Skip header and navigation

Refine By

859 records – page 1 of 86.

7-year stability of blood pressure in the Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197147
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
P T Katzmarzyk
T. Rankinen
L. Pérusse
R M Malina
C. Bouchard
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, North York, Ontario, Canada M3J IP3. katzmarz@yorku.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):403-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aging - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to examine the 7-year stability of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures in the Canadian population.
The sample included 1,503 participants 7-69 years of age from the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey who were remeasured in Campbell's Survey of 1988. Both SBP and DBP were adjusted for the effects of body mass index (BMI) using regression procedures.
Interage correlations from baseline to follow-up ranged from -0.17 to 0.61 for SBP and from -0.22 to 0. 51 for DBP. With few exceptions, correlations were positive and significant, and were highest and most consistent in adulthood. Further, between 27 and 39% of participants in the upper or lower quintiles in 1981 remained there in 1988. There were few differences in adiposity between those who remained in the upper or lower quintiles and those who did not. One exception was that males who remained in the upper quintile of SBP had greater values for BMI, sum of skinfolds, and waist circumference at baseline. Among adults, the best predictor of future blood pressure was baseline blood pressure, which accounted for between 12 and 34% of the variance in follow-up blood pressure, followed by age, follow-up BMI, and, in females, baseline physical activity levels.
Blood pressure demonstrated low to moderate stability over 7 years in Canada, and baseline level of adiposity was related to the stability of SBP in males.
PubMed ID
11006066 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2013 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115112
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Robert R Quinn
Pietro Ravani
Doreen M Rabi
Kaberi Dasgupta
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Lyne Cloutier
Martin Dawes
Simon W Rabkin
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Ross D Feldman
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Luc Poirier
Raj S Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Exercise - physiology
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2013. This year's update includes 2 new recommendations. First, among nonhypertensive or stage 1 hypertensive individuals, the use of resistance or weight training exercise does not adversely influence blood pressure (BP) (Grade D). Thus, such patients need not avoid this type of exercise for fear of increasing BP. Second, and separately, for very elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension (age 80 years or older), the target for systolic BP should be
PubMed ID
23541660 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal symptoms, visits to the doctor, and medicine consumption among the elderly. A population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73151
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Sep;41(4):466-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. Kay
Author Affiliation
Medical Department C, Glostrup County Hospital.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Sep;41(4):466-9
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Therapy - utilization
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Humans
Male
Office Visits - utilization
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Abdominal symptoms are frequent in the normal elderly population, but only a minority contact doctors. The present study was performed to assess the impact of abdominal symptoms on primary health care and medicine consumption and, in addition, to describe factors that relate to resource consumption. A postal questionnaire was mailed to a random cohort of 859 Danish people at the age of 75. Seventy-nine percent returned the questionnaire. A total of 31% of the men and 42% of the women had experienced at least one abdominal symptom within the past year. Among these 25% had visited a doctor and a little less had taken medicine. The total expenses used on primary health care and medicine were 22,000 U.S. Dollars per 1000 persons. Factors related to visiting a doctor were not only the presence of symptoms but also the subject's concept of the symptom as a health problem. As a consequence, efforts to control expenses should also focus on why some subjects consider their symptoms a health-problem while others do not.
PubMed ID
7813253 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ability to predict resting energy expenditure with six equations compared to indirect calorimetry in octogenarian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285968
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2017 Jun;92:52-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Mikael Karlsson
Erika Olsson
Wulf Becker
Brita Karlström
Tommy Cederholm
Per Sjögren
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2017 Jun;92:52-55
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Basal Metabolism
Body Composition
Body mass index
Body Weight
Calorimetry, Indirect
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Sweden
Abstract
The accuracy of predictive equations for calculating resting energy expenditure (REE) in elderly people has been questioned. Aging is associated with progressive declines in REE, which partly is explained by loss of fat free mass (FFM). Against this background we aimed to identify the most accurate predictive equation for REE in octogenarian men, taking body composition into account and using indirect calorimetry as reference value. REE was measured in 22 men (mean age 82.6±0.3years) and compared with six predictive equations: two based on FFM and four based on body weight, height and/or age. FFM was derived from Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analyses. Spearman's rank correlations showed a moderate to high positive monotonic correlation (r=0.62 to 0.79) between measured and calculated REE (all p
PubMed ID
28323025 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of acute tolerance to ethanol hypnosis in F-344 and BN/BIRIJ rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11625
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Jan-Feb;11(1):31-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J L York
A W Chan
Author Affiliation
Research Institute on Addictions, Buffalo, NY 14203.
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Jan-Feb;11(1):31-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Brain - metabolism
Drug Tolerance
Ethanol - administration & dosage - metabolism
Hypnosis
Male
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Reflex
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Male Fischer 344 (F-344) rats of three different ages (4, 13, and 25 months) and male Brown Norway (BN/BIRIJ) rats (4 months) were injected (IP) with a hypnotic dose of ethanol (3.0 g/kg, 10% w/v in saline). Half of the animals were decapitated and brains extracted immediately upon loss of the righting reflex (LRR), while the other half were allowed to reach recovery of the righting reflex (RRR), at which time brains were extracted. Brain alcohol analyses revealed significantly higher concentrations in young F-344 rats at both LRR and RRR, indicating less sensitivity of target tissue to ethanol hypnosis in the young of that strain. All age groups of the F-344 rats as well as the young BN/BIRIJ rats displayed lower brain concentrations of ethanol at RRR than at LRR, a finding opposite to that characteristic of acute tolerance. The relationship of LRR to RRR values did not differ among the age groups of F-344 rats. We conclude that the F-344 and BN/BIRIJ strains do not develop acute tolerance to ethanol hypnosis. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that animals with low ethanol preferences, such as the F-344 and BN/BIRIJ strains, also have low capabilities to develop acute tolerance to ethanol hypnosis.
PubMed ID
8142065 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerated lung function decline in swine confinement workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208355
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Senthilselvan
J A Dosman
S P Kirychuk
E M Barber
C S Rhodes
Y. Zhang
T S Hurst
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Agriculture
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cereals
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Saskatchewan
Smoking - physiopathology
Swine
Abstract
We conducted a longitudinal study to determine the annual rate decline in pulmonary function measurements in male swine confinement workers. For comparison, a grain farming group and a nonfarming rural-dwelling control group were also chosen for the longitudinal study. Two hundred seventeen swine confinement workers, 218 grain farmers, and 179 nonfarming control subjects had valid pulmonary function measurements at the baseline observation conducted in 1990 to 1991 and at the second observation conducted in 1994 to 1995. The swine confinement workers were younger (mean age=38.3+/-11.7 [SD] years) than the nonfarming control subjects (42.6+/-10.4 years) and the grain farmers (44.5+/-11.9 years). When stratified by age, nonfarming control subjects had the lowest mean annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC in all age categories. The swine confinement workers had the largest annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC, and this was most obvious in the middle age categories. After controlling for age, height, smoking, and baseline pulmonary function, swine confinement workers had excess annual decline of 26.1 mL in FEV1 (p=0.0005), 33.5 mL in FVC (p=0.0002), and 42.0 mL/s in forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF[25-75%]) (p=0.02) over nonfarming control subjects. Grain farmers had excess annual decline of 16.4 mL in FEV1 (p=0.03), 26.7 mL in FVC (p=0.002), and 11.2 mL/s in FEF(25-75%) (p=0.38) over control subjects. These findings suggest that workers engaged in the swine industry and grain farmers appear prone to accelerated yearly losses in lung function and may therefore be at risk for the future development of chronic airflow limitation.
PubMed ID
9187201 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accommodative function of eyes in persons exposed to ionizing radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50741
Source
Ophthalmic Res. 2002 Jul-Aug;34(4):192-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Sergienko
P. Fedirko
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Ukrainian Medical Academy of Post-Diploma Education, Kiev, Ukraine. NMS@micro.kiev.ua
Source
Ophthalmic Res. 2002 Jul-Aug;34(4):192-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Accommodation, Ocular - radiation effects
Adult
Aging - physiology
Control Groups
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Eye - radiation effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ukraine
Abstract
Results of a comparative study of accommodative capability of eyes in individuals exposed to various doses of ionizing radiation and in a control group are presented. The mean values for ranges of accommodation in the control group were consonant with previous data. However, the range of accommodation was found to be reduced in exposed patients from younger age groups. It has been established that the ranges of accommodation depended, besides the age, on the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation: the greater the dose absorbed, the lesser the range of accommodation in the same age group. The effect of ionizing radiation seems to be additive to that of age.
PubMed ID
12297690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of health disorders as a systemic measure of aging: Findings from the NLTCS data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80645
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2006 Nov;127(11):840-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Kulminski Alexander
Yashin Anatoli
Ukraintseva Svetlana
Akushevich Igor
Arbeev Konstantin
Land Kenneth
Manton Kenneth
Author Affiliation
Center for Demographic Studies, Duke University, 2117 Campus Drive, Box 90408, Durham, NC 27708, USA. Alexander.Kulminski@duke.edu
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2006 Nov;127(11):840-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Disease
Epidemiology
Female
Humans
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An index of age-associated health/well-being disorders (deficits), called the "frailty index" (FI), appears to be a promising characteristic to capture dynamic variability in aging manifestations among age-peers. In this study we provide further support toward this view focusing on the analysis of the FI age patterns in the participants of the National Long Term Care Survey (NLTCS). METHODS: The NLTCS assessed health and functioning of the U.S. elderly in 1982, 1984, 1989, 1994, and 1999. Detailed information for our sample was assessed from about 26,700 interviews. The individual FI is defined as a proportion of health deficits for a given person. RESULTS: The FI in the NLTCS exhibits accelerated age patterns. The acceleration is larger for elderly who, at younger ages, had a lower FI (low FI group) than for those who showed a higher FI at younger ages (high FI group). Age-patterns for low and high FI groups tend to converge at advanced ages. The rate of deficit accumulation is sex-sensitive. CONCLUSIONS: The accelerated FI age patterns suggest that FI can be considered as a systemic measure of aging process. Convergence of the (sex-specific) FI age patterns for low and high FI groups by extreme ages might reflect the limit of the FI-specific (or systemic) age as well as the limit of adaptation capacity in aging individuals.
PubMed ID
16978683 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative analysis of the level of the main properties of nervous processes in youths of different age groups]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34984
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1996;42(1-2):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
O P Nykonenko
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1996;42(1-2):59-64
Date
1996
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Higher Nervous Activity - physiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Photic Stimulation
Puberty - physiology
Abstract
It is found that youths at the ontogenesis stages from 11 to 21 years show a gradual increase in the parameters of their neurodynamic functions. The most significant increase in the growth rate of the functional mobility and of the strength of nervous processes is observed in youths at the initial stages of pubescence (14-15 years). At the final stages of their pubescence (16-17 years) the neurodynamic of youths is maximally approaching the adults' level.
PubMed ID
8991717 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active living among older Canadians: a time-use perspective over 3 decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116266
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jamie E L Spinney
Hugh Millward
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Geography, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):103-13
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Demography
Energy Metabolism
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Leisure Activities
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Exertion
Prevalence
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This research uses four nationally representative samples of time diary data, spanning almost 30 yr, that are fused with energy expenditure information to enumerate the median daily duration of moderate or vigorous effort activity, quantify the prevalence of Canadians age 65 yr and older who are meeting recommended daily levels of physical activity, and explore the factors affecting rates of active living. Results indicate that 41.1% of older Canadians met recommended levels of physical activity in 1992, 40.6% in 1998, 43.5% in 2005, and 39.6% in 2010. Both rates of active living and daily duration of aerobic activity exhibit significant differences among sociodemographic groups, with age, sex, activity limitation, urban-rural, and season exhibiting the most significant influences. This study illustrates the potential for time diary data to provide detailed surveillance of physical activity patterns, active aging research, and program development, as well.
PubMed ID
23416414 View in PubMed
Less detail

859 records – page 1 of 86.