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The 1% of the population accountable for 63% of all violent crime convictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259131
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Falk, O
Wallinius, M
Lundström, S
Frisell, T
Anckarsäter, H
Kerekes, N
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Population-based studies on violent crime and background factors may provide an understanding of the relationships between susceptibility factors and crime. We aimed to determine the distribution of violent crime convictions in the Swedish population 1973-2004 and to identify criminal, academic, parental, and psychiatric risk factors for persistence in violent crime.
The nationwide multi-generation register was used with many other linked nationwide registers to select participants. All individuals born in 1958-1980 (2,393,765 individuals) were included. Persistent violent offenders (those with a lifetime history of three or more violent crime convictions) were compared with individuals having one or two such convictions, and to matched non-offenders. Independent variables were gender, age of first conviction for a violent crime, nonviolent crime convictions, and diagnoses for major mental disorders, personality disorders, and substance use disorders.
A total of 93,642 individuals (3.9%) had at least one violent conviction. The distribution of convictions was highly skewed; 24,342 persistent violent offenders (1.0% of the total population) accounted for 63.2% of all convictions. Persistence in violence was associated with male sex (OR 2.5), personality disorder (OR 2.3), violent crime conviction before age 19 (OR 2.0), drug-related offenses (OR 1.9), nonviolent criminality (OR 1.9), substance use disorder (OR 1.9), and major mental disorder (OR 1.3).
The majority of violent crimes are perpetrated by a small number of persistent violent offenders, typically males, characterized by early onset of violent criminality, substance abuse, personality disorders, and nonviolent criminality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24173408 View in PubMed
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Adolescent disclosure and concealment: longitudinal and concurrent associations with aggression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113486
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):335-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Chelom E Leavitt
David A Nelson
Sarah M Coyne
Craig H Hart
Author Affiliation
School of Family Life, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA.
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):335-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Russia
Self Report
Sex Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
This longitudinal study assessed the association between prior (preschool) and concurrent physical and relational aggression as they relate to Russian adolescents' disclosure and concealment patterns with their parents. In the initial preschool study, there were 106 boys and 106 girls (mean age?=?60.24 months, SD?=?7.81). Both peer nominations and teacher ratings of aggression were obtained for these children. Ten years later, the majority of these children (72.2%; n?=?153) completed a longitudinal follow-up battery of assessments. Included in these measures was a self-reported measure of aggression as well as an assessment of the extent to which these adolescents disclosed to and concealed information from their parents. Separate models were estimated by gender of child for the 153 children who participated in both Time 1 and Time 2 data collections. Preschool physical aggression proved an important longitudinal predictor of adolescent disclosure and concealment for girls. Concurrently, self-rated relational aggression was also significantly associated with concealment for both boys and girls.
PubMed ID
23720152 View in PubMed
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Adolescents born extremely preterm: behavioral outcomes and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138950
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anne-Li Hallin
Karin Stjernqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. anne-li.hallin@psychology.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):251-6
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aggression - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Aspirations (Psychology)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight - psychology
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence
Internal-External Control
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Quality of Life - psychology
Risk-Taking
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Fifty-two extremely premature born and 54 full-term controls were assessed regarding behavioral outcomes, risk-taking and self-perceived quality of life. Behavioral outcomes were assessed with the Achenbach Youth Self Report; risk-taking was estimated regarding alcohol and nicotine use; self-perceived quality of life and future expectations were rated; and attention and hyperactivity problems were surveyed retrospectively with the Wender Utah Rating Scale. The prematurely born reported fewer problems than full-term born on the externalizing scale (delinquent behavior and aggressive behaviour); and they reported less alcohol consumption. No difference was observed between the two groups concerning nicotine use, views about quality of life and expectations for the future or in the retrospective assessment of attention and hyper-activity problems. Conclusively, the prematurely born adolescents described a quality of life and future expectations comparable to full-term born controls. They also reported fewer behavioral problems and less risk-taking behavior.
PubMed ID
21121924 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perception of bullying: who is the victim? Who is the bully? What can be done to stop bullying?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87357
Source
Adolescence. 2007;42(168):749-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Frisén Ann
Jonsson Anna-Karin
Persson Camilla
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Box 500, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Adolescence. 2007;42(168):749-61
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - methods
Adult
Age Factors
Aggression - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Dominance-Subordination
Female
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Self Concept
Sex Distribution
Social Perception
Sweden
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The main aim of this study was to describe adolescents' perceptions and experiences of bullying: their thoughts about why children and adolescents are bullied, their ideas about why some bully others, and what they believe is important in order to stop bullying. The adolescents were asked about experiences throughout their school years. The study group was comprised of 119 high school students, with a mean age of 17.1 (SD = 1.2). Of the adolescents who reported, 39% indicated that they had been bullied at some time during their school years and 28% said that they had bullied others; 13% reported being both victims and bullies. The ages during which most students had been bullied at school were between 7 and 9 years. Bullies reported that most of the bullying took place when they were 10 to 12 years old. The most common reason as to why individuals are bullied was that they have a different appearance. The participants believe that those who bully suffer from low self-esteem. The most common response to the question "What do you think makes bullying stop?" was that the bully matures. The next most frequent response was that the victim stood up for himself/herself. Those who were not involved in bullying during their school years had a much stronger belief that victims can stand up for themselves than did the victims themselves.
PubMed ID
18229509 View in PubMed
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Adult attachment and male aggression in couple relationships: the demand-withdraw communication pattern and relationship satisfaction as mediators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142530
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2011 Jul;26(10):1982-2003
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Benoit Fournier
Audrey Brassard
Phillip R Shaver
Author Affiliation
Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2011 Jul;26(10):1982-2003
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Anxiety - psychology
Canada
Communication
Counseling
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Spouses - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines men's domestic aggression as a function of attachment insecurities, considering the mediating roles of the demand-withdraw communication pattern and relationship satisfaction. The sample included 55 Canadian men undergoing counseling for relationship difficulties including aggression. The men completed questionnaires assessing physical and psychological aggression, the two dimensions of attachment insecurity (anxiety over abandonment and avoidance of intimacy), the demand-withdraw communication pattern, relationship satisfaction, and social desirability (a control measure). As predicted, there was an association between attachment anxiety and aggression (both physical and psychological), which was mediated by the man demands/woman withdraws (MD/WW) pattern (as reported by the men). There was no evidence of mediation by the woman demands/man withdraws pattern, as reported by the men. Relationship satisfaction mediated the association between attachment anxiety and psychological (but not physical) aggression, but did not mediate the link between avoidance and aggression (physical or psychological). Limitations and clinical implications are discussed.
PubMed ID
20587474 View in PubMed
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Affect regulation and psychopathology in women with borderline personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118764
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Rune Andersen
Nina Timmerby
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Forskningsenhed, Region Sjælland, Roskilde, Denmark. runan@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Affective Symptoms - etiology
Aggression - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Denmark
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - etiology
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Psychopathology
Self Report
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology
Translating
Abstract
Dysfunction in affect regulation is a prominent feature that grossly impairs behavioural and interpersonal domains of experience and underlies a great deal of the psychopathology in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, no study has yet been published that evaluates the psychometric properties of the translated Danish version of self-report measures sensitive to the different aspects and dimensions of dysfunction in affect regulation prevalent in BPD.
This study comprised a group of women diagnosed with BPD (n = 29) and a comparison group of healthy subjects (n = 29) who reported psychopathology and levels of affective instability, aggression, impulsivity and alexithymia by self-report measures.
Our results demonstrated that women with BPD have significant psychopathology and report significantly higher levels of dysfunction in separate components of affect regulation by self-report measures than the comparison group of healthy subjects. Our results also provided partial support for the psychometric appropriateness and clinical relevance of the translated Danish version of affect regulation measures.
The normative reference range indicated by our results makes the measures useful as a practical assessment tool.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
23171744 View in PubMed
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Age and vengeance as predictors of mild driver aggression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176072
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):469-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Dwight A Hennessy
David L Wiesenthal
Author Affiliation
Buffalo State College, NY, USA. hennesda@buffalostate.edu
Source
Violence Vict. 2004 Aug;19(4):469-77
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Anger
Automobile Driving - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Violence
Abstract
The present study examined the influence of driver age and vengeance on mild aggression among drivers with at least 5 years experience. Mild aggression decreased with age among low vengeance drivers and changed little across age groups among moderately vengeful drivers. However, mild driver aggression actually increased with age among highly vengeful drivers. Results are interpreted in terms of the aggressive nature of an enduring vengeful attitude.
PubMed ID
15726939 View in PubMed
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Age of Entry Into Early Childhood Education and Care as a Predictor of Aggression: Faint and Fading Associations for Young Norwegian Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278580
Source
Psychol Sci. 2015 Oct;26(10):1595-607
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Eric Dearing
Henrik Daae Zachrisson
Ane Nærde
Source
Psychol Sci. 2015 Oct;26(10):1595-607
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Care - organization & administration
Child Day Care Centers
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Socioemotional risks associated with nonparental care have been debated for decades, and research findings continue to be mixed. Yet few studies have been able to test the causal hypothesis that earlier, more extensive, and longer durations of nonmaternal care lead to more problems. To examine the consequences of age of entry into nonparental care for childhood aggression, we used prospective longitudinal data from Norway, where month of birth partly determines age of entry into Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) centers. In this sample of 939 children followed from ages 6 months through 4 years, ECEC teachers reported the children's aggression when they were 2, 3, and 4 years old. We found some evidence that age of entry into ECEC predicted aggression at age 2, albeit modestly and not robustly. Between the ages of 2 and 4 years, the effect of age of entry on aggression faded to negligible levels. The implications for psychological science and policy are discussed.
PubMed ID
26276671 View in PubMed
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Aggression and body image concerns among anabolic androgenic steroid users, contemplators, and controls in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266745
Source
Body Image. 2015 Jan;12:6-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Ida Heimly Jenssen
Kim Berg Johannessen
Source
Body Image. 2015 Jan;12:6-13
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Anabolic Agents - adverse effects
Body Image - psychology
Doping in Sports - psychology
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
AAS users and contemplators were investigated for differences in aggression and body image concern. Prevalence rates were sought as a secondary aim. 396 male adolescents at Norwegian high schools completed a questionnaire battery during school hours. Prevalence of AAS use showed 4.0%; AAS contemplation showed 5.1%. No significant differences between the AAS users and contemplators were found on levels of aggression and body image concern. AAS users and contemplators reported significantly higher levels of aggression and body image concern compared nonusing controls. AAS contemplators enhance understanding of AAS use by representing psychosocial factors contributing to increased aggression, and AAS use or risk thereof indicative of an aggressive personality profile. Body image concerns for AAS users and contemplators may indicate that AAS use does not diminish body image concern, and that body image concern is a risk factor for AAS use. This is supportive of previous research.
PubMed ID
25261635 View in PubMed
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Aggression and sociometric status among peers: do gender and type of aggression matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199100
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2000 Mar;41(1):17-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
C. Salmivalli
A. Kaukiainen
K. Lagerspetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland. tiina.salmivalli@utu.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2000 Mar;41(1):17-24
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Aggression - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Sex Characteristics
Social Class
Social Desirability
Abstract
The connections between the use of different types of aggression (direct physical, direct verbal, and indirect) and sociometric status among same-sex and opposite-sex peers were studied. The subjects were 209 ninth-grade adolescents. Although an adolescent's aggression in general was related to being rejected by peers, a different picture emerged when the shared variance between types of aggression was controlled: The partial correlations showed that when the level of direct (physical and verbal) aggression was kept constant, increases in indirect aggression did not explain variance in peer rejection scores. On the contrary, the use of indirect aggression contributed (especially among boys) to social acceptance by peers. The direct (physical and verbal) forms of aggression were unrelated to adolescents' social acceptance scores. No clear differences were detected between girls' and boys' acceptance or rejection of their aggressive peers, despite the finding that boys seemed to tolerate indirect aggression better than girls did.
PubMed ID
10731839 View in PubMed
Less detail

282 records – page 1 of 29.