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Aboriginal experiences of aging and dementia in a context of sociocultural change: qualitative analysis of key informant group interviews with Aboriginal seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137393
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Mar;26(1):103-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Shawnda Lanting
Margaret Crossley
Debra Morgan
Allison Cammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Arts Building, 9 Campus Drive, S7N 5A5 Saskatoon, SK, Canada. shawnda.lanting@usask.ca
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2011 Mar;26(1):103-17
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Evolution
Dementia - ethnology - psychology
Family
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Neuropsychological Tests
Qualitative Research
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Examining the role of culture and cultural perceptions of aging and dementia in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of age-related cognitive impairment remains an understudied area of clinical neuropsychology. This paper describes a qualitative study based on a series of key informant group interviews with an Aboriginal Grandmothers Group in the province of Saskatchewan. Thematic analysis was employed in an exploration of Aboriginal perceptions of normal aging and dementia and an investigation of issues related to the development of culturally appropriate assessment techniques. Three related themes were identified that highlighted Aboriginal experiences of aging, caregiving, and dementia within the healthcare system: (1) cognitive and behavioural changes were perceived as a normal expectation of the aging process and a circular conception of the lifespan was identified, with aging seen as going back "back to the baby stage", (2) a "big change in culture" was linked by Grandmothers to Aboriginal health, illness (including dementia), and changes in the normal aging process, and (3) the importance of culturally grounded healthcare both related to review of assessment tools, but also within the context of a more general discussion of experiences with the healthcare system. Themes of sociocultural changes leading to lifestyle changes and disruption of the family unit and community caregiving practices, and viewing memory loss and behavioural changes as a normal part of the aging process were consistent with previous work with ethnic minorities. This research points to the need to understand Aboriginal perceptions of aging and dementia in informing appropriate assessment and treatment of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia in Aboriginal seniors.
PubMed ID
21287400 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward embodied old age among Swedes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183373
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2003;56(2):133-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Peter Oberg
Lars Tornstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Sweden. peter.oberg@soc.uu.se
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2003;56(2):133-53
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Attitude - ethnology
Body Image
Culture
Data Collection
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sexuality - psychology
Social Perception
Sweden
Abstract
Messages in the consumer culture are often youth oriented, aiming at the prevention of the bodily decay associated with biological aging. In gerontological discourses, this has been hypothesized to generate negative attitudes toward embodied aging and old age. Studies about general attitudes toward old age show that younger respondents have more negative attitudes than do older respondents, and gerontological discourses also hypothesize a gendered ageism, with especially negative attitudes toward elderly women. The empirical study of embodied aging among 1,250 Swedes aged 20-85 years contradicts these hypotheses. The results show rather positive attitudes toward embodied old age, especially among young and middle-aged respondents. Neither do the results unequivocally confirm the hypothesis of gendered ageism, which predicts considerably more negative attitudes toward old women than toward old men. One interpretation of the results is that, counter to many hypotheses, the consumer culture, with its new opportunities and roles for old people, may positively affect these attitudes.
PubMed ID
14533854 View in PubMed
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Balancing within various discourses--the art of being old and living as a Sami woman.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80203
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2006 Nov-Dec;27(10):873-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aléx Lena
Hammarström Anne
Norberg Astrid
Lundman Berit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.alex@nurs.umu.se
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2006 Nov-Dec;27(10):873-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Narration
Questionnaires
Social Values
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Abstract
The aim of this part of the Umeå 85+ Study was to explore how indigenous women narrate their lives and their experience of being old as Sami women. Interviews with 9 old Sami women were analyzed using grounded theory. The categories identified were "reindeer as the basis of life," "longing for significant Sami values," "feeling valued as a Sami woman," and "changing for survival;" these evolved into the core category: "balancing within various discourses-the art of being old and living as a Sami woman." Knowing how to balance provided the ability to make use of available opportunities.
PubMed ID
17043029 View in PubMed
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The future of successful aging in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107702
Source
Pages 575-579 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):575-579
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Jordan Lewis
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. jplewis@uw.edu
Source
Pages 575-579 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):575-579
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
There is a paucity of research on Alaska Natives and their views on whether or not they believe they will age successfully in their home and community. There is limited understanding of aging experiences across generations.
This research explores the concept of successful aging from an urban Alaska Native perspective and explores whether or not they believe they will achieve a healthy older age.
A cultural consensus model (CCM) approach was used to gain a sense of the cultural understandings of aging among young Alaska Natives aged 50 years and younger.
Research findings indicate that aging successfully is making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life, abstaining from drugs and alcohol, but some of Alaska Natives do not feel they will age well due to lifestyle factors. Alaska Natives see the inability to age well as primarily due to the decrease in physical activity, lack of availability of subsistence foods and activities, and the difficulty of living a balanced life in urban settings.
This research seeks to inform future studies on successful aging that incorporates the experiences and wisdom of Alaska Natives in hopes of developing an awareness of the importance of practicing a healthy lifestyle and developing guidelines to assist others to age well.
Notes
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Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2003 Mar;58(2):S74-8212646596
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Cites: J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2006 Mar-Jun;21(1-2):1-2317106646
Cites: J Prev Interv Community. 2006;32(1-2):41-5917000601
Cites: Int J Aging Hum Dev. 1995;41(3):239-508666468
Cites: Science. 1987 Jul 10;237(4811):143-93299702
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Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;15(3):194-20117322132
PubMed ID
23984300 View in PubMed
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Inner strength in relation to age, gender and culture among old people--a cross-sectional population study in two Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113242
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(8):1016-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kerstin Viglund
Elisabeth Jonsén
Berit Lundman
Gunilla Strandberg
Björn Nygren
Author Affiliation
a Department of Nursing, Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(8):1016-22
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Culture
Databases, Factual
Female
Finland - ethnology
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
The theoretical framework for the study was the Model of Inner Strength, and the Inner Strength Scale (ISS)developed based on the Model was used. The aim was to examine inner strength in relation to age, gender and culture among old people in Sweden and Finland.
This study forms part of the GErontological Regional DAtabase (GERDA)-Botnia project that investigates healthy ageing with focus on the dignity, social participation and health of old people. The participants (N = 6119) were 65-, 70-, 75- and 80-year old and living in two counties in Sweden or Finland. The ISS consists of 20 items relating to four interrelated dimensions of inner strength, according to the Model of Inner Strength. The range of possible ISS scores is 20-120, a higher score denoting higher inner strength.
The result showed that the 65-year-old participants had the highest mean ISS score, with a decrease in score for every subsequent age. The lowest score was achieved by the 80-year-old participants. Women had slightly but significantly higher mean ISS scores than men. Only small differences were found between the counties.
The study population came from Sweden and Finland; still, despite the different backgrounds, patterns in the distribution of inner strength were largely similar. The present study provides basic and essential information about inner strength in a population of old people.
PubMed ID
23750849 View in PubMed
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Vignette methodology and culture-relevance: lessons learned through a project on successful aging with Iranian immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90106
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2009 Mar;24(1):93-114
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Torres Sandra
Author Affiliation
National Institute for the Study of Aging and Later Life, Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, 601 74, Norrköping, Sweden. sandra.torres@isv.liu.se
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2009 Mar;24(1):93-114
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Narration
Personal Satisfaction
Sweden
Abstract
It is a well-known fact that cultural values play an important role in the construction of aging and old-age related understandings. This is why ethnogerontologists have tried to expand the gerontological imagination by arguing that research needs to become more culturally-relevant. Tapping into the values that people uphold and the understandings of aging that are shaped by them is a challenging endeavor. This is especially the case if one does not share the cultural background of the people whose values one is studying. The same holds true when one wants to shed light on understandings that mainstream social gerontology regards as deviations from the norm. It is after all relatively easy to "impose the Western template" under such circumstances. Vignette methodology has been found to be particularly useful when studying value-laden understandings. This is why it is an appropriate method to consider when designing research that aims to avoid the imposition of the Western template. This article focuses on the pros and cons of this methodology while discussing some of the lessons learned from a project that explored how the construct of successful aging is understood by a group of Iranian immigrants to Sweden. It will be argued that vignettes are particularly useful when trying to shed culturally-relevant light on aging and old age-related understandings.
PubMed ID
19199017 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.