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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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5-year incidence of age-related maculopathy in the Reykjavik Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51922
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 Jan;112(1):132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Fridbert Jonasson
Arsaell Arnarsson
Tunde Peto
Hiroshi Sasaki
Kazuyuki Sasaki
Alan C Bird
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. fridbert@landspitali.is
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 Jan;112(1):132-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Macular Degeneration - classification - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
PURPOSE: To examine the age- and gender-specific 5-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in citizens of Reykjavik. DESIGN: Population-based, prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: The cohort was a population-based random sample of citizens 50 years and older. Of 1379 eligible subjects, 1045 had a baseline examination in 1996; 846 of the 958 survivors (88.2%) had a 5-year follow-up examination in 2001. METHODS: The incidence of various characteristics of drusen and pigmentary changes that are typical of ARM were determined using the international classification and grading system for ARM and AMD. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Early ARM and AMD were assessed by masked grading of stereo fundus photographs. RESULTS: Hypopigmentation developed at 5 years in 10.7% of people 50 to 59 years of age (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-14.4) and in 25.7% those 70 to 79 years of age (95% CI, 18.4-33.0) at baseline. Age-related macular degeneration developed in no one who was 50 to 59 years of age at baseline. Geographic atrophy (GA) developed in 4.6% (95% CI, 1.2-7.9) and exudative AMD in none of those who were 70 years and older at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Geographic atrophy is the predominant type of AMD in Iceland, and the ratio of GA to neovascular AMD is higher than in racially similar populations.
PubMed ID
15629833 View in PubMed
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The 7-year cumulative incidence of cornea guttata and morphological changes in the corneal endothelium in the Reykjavik Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126926
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2013 May;91(3):212-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Gunnar M Zoega
Arsaell Arnarsson
Hiroshi Sasaki
Per G Söderberg
Fridbert Jonasson
Author Affiliation
Gullstrand Lab, Ophthalmology, Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2013 May;91(3):212-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cell Count
Corneal Diseases - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Corneal Pachymetry
Descemet Membrane - pathology
Endothelium, Corneal - pathology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine the corneal endothelium and establish the 7-year cumulative incidence of cornea guttata (CG).
Population-based prospective cohort study with 573 participants (third wave of the Reykjavik Eye Study (RES) in 2008). Four hundred and thirty-seven subjects had either right or left eyes available for analysis after excluding confounding eye conditions. The baseline for eyes at risk for developing CG is the second wave of the RES in 2001. Participants underwent specular microscopy and a standardized eye examination.
The cumulative 7-year incidence of CG in either eye was estimated as a 95% confidence interval for the expected value for both genders combined (15-23%), for males (8-18%) and for females (19-29%). In right eye only, the 7-year cumulative incidence for both genders combined was estimated to be 6-11%. For genders combined and for males only, the data indicated no correlation between 7-year cumulated incidence and age at baseline. In women, however, the change of 7-year incidence for CG in at least one eye appeared to be correlated to age at baseline. Reduction of endothelial cell density for corneas with CG at baseline was found [CI (0.95)-132 ± 94].
The cumulative 7-year incidence of primary central CG for a middle-aged and older Caucasian population without history of potentially confounding eye disease has been established. Women tend to have higher incidence if onset occurs at middle age. If CG is present, the cell density and the cell size variation decrease within a 7-year period.
PubMed ID
22339815 View in PubMed
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10 year follow up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9689
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2003
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Nina Wandall-Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. merete.nordentoft@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Date
Jul-12-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, and to identify predictors of death such as conditions during upbringing, mental illness, and misuse of alcohol and drugs. DESIGN: Register based follow up study. SETTING: Two hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 579 people who stayed in one hostel in Copenhagen in 1991, and a representative sample of 185 people who stayed in the original hostel and one other in Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cause specific mortality. RESULTS: The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for both sexes was 3.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 4.1); 2.8 (2.6 to 3.1) for men and 5.6 (4.3 to 6.9) for women. The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for suicide for both sexes was 6.0 (3.9 to 8.1), for death from natural causes 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9), for unintentional injuries 14.6 (11.4 to 17.8), and for unknown cause of death 62.9 (52.7 to 73.2). Mortality was comparatively higher in the younger age groups. It was also significantly higher among homeless people who had stayed in a hostel more than once and stayed fewer than 11 days, compared with the rest of the study group. Risk factors for early death were premature death of the father and misuse of alcohol and sedatives. CONCLUSION: Homeless people staying in hostels, particularly young women, are more likely to die early than the general population. Other predictors of early death include adverse experiences in childhood, such as death of the father, and misuse of alcohol and sedatives.
PubMed ID
12855527 View in PubMed
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[10-year follow-up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 26;166(18):1679-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2004

A 10-year incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a defined population in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122426
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Johan Styrke
Britt-Marie Stålnacke
Per-Olof Bylund
Peter Sojka
Ulf Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. johan.styrke@surgery.umu.se
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Automobiles
Bicycling
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Incidence
Insurance Claim Reporting - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Centers
Whiplash Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a geographic catchment area in Northern Sweden during the period 2000-2009.
Descriptive epidemiology determined by prospectively collected data from a defined population.
The study was conducted at a public hospital in Sweden.
The population of the hospital's catchment area (136,600 inhabitants in 1999 and 144,500 in 2009).
At the emergency department, all injured persons (approximately 11,000 per year) were asked to answer a questionnaire about the injury incident. Data from the medical records also were analyzed. From 2000-2009, 15,506 persons were injured in vehicle crashes. Persons who were subject to an acute neck injury within whiplash-associated disorder grades 1-3 were included. The overall and annual incidences were calculated as incidence. Age, gender, type of injury event, and direction of impact were described. The incidences were compared with national statistics on insurance claims from 2003, 2007, and 2008 to detect changes in the proportions of claims.
The annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries. Secondary outcome measures were types of injury events, age and gender distribution, changes in the proportion of rear-end crashes during 2000-2009, and changes in the proportion of insurance claims during 2003-2008.
During 2000-2009, 3297 cases of acute whiplash injury were encountered. The overall incidence was 235/100,000/year. The average yearly increase in incidence was 1.0%. Women comprised 51.9% and men 48.1% of the injured. Car occupants (86.4%) and bicycle riders (6.1%) were most frequently injured. The proportion of rear-end crashes decreased from 55% to 45% from 2000-2009. The proportion of insurance claims significantly decreased between 2003 and 2008 (P
PubMed ID
22819305 View in PubMed
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A 10-year population-based cohort analysis of cataract surgery rates in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162363
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2007 Aug;42(4):552-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Wendy V Hatch
Geta Cernat
Shaun Singer
Chaim M Bell
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2007 Aug;42(4):552-6
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cataract - epidemiology
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We studied the rates and distribution of cataract surgery throughout Ontario using population-based administrative data.
We identified patients who had had cataract surgery performed between April 1, 1994, and March 31, 2005. We calculated crude cataract surgery rates, overall and regional adjusted rates per 100,000 residents aged 65 and over, and age- and sex-specific rates.
The number of cataract surgeries performed on patients over 65 more than doubled, from 43,818 to 90,183, over the 10-year period and accounted for approximately 81% of all cataract surgeries in Ontario. Age- and sex-adjusted rates varied considerably among health administrative geographic regions. For 2004-2005, rates including all cataract surgeries ranged from 4272 to 6563 cataract surgeries per 100,000 residents aged 65 or older.
There has been a significant increase in the number of cataract surgeries performed over the past decade in Ontario with considerable regional variation. Observed rates were higher than those reported for other countries.
PubMed ID
17641696 View in PubMed
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16-year excess all-cause mortality of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147637
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:400
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lars J Hansen
Niels de Fine Olivarius
Volkert Siersma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, The Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. l.hansen@gpract.ku.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:400
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Studies have shown that type 2 diabetic patients have higher all-cause mortality than people without diabetes, but it is less clear how diabetes affects mortality in elderly patients and to what degree mortality differs between diabetic men and women. The aim of the present study is to investigate the age- and sex-specific all-cause mortality pattern in patients with type 2 diabetes in comparison with the Danish background population.
Population-based cohort study of 1323 patients, diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes in 1989-92 and followed for 16 years. Median (interquartile range) age at diagnosis was 65.3 (55.8-73.6) years. The age- and sex-specific hazard rates were estimated for the cohort using the life table method and compared with the expected hazard rates calculated with Danish register data from the general population.
In comparison with the general population, diabetic patients had a 1.5-2.5 fold higher risk of dying depending on age. The over-mortality was higher for men than for women. It decreased with age in both sexes, and among patients over 80 years at diagnosis the difference between the observed and the expected survival was small.
We found an excess mortality of type 2 diabetic patients compared with the background population in all age groups. The excess mortality was most pronounced in men and in young patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19878574 View in PubMed
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The AAA with a challenging neck: outcome of open versus endovascular repair with standard and fenestrated stent-grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88967
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Chisci Emiliano
Kristmundsson Thorarinn
de Donato Gianmarco
Resch Timothy
Setacci Francesco
Sonesson Björn
Setacci Carlo
Malina Martin
Author Affiliation
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Siena, Italy. e.chisci@gmail.com
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Italy
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) versus conventional open repair (OR) in patients with a short, angulated or otherwise challenging proximal neck. METHODS: The definition of a challenging proximal neck was based on diameter (>or=28 mm), length (or=60 degrees ), shape (reverse tapered or bulging), and thrombus lining (>50%). Between January 2005 and December 2007, 187 consecutive patients (159 men; mean age 73 years, range 48-92) operated for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were identified as having challenging proximal neck morphology. Of these, 61 patients were treated with OR at center I (group A), 71 with standard EVAR (group B; 45 center I, 29 center II) and 52 with fenestrated EVAR (group C) at center II. Clinical examination and computed tomography were performed at 1 month and yearly thereafter. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups A, B, and C regarding primary technical success rate, 30-day mortality, or late AAA-related mortality. The mean length of follow-up was 19.5 months (range 0-40). Freedom from reintervention at 3 years was 91.8%, 79.7%, and 82.7% for groups A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.042). The only statistically significant difference between standard and fenestrated EVAR was a higher incidence of late sac expansion [9 (12.2%) versus 1 (1.9%), p = 0.036] in the standard stent-graft group. Reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR (p = NS), but open reinterventions were more common after OR. Reinterventions after EVAR were related to the presence of an angulated (p = 0.039) or short neck (p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The results of EVAR and OR were similar for AAAs with a challenging proximal neck. Endovascular reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR, particularly in patients with an angulated or short neck. Open reinterventions were more common after OR. More patients and long-term data are needed to confirm these findings.
Notes
Comment In: J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):147-819456195
PubMed ID
19456190 View in PubMed
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Abductor Muscle Function and Trochanteric Tenderness After Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281385
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Aleksandra Hanas
Olof G Sköldenberg
Sebastian S Mukka
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - diagnosis - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Hemiarthroplasty - adverse effects - methods
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - therapy
Prospective Studies
Psoas Muscles - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the abductor muscle function and trochanteric tenderness in patients operated with hemiarthroplasty using the direct lateral (DL) or posterolateral (PL) approach for displaced femoral neck fracture.
Prospective cohort study.
A secondary teaching hospital.
We enrolled 183 hips operated with hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fracture using the DL or PL approach.
Preoperatively, we evaluated the Harris hip score (HHS) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). At 1 year postoperatively, lucid patients were clinically examined to evaluate the Trendelenburg sign, abductor muscle strength with a dynamometer, and trochanteric tenderness with an electronic algometer. The 1-year HHS and EQ-5D were documented.
The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative Trendelenburg sign, whereas the secondary outcomes included patients' reported limp, abductor muscle strength, trochanteric tenderness, HHS, and EQ-5D.
There were 48 patients (24 in the DL group and 24 in the PL group) who attended the 1-year clinical follow-up. The 2 groups were comparable (P > 0.05). The DL group showed a higher incidence of the Trendelenburg sign (9/24 vs. 1/24, P = 0.02) and limp (12/24 vs. 2/24, P = 0.004). Further analysis with logistic regression showed the surgical approach to be the only factor that resulted in the increment. No differences regarding HHS, EQ-5D, abductor muscle strength, algometer pressure pain threshold, and radiologic measurements were found (P > 0.05).
The incidence of the Trendelenburg sign and limp were significantly higher in the DL approach although this seemed not to influence abductor muscle strength or the incidence of trochanteric tenderness or compromise the clinical outcome.
Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
PubMed ID
27206260 View in PubMed
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2199 records – page 1 of 220.