagia screening; (3) admission to a stroke unit; (4) carotid imaging; (5) antithrombotic therapy; and (6) warfarin for atrial fibrillation at discharge. Secondary outcomes were risk-adjusted stroke fatality, discharge disposition, pneumonia, and length of hospital stay.
Among 3631 patients with ischemic stroke, 1219 (33.6%) were older than 80 years. There were no significant differences in stroke care delivery by age group. Stroke fatality increased with age, with a 30-day risk adjusted fatality of 7.1%, 6.5%, 8.8%, and 14.8% for those aged 59 or younger, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and 80 years or older, respectively. Those aged older than 80 years had a longer length of hospitalization, increased risk of pneumonia, and higher disability at discharge compared to those younger than 80. This group was also less likely to be discharged home.
In the context of a province-wide coordinated stroke care system, stroke care delivery was similar across all age groups with the exception of slightly lower rates of investigations in the very elderly. Increasing age was associated with stroke severity and stroke case-fatality.
PubMed ID
19696418 View in PubMed
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Age perceptions and physical activity among middle-aged men in three occupational groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82886
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jun;62(12):3024-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Wandel Margareta
Roos Gun
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. margareta.wandel@medisin.uio.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jun;62(12):3024-34
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Construction Materials
Engineering - manpower
Exercise
Finland
Health Behavior
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Norway
Occupations - classification
Social Class
Sweden
Transportation - manpower
Abstract
The aim of this study is to explore how middle-aged men in different socio-economic groups and with different work experiences, talk about ageing, and how they see age as a reason for pursuing or not pursuing physical activity. Data were collected in Oslo by interviews with 46 men (carpenters, engineers, drivers) aged 35-57 years, and workplace group discussions. The analysis explored similarities and differences in the men's interpretive repertoires on work, everyday activities, health and health-related habits. The data were discussed in relation to Bourdieu's theories on the production and conversion of physical capital. For the carpenters emerging themes related to the ageing body were worry about decline in strength, the feeling of uselessness, and an awareness of what the body can take. For the engineers, the themes were keeping the body in shape and the ability to tackle stress. In addition to these themes, the drivers focussed on leaving the body as it is/taking age as it comes. Men in all three occupational groups said that they were thinking more about health and disease with age. Even though many talked about becoming more sedate, there were also some who maintained physical activity or became more physically active with age. The emphasis and the reasons for being more physically active were different in the three groups, and involved aspects such as health, strength, pleasure, social milieu, and warding off personal problems. Age was therefore used as a reason both for being and not being physically active. In conclusion health workers should be aware of the different life experiences and views related to the body, health and physical activity that exist among men of different occupational groups. This is needed to tailor information to fit the interest areas of men belonging to different socio-economic groups.
PubMed ID
16426718 View in PubMed
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[Age-related changes in operators' activities and brain bioelectrical activity in the Navy specialists].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177467
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2004 Sep;325(9):46-51, 80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
O A Viatleva
V G Barchukov
Iu A Salenko
S V Krylov
O N Gracheva
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2004 Sep;325(9):46-51, 80
Date
Sep-2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Attention - physiology
Brain - physiology
Electroencephalography
Humans
Male
Memory - physiology
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Naval Medicine
Russia
Abstract
Psycho- and neurophysiologic investigation of 66 Navy specialists aged 18-71 has revealed the consecutive age-related worsening of different components of operators' activities with predominant and more early disorders in the processes of sensomotor coordination and attention. Apparently the age-related changes in functional state of certain cerebral areas underlie the observed disorders in operators' activities. It is supported by the results of correlation analysis between neurophysiologic and psychophysiologic indices.
PubMed ID
15537103 View in PubMed
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Age-related normative values for handgrip strength and grip strength's usefulness as a predictor of mortality and both cognitive and physical decline in older adults in northwest Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285527
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2017 Mar 01;17(1):417-432
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-01-2017
Author
A. Turusheva
E. Frolova
J-M Degryse
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2017 Mar 01;17(1):417-432
Date
Mar-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Physical Endurance - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper sought to provide normative values for grip strength among older adults across different age groups in northwest Russia and to investigate their predictive value for adverse events.
A population-based prospective cohort study of 611 community-dwelling individuals 65+. Grip strength was measured using the standard protocol applied in the Groningen Elderly Tests. The cut-off thresholds for grip strength were defined separately for men and women of different ages using a weighted polynomial regression. A Cox regression analysis, the c-statistic, a risk reclassification analysis, and bootstrapping techniques were used to analyze the data. The outcomes were the 5-year mortality rate, the loss of autonomy and mental decline.
We determined the age-related reference intervals of grip strength for older adults. The 5(th) and 10(th) percentiles of grip strength were associated with a higher risk for malnutrition, low autonomy, physical and mental functioning and 5-year mortality. The 5(th) percentile of grip strength was associated with a decline in autonomy.
This study presents age- and sex-specific reference values for grip strength in the 65+ Russian population derived from a prospective cohort study. The norms can be used in clinical practice to identify patients at increased risk for adverse outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28250246 View in PubMed
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[Aging, dementia and automobile driving].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206969
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3688-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1997
Author
A. Braekhus
Author Affiliation
Geriatrisk avdeling, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3688-9
Date
Oct-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Automobile Driver Examination - legislation & jurisprudence
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Dementia - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Norway
Abstract
According to Norwegian law, drivers 70 years and older must carry a health certificate. This is issued by a general practitioner. If the patient is not supposed to drive because of a medical condition, the doctor should report this to the County Health Officer. This can be problematic, not only because assessing whether a patient fulfills the criteria for driving is difficult, but also because the doctor has obligations to both the public and his patient. These problems are discussed, based on assessment of available literature and on personal experience. Dementia is common in old age and affects approximately 15% of persons aged 75 and older. Patients with moderate and severe dementia should certainly not drive. However, some patients with mild dementia can nevertheless be safe drivers. The problem, however, is to identify the safe drivers among patients with mild dementia. The current regulations on dementia and driving are presented briefly.
PubMed ID
9417667 View in PubMed
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An analysis of psychosocial theories of ageing and their relevance to practical gerontological nursing in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167827
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Sep;20(3):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Barbro Wadensten
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden. barbro.wadensten@hig.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Sep;20(3):347-54
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence - standards
Geriatric Nursing - education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Human Development
Humans
Knowledge
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Theory
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Psychological Theory
Role
Social Behavior
Social Support
Social Values
Sweden
Abstract
Theories exist to challenge current practice, create new approaches to practice and remodel the structure of rules and principles. One question is whether nurses could find in psychosocial theories of ageing a theoretical foundation on which to base support of older people in their ageing process.
The aim of the present paper was to analyse five psychosocial theories of ageing and to discover what they could mean for gerontological nursing in Sweden.
A literature search was conducted to find original works. Research questions inspired by Fawcett's framework guided the analysis.
Psychosocial theories of ageing cover different aspects of the ageing process, but do not address crucial issues regarding the attitudes and structure of good nursing care. These theories provide no clear guidance on how to care for older people and how to support them in their ageing process. However, the analysis did show that the theories contain underlying values that influence society and staff as regards their views on the ageing process and how care of older people should be carried out. Nursing interventions to support ageing will be quite different depending on the theoretical perspective taken by nurses.
There is a need to translate the ageing theories into guidelines, so that staff in gerontological care will have tools to use in practice irrespective of which theoretical perspective they choose to use in care. This could also promote care that is tailored to each individual older person.
PubMed ID
16922990 View in PubMed
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[Anxiety-depressive disorders in elderly migrants of the far north in the period of re-adaptation to new climatic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266126
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(4):672-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
R A Iaskevich
I I Khamnagadaev
E V Dereviannykh
L S Polikarpov
N G Gogolashvili
E V Taptygina
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(4):672-7
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aged
Aging - physiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Cold Climate
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Russia
Sex Factors
Test Anxiety Scale
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
The article presents the results of studies of the anxious and depressed characteristics in elderly migrants of the Far North with arterial hypertension in the period of their stay in new climatic conditions with regard to their North experience, gender, age and timing of rehabilitation. There was a high frequency of disturbing-depressive symptomatology of the surveyed migrants in the Far North, the frequency and severity of which increases with age; women migrants of Far North are prone to depression 1,8 times, anxiety--3,2 times more often than men. With the increase of the period of stay in the new climate and geographical conditions, the severity and frequency of occurrence of anxiety and depression increase. The obtained results should be taken into account when building rehabilitation program and forecasting its effectiveness, while conducting psychotherapy and psychological prevention in this group of patients.
PubMed ID
25946842 View in PubMed
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139 records – page 1 of 14.