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23619 records – page 1 of 2362.

Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Jun;62(6):1184
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Grace Farris
Author Affiliation
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Jun;62(6):1184
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Geriatrics
Humans
Siberia
PubMed ID
24925552 View in PubMed
Less detail

Copper deficiency in Canadian octogenarians?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156375
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2008 Jun;11(3):697-8; author reply 699-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Leslie M Klevay
Source
Rejuvenation Res. 2008 Jun;11(3):697-8; author reply 699-700
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Copper - deficiency
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Rejuvenation Res. 2007 Sep;10(3):301-917559335
PubMed ID
18593289 View in PubMed
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Life-space mobility assessment in older people in Finland; measurement properties in winter and spring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259870
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:323
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Erja Portegijs
Susanne Iwarsson
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Taina Rantanen
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2014;7:323
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Finland
Humans
Movement
Seasons
Abstract
Life-space mobility refers to the spatial area an individual moves through, the frequency and need for assistance. Based on the assumption that measurement scale properties are context-specific, we tested the scale distribution, responsiveness, and reproducibility of the 15-item University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment in older people in Finland, specifically accounting for season.
Community-dwelling older men and women in central Finland aged 75-90 years were interviewed to determine life-space mobility (score range 0-120). Baseline (January-June 2012) and one-year follow-up data (January-June 2013; n?=?806) from the cohort study "Life-space mobility in old age" were used to investigate the scale distribution and responsiveness over a period of one year. In addition, with a sub-sample in conjunction with the one-year follow-up, we collected data to study the two-week test-retest reproducibility (n?=?18 winter and n?=?21 spring 2013).
The median life-space mobility score at baseline was 64. The median change in score over the one-year follow-up was zero. However, participants reporting a decline in health (repeated measures ANOVA p?=?.016) or mobility (p?=?.002) status demonstrated a significantly larger decrease in life-space mobility score than those reporting no or positive changes over the year. The two-week intra-class correlation (ICC) coefficient was .72. Lower ICC was found in the winter than in the spring sample and for items that represent higher life-space levels.
The test-retest reproducibility of the Life-Space Assessment was fair but somewhat compromised in the winter. Mobility of older people at the life-space levels of "town" and "beyond town" may be more variable. Life-space mobility was responsive to change, regardless of season. Further study is warranted to obtain insight in the factors contributing to seasonal effects.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24886670 View in PubMed
Less detail

[100-year-old who refused to be revived].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267575
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jörg Carlsson
Niels Lynøe
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Medical Futility
Sweden
PubMed ID
25584605 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abstracts of the 2nd European Congress on Nutrition and Health in the Elderly, May 9-12, 1996, Elsinore Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61948
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 1997;1(2):69-92
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
1997
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 1997;1(2):69-92
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Geriatrics
Health status
Humans
Nutrition
PubMed ID
16491531 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The eight decade--heart massage-no, thank you].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194254
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jun 4;163(23):3244-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2001
Author
A. Tuxen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jun 4;163(23):3244-5
Date
Jun-4-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Heart Massage
Humans
Resuscitation Orders
PubMed ID
11421198 View in PubMed
Less detail

Unravelling Swedish informal caregivers' Generalised Resistance Resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281603
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2016 Sep;30(3):602-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Mia M T Wennerberg
Monica Eriksson
Ella Danielson
Solveig M Lundgren
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2016 Sep;30(3):602-13
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
Interlinked aspects, as demographic changes, accentuation on home-based community care, increase the amount of informal caregivers to older adults. To preserve and enhance their health are subsequently essential and a reoccurring topic on political agendas. How this may be achieved is vividly debated and mainly focused on elimination of risks and stresses associated with caregiving. Within health promotion, the salutogenic approach focusing on resources to health is recognised and this approach was used to acquire necessary knowledge to enhance caregivers' health 'the salutogenic way'.
To present Generalised and Specific Resistance Resources (GRRs/SRRs) described by caregivers as stemming from themselves and their carerecipients.
To unravel caregivers' GRRs/SRRs, a theory-driven, explorative design guided by definitions of GRRs/SRRs was utilised. Data were collected through salutogenically guided interviews with 32 Swedish caregivers in one municipality. Inductively, data were analysed using content analysis to identify each caregiver's SRRs and thereafter deduction to identify the population's GRRs.
The synthesis of findings, caregivinghood, encompasses several domains of GRRs seemingly involved in caregivers' movements towards health. In the caregiver domain, 'Being someone significant in my own eyes' unites the essence of having access to GRRs stemming from oneself and 'Being "blessed" with a co-operative co-worker' that of having access to GRRs stemming from the carerecipient. This may be the core in an orientation to life which creates positive life experiences, since it enables caregivers to find a 'fit' between the possible and desired when resolving challenges.
Health-promoting initiatives should be conducted as partnerships between formal and informal sources due to the versatility of GRRs. It also seems essential to empower both parties so that they may make sense of their situation and use their available GRRs/SRRs in this 'joint venture' of managing. Thereby, their motivation to continue the journey through Caregivinghood may be enhanced.
PubMed ID
26530836 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes on technical devices among the elderly, aged 74 years or over.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207248
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1998;48:411-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K. Koski
H. Luukinen
S L Kivelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1998;48:411-3
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Technology
PubMed ID
10186559 View in PubMed
Less detail

Response bias in a health status survey of elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230822
Source
Age Ageing. 1989 May;18(3):177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1989
Author
K. Rockwood
P. Stolee
D. Robertson
E R Shillington
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Age Ageing. 1989 May;18(3):177-82
Date
May-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Health Surveys
Humans
Patient compliance
Saskatchewan
Abstract
This paper compares respondents and non-respondents from the community sample of the Saskatchewan Health Status Survey of the Elderly. Response bias was assessed by comparing the demographic characteristics and use of health care services of the two groups. A stratified two-stage area probability sample was drawn from a comprehensive sampling frame. There were 1614 subjects eligible; interviews were completed with 1267 (78.5%). In the very elderly (85+ years) cohort, disproportionately more urban dwellers and more males were interviewed; the sample was otherwise demographically representative of the elderly population. Non-respondents, especially the very elderly, used significantly more medical services than respondents, and had a higher number of hospital admissions. Non-respondents over age 75 experienced significantly longer average lengths of stay. On average, non-respondents used approximately 15% more hospital days. Non-respondents over age 75 appear to be more likely to experience ill health than respondents. Hence, statistics from this survey are conservative estimates of the ill health of the elderly.
PubMed ID
2782215 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 30;118(9):1374-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-1998
Author
K. Noreik
J A Børresen
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for sosialmedisin Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 30;118(9):1374-6
Date
Mar-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Longevity
Male
Norway
Abstract
We recorded the highest age at the time of death for both men and women in Norway for the years 1970 to 1995. During this period longevity increased by approximately one year; for women from 106 to 107 years and for men from 105 to 106 years. Based on Gumbel's theory, we have estimated the most probable highest age for the next 10, 20, and 100 years. For women this was found to be 109, 110 and 113 years, respectively; for men the corresponding ages were 108, 109 and 112 years. Our aim must be that as many men and women as possible live to a high age, that their latter years are meaningful, and that they enjoy a high standard of living.
PubMed ID
9599501 View in PubMed
Less detail

23619 records – page 1 of 2362.