Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1175 records – page 1 of 118.

2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Jan 20;342(3):145-5310639539
Cites: Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:2122397368
Cites: Am J Med. 2000 Nov;109(7):538-4211063954
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2001 Aug;108(4):635-611518739
Cites: Diabetologia. 2001 Sep;44 Suppl 2:S54-6411587051
Cites: Circulation. 2001 Nov 27;104(22):2673-811723017
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Dec;24(12):2043-811723080
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Jan 12;324(7329):71-8611786451
Cites: Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2002 May 3;127(18):953-711987015
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2002 Aug;23(16):1267-7512175663
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Oct;25(10):1845-5012351489
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2004 Oct;97(1):21-415336801
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1985 Mar;6(3):199-2262863148
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 1989 Sep-Oct;2(5):358-672698218
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1994 Jul;7(7 Pt 1):615-227946163
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Nov 19;344(8934):1383-97968073
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Mar 4;310(6979):555-97888928
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1996 Mar;19(3):257-678742574
Cites: Diabetologia. 1996 Dec;39(12):1577-838960845
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1998 Sep;21(9):1529-339727904
Cites: Circ Res. 1999 Mar 19;84(5):489-9710082470
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1999 Jun;22(6):920-410372242
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 Jul;34(1):146-5410400004
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Aug 21;354(9179):617-2110466661
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2004 Nov;25(22):1990-715541834
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2005 Aug 1;96(3):363-516054458
Cites: Diabet Med. 2005 Sep;22(9):1212-716108851
Cites: Clin Ther. 2005;27 Suppl B:S42-5616519037
Cites: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2007 Jan;27(1):60-617204040
Cites: Circ J. 2007 Jun;71(6):834-4117526977
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Jul 10;116(2):151-717576864
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Nov 27;116(22):2634-5317951284
Cites: Heart Vessels. 2009 Mar;24(2):90-519337791
Cites: Prim Care Diabetes. 2009 Nov;3(4):205-919875348
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2010 Jan;33 Suppl 1:S62-920042775
Cites: Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2010;9:7521070650
Cites: Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2011;10:5621702911
Cites: Hypertension. 2000 Aug;36(2):245-910948085
PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
Less detail

The AAA with a challenging neck: outcome of open versus endovascular repair with standard and fenestrated stent-grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88967
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Chisci Emiliano
Kristmundsson Thorarinn
de Donato Gianmarco
Resch Timothy
Setacci Francesco
Sonesson Björn
Setacci Carlo
Malina Martin
Author Affiliation
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Siena, Italy. e.chisci@gmail.com
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Italy
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) versus conventional open repair (OR) in patients with a short, angulated or otherwise challenging proximal neck. METHODS: The definition of a challenging proximal neck was based on diameter (>or=28 mm), length (or=60 degrees ), shape (reverse tapered or bulging), and thrombus lining (>50%). Between January 2005 and December 2007, 187 consecutive patients (159 men; mean age 73 years, range 48-92) operated for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were identified as having challenging proximal neck morphology. Of these, 61 patients were treated with OR at center I (group A), 71 with standard EVAR (group B; 45 center I, 29 center II) and 52 with fenestrated EVAR (group C) at center II. Clinical examination and computed tomography were performed at 1 month and yearly thereafter. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups A, B, and C regarding primary technical success rate, 30-day mortality, or late AAA-related mortality. The mean length of follow-up was 19.5 months (range 0-40). Freedom from reintervention at 3 years was 91.8%, 79.7%, and 82.7% for groups A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.042). The only statistically significant difference between standard and fenestrated EVAR was a higher incidence of late sac expansion [9 (12.2%) versus 1 (1.9%), p = 0.036] in the standard stent-graft group. Reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR (p = NS), but open reinterventions were more common after OR. Reinterventions after EVAR were related to the presence of an angulated (p = 0.039) or short neck (p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The results of EVAR and OR were similar for AAAs with a challenging proximal neck. Endovascular reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR, particularly in patients with an angulated or short neck. Open reinterventions were more common after OR. More patients and long-term data are needed to confirm these findings.
Notes
Comment In: J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):147-819456195
PubMed ID
19456190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abductor Muscle Function and Trochanteric Tenderness After Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281385
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Aleksandra Hanas
Olof G Sköldenberg
Sebastian S Mukka
Source
J Orthop Trauma. 2016 Jun;30(6):e194-200
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - diagnosis - surgery
Follow-Up Studies
Hemiarthroplasty - adverse effects - methods
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - therapy
Prospective Studies
Psoas Muscles - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the abductor muscle function and trochanteric tenderness in patients operated with hemiarthroplasty using the direct lateral (DL) or posterolateral (PL) approach for displaced femoral neck fracture.
Prospective cohort study.
A secondary teaching hospital.
We enrolled 183 hips operated with hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fracture using the DL or PL approach.
Preoperatively, we evaluated the Harris hip score (HHS) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D). At 1 year postoperatively, lucid patients were clinically examined to evaluate the Trendelenburg sign, abductor muscle strength with a dynamometer, and trochanteric tenderness with an electronic algometer. The 1-year HHS and EQ-5D were documented.
The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative Trendelenburg sign, whereas the secondary outcomes included patients' reported limp, abductor muscle strength, trochanteric tenderness, HHS, and EQ-5D.
There were 48 patients (24 in the DL group and 24 in the PL group) who attended the 1-year clinical follow-up. The 2 groups were comparable (P > 0.05). The DL group showed a higher incidence of the Trendelenburg sign (9/24 vs. 1/24, P = 0.02) and limp (12/24 vs. 2/24, P = 0.004). Further analysis with logistic regression showed the surgical approach to be the only factor that resulted in the increment. No differences regarding HHS, EQ-5D, abductor muscle strength, algometer pressure pain threshold, and radiologic measurements were found (P > 0.05).
The incidence of the Trendelenburg sign and limp were significantly higher in the DL approach although this seemed not to influence abductor muscle strength or the incidence of trochanteric tenderness or compromise the clinical outcome.
Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
PubMed ID
27206260 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to osteoporosis treatment is critically linked to access to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161794
Source
Med Care. 2007 Sep;45(9):896-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Suzanne M Cadarette
Monique A M Gignac
Susan B Jaglal
Dorcas E Beaton
Gillian A Hawker
Author Affiliation
Osteoporosis Research Program, Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. s.cadarette@utoronto.ca
Source
Med Care. 2007 Sep;45(9):896-901
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - utilization
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mass Screening - utilization
Ontario - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
To determine if inequities in access to osteoporosis investigation [dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) testing] and treatment (bisphosphonate, calcitonin, and/or raloxifene) exist among older women in a region with universal health care coverage.
Community-dwelling women aged 65-89 years residing within 2 regions of Ontario, Canada were randomly sampled. Data were collected by standardized telephone interview. Potential correlates of DXA testing (verified by physician records), and current treatment were grouped by type as: "predisposing characteristics," "enabling resources," or "need factors" based on hypothesized relationships formulated before data collection. Variables associated with each outcome independent of "need factors" identified inequities in the system.
Of the 871 participants (72% response rate), 55% had been tested by DXA and 20% were receiving treatment. Using multiple variable logistic regression to adjust for need factors, significant inequities in access to DXA testing existed by age, health beliefs, education, income, use of preventive health services, region, and provider sex. DXA testing mediated access to treatment; 34% of those having had a DXA were treated compared with 2% of those who did not. Among women with osteoporosis, correctly reporting that their DXA test indicated osteoporosis and higher perceived benefits of taking pharmacological agents for osteoporosis were associated with treatment.
Significant inequities in access to fracture prevention exist in a region with universal health care coverage. Improved access to DXA and better communication to patients of both their DXA results and the benefits of treatment has the potential to reduce the burden of osteoporosis.
PubMed ID
17712261 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy and quality in the nursing documentation of pressure ulcers: a comparison of record content and patient examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77064
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gunningberg Lena
Ehrenberg Anna
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. lena.gunningberg@akademiska.se
Source
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004 Nov-Dec;31(6):328-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Documentation - standards
Female
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Records - standards
Observer Variation
Physical Examination - nursing - standards
Practice Guidelines
Pressure Ulcer - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy and describe the quality of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers in a hospital care setting. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was used comparing retrospective audits of nursing documentation of pressure ulcers to previous physical examinations of patients. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: All inpatient records (n = 413) from February 5, 2002, at the surgical/orthopedic (n = 144), medical (n = 182), and geriatric (n = 87) departments of one Swedish University hospital. INSTRUMENTS: The European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel data collection form and the Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation. METHODS: All 413 records were reviewed for presence of notes on pressure ulcers; the findings were compared with the previous examination of patients' skin condition. Records with notes on pressure ulcers (n = 59) were audited using the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Comprehensiveness In Nursing Documentation instruments. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of pressure ulcers obtained by audit of patient records was 14.3% compared to 33.3% when the patients' skin was examined. The lack of accuracy was most evident in the documentation of grade 1 pressure ulcers. The quality of the nursing documentation of pressure ulcer (n = 59) was generally poor. CONCLUSIONS: Patient records did not present valid and reliable data about pressure ulcers. There is a need for guidelines to support the care planning process and facilitate the use of research-based knowledge in clinical practice. More attention must be focused on the quality of clinical data to make proper use of electronic patient records in the future.
PubMed ID
15867708 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accuracy of predicting cardiovascular death based on one compared to several albuminuria values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260540
Source
Kidney Int. 2014 Jun;85(6):1421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Gudrun Hatlen
Solfrid Romundstad
Stein I Hallan
Source
Kidney Int. 2014 Jun;85(6):1421-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albumins - metabolism
Albuminuria - diagnosis - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - mortality
Creatinine - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Urinalysis
Abstract
Albuminuria is a well-documented predictor of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. However, day-to-day variability is substantial, and there is no consensus on the number of urine samples required for risk prediction. To resolve this we followed 9158 adults from the population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study for 13 years (Second HUNT Study). The predictive performance of models for CV death based on Framingham variables plus 1 versus 3 albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was assessed in participants who provided 3 urine samples. There was no improvement in discrimination, calibration, or reclassification when using ACR as a continuous variable. Difference in Akaike information criterion indicated an uncertain improvement in overall fit for the model with the mean of 3 urine samples. Criterion analyses on dichotomized albuminuria information sustained 1 sample as sufficient for ACR levels down to 1.7?mg/mmol. At lower levels, models with 3 samples had a better overall fit. Likewise, in survival analyses, 1 sample was enough to show a significant association to CV mortality for ACR levels above 1.7?mg/mmol (adjusted hazard ratio 1.37; 95% CI 1.15-1.63). For lower ACR levels, 2 or 3 positive urine samples were needed for significance. Thus, multiple urine sampling did not improve CV death prediction when using ACR as a continuous variable. For cutoff ACR levels of 1.0?mg/mmol or less, additional urine samples were required, and associations were stronger with increasing number of samples.
PubMed ID
24352157 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activated and total coagulation factor VII, and fibrinogen in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54392
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Danielsen
P T Onundarson
H. Thors
B. Vidarsson
J H Morrissey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Landspítalinn, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - metabolism
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - metabolism - surgery
Coronary Thrombosis - metabolism
Disease Progression
Factor VII - biosynthesis
Factor VIIa - biosynthesis
Female
Fibrinogen - biosynthesis
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Fibrinogen (FBG) and total coagulation factor VII (FVIIc) concentrations are higher in those patients with coronary artery disease who are at increased future risk of acute ischemic events. The relationship between activated factor VII (FVIIa) and cardiovascular events, however, has not been intensively studied. Data were collected from 401 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease. Conventional risk factors FVIIc, FVIIa and FBG were assessed in relation to the severity of coronary artery disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, and previous clinical events. A strong positive correlation was found between FVIIa and FVIIc (p
PubMed ID
9636964 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active and passive smoking and the risk of myocardial infarction in 24,968 men and women during 11 year of follow-up: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116011
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;28(8):659-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Birgitte Iversen
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 9037, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;28(8):659-67
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Active smoking is a well-established risk factor for myocardial infarction, but less is known about the impact of passive smoking, and possible sex differences in risk related to passive smoking. We investigated active and passive smoking as risk factors for myocardial infarction in an 11-year follow-up of 11,762 men and 13,206 women included in the Tromsø Study. There were a total of 769 and 453 incident cases of myocardial infarction in men and women, respectively. We found linear age-adjusted relationships between both active and passive smoking and myocardial infarction incidence in both sexes. The relationships seem to be stronger for women than for men. Age-adjusted analyses indicated a stronger relationship with passive smoking in ever-smokers than in never-smokers. After adjustment for important confounders (body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and physical activity) the associations with active and passive smoking were still statistically significant. Adjusting for active smoking when assessing the effect of passive smoking and vice versa, indicated that the effect of passive smoking in men may be explained by their own active smoking. In women, living with a smoker =30 years after the age of 20 increased the myocardial infarction risk by 40 %, even after adjusting for active smoking. Passive smoking is a risk factor for myocardial infarction on its own, but whereas the effect for men seems to be explained by their own active smoking, the effect in females remains statistically significant.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Oct;19(5):927-3421859780
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2012;12:14322978749
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2003 Jul-Aug;46(1):11-2912920698
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Jun;89(6):2745-915181052
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Jul 24;329(7459):200-515229131
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Apr;70(4):420-27361965
Cites: Circulation. 1996 Feb 1;93(3):450-68565161
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;50(4):475-99179106
Cites: Heart. 2010 Jun;96(11):854-920478864
Cites: Maturitas. 2010 Feb;65(2):149-6019897327
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Aug 19;368(9536):647-5816920470
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Mar 24;352(12):1223-3615788499
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):961-721422063
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2011 Jun;18(3):467-7421450650
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Oct 8;378(9799):1297-30521839503
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Dec 1;172(11):1306-1420843863
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 May 30;118(14):2165-89656812
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Mar 25;340(12):920-610089185
PubMed ID
23443581 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute and long-term outcome of cryoablation therapy of typical atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95190
Source
Europace. 2009 Aug;11(8):1077-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Bastani Hamid
Schwieler Jonas
Insulander Per
Tabrizi Fariborz
Braunschweig Frieder
Kennebäck Göran
Drca Nikola
Sadigh Bita
Jensen-Urstad Mats
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology at the Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, S-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. hamid.bastani@karolinska.se
Source
Europace. 2009 Aug;11(8):1077-82
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Cryosurgery - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry - epidemiology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
AIMS: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cryoablation in a large series of patients with typical (slow-fast) atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 2003 and 2007, 312 patients with typical AVNRT--median age of 53 years (range 10-92), 200 women (64%)--underwent cryoablation, using exclusively a 6 mm tip catheter tip. Acute success was achieved in 309 of 312 patients (99%). The overall recurrence rate was 18 of 309 (5.8%) during a mean follow-up of 673 +/- 381 days. Sixteen of these patients (89%) were successfully reablated. The recurrence rate was 9% in patients with residual dual atrioventricular (AV) nodal pathway post-ablation compared with 4% in those with complete elimination of slow pathway conduction (P = 0.05). No patient developed permanent AV block. CONCLUSION: Cryoablation of AVNRT can be achieved with a high acute success rate and a reasonable recurrence rate at long-term follow-up. Complete abolition of slow pathway conduction seems to predict better late outcome.
PubMed ID
19578176 View in PubMed
Less detail

1175 records – page 1 of 118.