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23423 records – page 1 of 2343.

ß2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms, asthma and COPD: two large population-based studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129736
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
M. Thomsen
B G Nordestgaard
A A Sethi
A. Tybjærg-Hansen
M. Dahl
Author Affiliation
Dept of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2012 Mar;39(3):558-66
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Incidence
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - genetics
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The ß(2)-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) is an important regulator of airway smooth muscle tone. We tested the hypothesis that three functional polymorphisms in the ADRB2 gene (Thr164Ile, Gly16Arg and Gln27Glu) are associated with reduced lung function, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We first genotyped 8,971 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study for all three polymorphisms. To validate our findings, we genotyped an additional 53,777 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study for the Thr164Ile polymorphism. We identified 60,910 Thr164Ile noncarriers, 1,822 heterozygotes and 16 homozygotes. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Thr164Ile genotype was associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) % predicted (trend p = 0.01) and FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) (p = 0.001): Thr164Ile heterozygotes had 3% and 2% reduced FEV(1) % pred and FEV(1)/FVC, respectively, compared with noncarriers. The odds ratio for COPD in Thr164Ile heterozygotes was 1.46 (95% CI 1.05-2.02). In the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Thr164 genotype associated with reduced FEV(1) % pred (p = 0.04) and FEV(1)/FVC (p
PubMed ID
22075484 View in PubMed
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2D:4D finger length ratio and reproductive indices in a Chuvashian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108304
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):617-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leonid Kalichman
Valery Batsevich
Eugene Kobyliansky
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):617-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fingers - anatomy & histology - radiography
Humans
Male
Menarche
Menopause
Metacarpal Bones - anatomy & histology - radiography
Middle Aged
Reproduction
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
to evaluate the association between 2D:4D finger length ratios (representing the prenatal environment, i.e., early androgen exposure) and reproductive indices, such as age at menarche, menopausal age, and length of reproductive period.
Retrospective data on age at menarche and menopausal age as well as x-rays of both hands were obtained from 674 Chuvashian women aged 18-70 years (mean 46.32?±?15.42). Finger and metacarpal length ratios as well as visual classification of finger ratio types, were estimated from the x-rays.
We found that a low 2D:4D ratio (radiologically evaluated), a masculine 2D:4D ratio type (visually evaluated), and a putative bioassay for prenatal androgen exposure, were associated with a later menarche and a shorter reproductive period. No association was found with menopausal age.
PubMed ID
23907730 View in PubMed
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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up study of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195752
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
G. Sjögren
S O Hedlund
C. Jonsson
A. Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Materials Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Goran.Sjogren@odont.umu.se
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bicuspid
Ceramics - chemistry
Color
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Marginal Adaptation
Dental Plaque - classification
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Glass - chemistry
Humans
Inlays - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Molar
Quartz - chemistry
Surface Properties
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.
Nine Class I and 30 Class II beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations were placed in 16 patients who were seen regularly by personnel at Umeå University Dental School. The California Dental Association criteria were used to evaluate the restorations at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years after luting. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity, the time taken to manufacture each restoration, and certain periodontal conditions were also evaluated.
Sixty-nine percent of the restorations were rated satisfactory at the 3-year examination. During the follow-up period, 4 became loose and 7 were fractured or had flaking surfaces. Caries was registered in connection with 1 restoration. Excellent ratings were obtained for marginal integrity, anatomic form, surface, and color in 62%, 84%, 32%, and 44% of the restorations, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing in comparison with the controls. The mean overall time for placement was 38 minutes. The estimated survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 59% after 3.5 years.
The quality of the beta-quartz glass-ceramic restorations in the present study was inferior to that presented in most earlier studies of ceramic or resin composite posterior restorations placed in patients treated at university clinics. Both the technique and the beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have to be evaluated in more long-term studies to assess the possibility of their serving as an alternative restorative technique.
PubMed ID
11203902 View in PubMed
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5-aminosalicylic acid dependency in Crohn's disease: a Danish Crohn Colitis Database study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138932
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2010 Nov;4(5):575-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Dana Duricova
Natalia Pedersen
Margarita Elkjaer
Jens K Slott Jensen
Pia Munkholm
Author Affiliation
Clinical and Research Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, ISCARE a.s. and Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. dana.duricova@seznam.cz
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2010 Nov;4(5):575-81
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Crohn Disease - drug therapy
Denmark
Drug Utilization
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Mesalamine - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The role of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in Crohn's disease is unclear. The outcome of the first course of 5-ASA monotherapy with emphasis on 5-ASA dependency was retrospectively assessed in consecutive cohort of 537 Crohn's disease patients diagnosed 1953-2007.
Following outcome definitions were used: Immediate outcome (30 days after 5-ASA start) defined as complete/partial response (total regression/improvement of symptoms) and no response (no regression of symptoms with a need of corticosteroids, immunomodulator or surgery). Long-term outcome defined as prolonged response (still in complete/partial response 1 year after induction of response); 5-ASA dependency (relapse on stable/reduced dose of 5-ASA requiring dose escalation to regain response or relapse =1 year after 5-ASA cessation regaining response after 5-ASA re-introduction).
One hundred sixty-five (31%) patients had monotherapy with 5-ASA. In 50% 5-ASA monotherapy was initiated =1 year after diagnosis (range 0-49 years). Complete/partial response was obtained in 75% and no response in 25% of patients. Thirty-six percent had prolonged response, 23% developed 5-ASA dependency and 38% were non-responders in long-term outcome. Female gender had higher probability to develop prolonged response or 5-ASA dependency (OR 2.89, 95%CI: 1.08-7.75, p=0.04). The median duration (range) of 5-ASA monotherapy was 34 months (1-304) in prolonged responders, 63 (6-336) in 5-ASA dependent and 2 (0-10) in non-responders.
A selected phenotype of Crohn's disease patients may profit from 5-ASA. Fifty-nine percent of patients obtained long-term benefit with 23% becoming 5-ASA dependent. Prospective studies are warranted to assess the role of 5-ASA in Crohn's disease.
PubMed ID
21122562 View in PubMed
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5-a reductase inhibitors, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and risk of male breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271757
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Sep;26(9):1289-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Robinson D
Garmo H
Holmberg L
Stattin P
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Sep;26(9):1289-97
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms, Male - chemically induced - pathology
Cohort Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia - drug therapy - pathology
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
5-a reductase inhibitors (5-ARI) have been suggested to increase the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to study the risk of breast cancer in men on 5-ARI, in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) not on 5-ARI, and in men without BPH.
We performed a population-based cohort study in Sweden with data from The Prescribed Drug Register, The Patient Register, and The Cancer Register. Men on 5-ARI, men on a-blockers, or men who had undergone a transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) prior to or during 2006-2008 were included as exposed to BPH and a specific treatment thereof. For each exposed man, five unexposed men were selected. Risk of breast cancer was calculated in Cox proportional hazard models.
There were 124,183 exposed men and 545,293 unexposed men, and during follow-up (median 6 years), 99 men with breast cancer were diagnosed. Compared to unexposed men, men on 5-ARI had a hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer of 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-2.03), men on a-blockers had HR 1.47 (95% CI 0.73-2.95), and men with a TUR-P had HR 1.99 (95% CI 1.05-3.75).
No increased risk of breast cancer was observed for men on 5-ARI. However, the increased risk of breast cancer among men who had undergone a TUR-P, a strong indicator of BPH, suggests that the endocrine milieu conducive to BPH is associated with male breast cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26109464 View in PubMed
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5-FU split dose; a phase I/II and pharmacokinetic study of a different schedule of the Nordic regimen in advanced colorectal carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18358
Source
Anticancer Res. 2003 Mar-Apr;23(2C):1789-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ake Berglund
G�¶ran Carlsson
Bengt Gustavsson
Jan-Erik Fr�¶din
Peter Ragnhammar
Bengt Glimelius
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, University of Uppsala, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden. ake.berglund@onkologi.uu.se
Source
Anticancer Res. 2003 Mar-Apr;23(2C):1789-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic - administration & dosage - adverse effects - blood - pharmacokinetics
Colorectal Neoplasms - blood - drug therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage - adverse effects - blood - pharmacokinetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
PURPOSE: Despite more than four decades of fluoro-pyrimidine treatment in different cancers, the optimal schedule is still not known. The plasma half-life of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is extremely short and continuous infusion has gained popularity. In this study we explored whether repeated bolus 5-FU injections could improve the results. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-three patients with advanced gastrointestinal carcinoma, where no standard treatment was available, were included in the phase I study. The initial dose of 5-FU was 250 mg/m2 with 30 mg/m2 leucovorin, repeated three hours later. Treatments were repeated every week. Twenty-six patients were recruited in the following phase II after maximal-tolerated dose (MTD) was reached. Plasma was collected for 5-FU pharmacokinetics. RESULTS: Diarrhoea was the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and was reached at 450 mg/m2. One complete and three partial responses (24%) were seen in the phase II study at 400 mg/m2. In addition, several patients had lasting subjective improvements. The treatments were well-tolerated but accumulated toxicity was seen after several months. Dose intensity was 89% after four months of treatment. A great interpatient variability was seen in 5-FU pharmacokinetics. The plasma AUC correlated with the 5-FU dose and toxicity, but not with the tumour response. CONCLUSION: A split of the 5-FU push bolus injection is possible with maintained treatment activity and surprisingly high doses can be tolerated; a weekly dose intensity of 800 mg/m2 could be reached compared with 500 mg/m2 in the standard Nordic FLv schedule.
PubMed ID
12820460 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up of occlusal status and radiographic findings in mandibular condyles of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187416
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Miira M Vehkalahti
Jaakko S Peltola
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Dentition
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Dentures
Dislocations - classification - radiography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification - rehabilitation
Logistic Models
Male
Mandibular Condyle - radiography
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis - classification - radiography
Osteosclerosis - classification - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - radiography
Abstract
The aim of the present 5-year follow-up was to clarify the nature of occlusal support status and radiographic changes in condyles of the elderly, and the association between these two variables.
The present study is part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914. A total of 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 to 1991, and after 5 years a total of 103 were reexamined. Comprehensive data on occlusal support status were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88 subjects. Occlusal support status was assessed on the basis of the Eichner index, radiographic changes were assessed from panoramic radiographs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were assessed using Helkimo's anamnestic index.
The most frequent radiographic finding in the mandibular joint was flattening of the articular surface of the condyle associated with osteoarthrosis, found at baseline in 17% and during follow-up in 13% of the subjects. During the 5-year follow-up, Eichner index for natural dentition remained unaltered in 94% of the subjects and in 85% of the subjects when removable dentures were included. There were no radiographic changes in 92% of the cases. No differences based on age or gender were found. A logistic regression model revealed associations between the selected baseline factors. The odds ratio for baseline Helkimo's anamnestic index was 4.1, 5.7 for Eichner index with the support of removable dentures, and 356 for radiographic findings.
Radiographic changes in condyles of elderly people were small during the 5-year follow-up, but baseline radiographic findings, Helkimo's anamnestic index, and Eichner index with removable dentures were risk factors for radiographic findings at the end of the follow-up.
PubMed ID
12475158 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up of older adults residing in long-term care facilities: utilisation of a comprehensive dental programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149106
Source
Gerodontology. 2009 Dec;26(4):282-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Chris C L Wyatt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. cwyatt@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Gerodontology. 2009 Dec;26(4):282-90
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Comprehensive Dental Care - organization & administration - utilization
Dental Care for Aged - organization & administration - utilization
Dental Caries - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes
Periodontal Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study will compare the clinical outcomes of 139 elders residing in long-term care (LTC) who received dental treatment with those who did not receive care under a comprehensive dental programme over 5 years.
Numerous studies have documented very poor oral health and limited access to dental care among frail older adults residing in LTC facilities. The University of British Columbia and Providence Healthcare developed a comprehensive dental programme to serve elderly LTC residents within seven Vancouver hospitals. Since 2002, the Geriatric Dentistry Programme has provided annual oral health assessments and access to comprehensive dental care.
A comprehensive oral health assessment was provided using CODE (an index of Clinical Oral Disorders in Elders). A change in oral health status (improvement or worsening) was evaluated by measuring CODE scores including caries and periodontal condition, and other aspects of the dentition.
Eighty-three residents received dental treatment of some form over the 5 years, while 56 did not receive any treatment beyond an annual examination. The percentage of residents initially recommended for treatment in 2002 was 97%, which declined to 70-73% after the 3rd year. The percentage of residents treated increased after the first year and remained at 56-72% thereafter. The comparison between CODE scores from baseline and 5 years later showed an improvement for those receiving care (p = 0.02, chi(2) = 7.9, df = 2).
Within the limitations of this study, residents who did consent and receive care showed an improvement in their oral health status after 5 years.
PubMed ID
19682096 View in PubMed
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23423 records – page 1 of 2343.