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Do weather changes influence physical activity level among older adults? - The Generation 100 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297393
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0199463
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Nils Petter Aspvik
Hallgeir Viken
Jan Erik Ingebrigtsen
Nina Zisko
Ingar Mehus
Ulrik Wisløff
Dorthe Stensvold
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Political Science, Faculty of Social and Educational Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(7):e0199463
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Exercise
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Norway
Public Health Surveillance
Seasons
Temperature
Weather
Abstract
Understanding how individual and environmental factors impact physical activity (PA) level is important when building strategies to improve PA of older adults. No studies have examined how hour-to-hour weather changes influence PA in older adults or how the association between weather and PA eventually is related to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) measured as peak oxygen uptake. The aim of this study was therefore to examine how hour-to-hour changes in weather effects hour-to-hour PA in a cohort of Norwegian older adults across CRF levels, gender and seasons.
PA was assessed objectively in 1219 older adults (70-77 years, 51% females) using the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer, and quantified as counts·min-1 (CPM). Weather (Norwegian meteorological Institute) and CRF (MetaMax II) were measured objectively. Panel data analysis added a longitudinal dimension when 110.888 hours of weather- and PA data were analyzed.
Older adults had a higher PA level in warmer (597 CPM) than colder months (556 CPM) (p
PubMed ID
29979711 View in PubMed
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Effects of resistance training frequency on cardiorespiratory fitness in older men and women during intervention and follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291897
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2017 09; 95:44-53
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2017
Author
Elena Fernández-Lezaun
Moritz Schumann
Tuomas Mäkinen
Heikki Kyröläinen
Simon Walker
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences and Neuromuscular Research Center, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2017 09; 95:44-53
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Biomarkers - blood
Body Composition
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Exercise Test
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Heart rate
Hematocrit
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Lactic Acid - blood
Male
Muscle strength
Oxygen consumption
Resistance Training - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of resistance training (RT) performed with different frequencies, including a follow-up period, on cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy older individuals. Eighty-eight men and women (69±3years, 167±9cm and 78±14kg) were randomly placed into four groups: training one- (M1=11, W1=12), two- (M2=7, W2=14), or three- (M3=11, W3=13) times-per-week or a non-training control group (MCon=11, WCon=9). During months 1-3, all subjects trained two-times-per-week while during the subsequent 6months, training frequency was set according to the group. Oxygen consumption (cycling economy: CE), gross efficiency (GE), blood lactate concentrations (La) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated during a submaximal cycle ergometer test. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), heart rate (HRrest) and body composition by DXA were also measured at rest. Maximal strength was measured by a 1-RM leg press test. Most improvements in CE, GE, La and HR occurred in all groups during months 1-3. No additional statistically significant improvements were observed during months 4-9, although effect sizes for the change in CE and GE at higher workloads indicated a dose-response pattern in men (CE at 75W: M1 g=0.13, M2 g=-0.58, M3 g=-0.89; 100W: M1 g=0.43, M2 g=-0.59, M3 g=-0.68) i.e. higher training frequency (two- and three-times-per-week versus one-time-per-week) led to greater improvements once the typical plateau in performance had occurred. Hb increased in W1 and W2, while no changes were observed in Hct or HRrest. 1-RM increased from months 1-3 in all intervention groups (except M2) and from month 4-9 only in M3 and in all women intervention groups. During follow-up, maximal strength was maintained but cycling economy returned to the baseline values in all training groups. These data indicate that RT led to significant improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness during the initial 3months of training. This was partly explained by the RT protocol performed but further improvements may require higher training frequency. These changes are likely to be originated by the improved cardiorespiratory functions rather than neuromuscular adaptations evidenced by a lack of significant relationship during the intervention as well as the divergent results during follow-up.
PubMed ID
28526625 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life in older patients with acute coronary syndrome randomised to an invasive or conservative strategy. The After Eighty randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294203
Source
Age Ageing. 2018 Jan 01; 47(1):42-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-01-2018
Author
Nicolai Tegn
Michael Abdelnoor
Lars Aaberge
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Knut Endresen
Erik Gjertsen
Rita Skårdal
Lars Gullestad
Bjørn Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Age Ageing. 2018 Jan 01; 47(1):42-47
Date
Jan-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - diagnostic imaging - psychology - therapy
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - diagnostic imaging - psychology - therapy
Conservative Treatment - adverse effects
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction - diagnostic imaging - psychology - therapy
Norway
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
in the After Eighty study (ClinicalTrials.gov.number, NCT01255540), patients aged 80 years or more, with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), and unstable angina pectoris (UAP), were randomised to either an invasive or conservative management approach. We sought to compare the effects of these management strategies on health related quality of life (HRQOL) after 1 year.
the After Eighty study was a prospective randomised controlled multicenter trial. In total, 457 patients aged 80 or over, with NSTEMI or UAP, were randomised to either an invasive strategy (n = 229, mean age: 84.7 years), involving early coronary angiography, with immediate evaluation for percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass graft, optimal medical therapy, or to a conservative strategy (n = 228, mean age: 84.9 years). The Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36) was used to assess HRQOL at baseline, and at the 1-year follow-up.
baseline SF-36 completion was achieved for 208 and 216 patients in the invasive and conservative groups, respectively. A total of 137 in the invasive group and 136 patients in the conservative group completed the SF-36 form at follow-up. When comparing the changes from follow-up to baseline (delta) no significant changes in quality-of-life scores were observed between the two strategies in any of the domains, expect for a small but statistically significant difference in bodily pain. This difference in only one of the SF-36 subscales may not necessarily be clinically significant.
from baseline to the 1 year follow-up, only minor differences in change of HRQOL as measured by SF-36 were seen by comparing an invasive and conservative strategy.
NCT01255540.
PubMed ID
28985265 View in PubMed
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Photophobia and Seasonal Variation of Migraine in a Subarctic Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291606
Source
Headache. 2017 Sep; 57(8):1206-1216
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Svein I Bekkelund
Kai I Müller
Aleksander Wilhelmsen
Karl B Alstadhaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Headache. 2017 Sep; 57(8):1206-1216
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Migraine Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Photoperiod
Photophobia - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Factors
Telemedicine
Abstract
To investigate associations between photophobia and seasonal variation of migraine.
In this cross-sectional study, migraineurs consecutively recruited were referred to a specialist center located above the Arctic Circle at 68-71 degrees North during a 2.5-year period. Data were obtained through a structured interview.
In total, 302 migraineurs with a mean (±SD) age of 35.5 (±12.6) years were included. Patients who reported seasonal variation of migraine (n = 90; 29.8%) also reported more often interictal photophobia than the others (61/90, 67.8% vs 92/212, 43.4%, P?
PubMed ID
28631303 View in PubMed
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Preventive oral health intervention among old home care clients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291908
Source
Age Ageing. 2017 Sep 01; 46(5):846-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Sep-01-2017
Author
Annamari Nihtilä
Eveliina Tuuliainen
Kaija Komulainen
Kirsi Autonen-Honkonen
Irma Nykänen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Riitta Ahonen
Miia Tiihonen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Age Ageing. 2017 Sep 01; 46(5):846-851
Date
Sep-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Caregivers
Cognition
Dental Plaque - microbiology - prevention & control
Dental Plaque Index
Denture Cleansers - therapeutic use
Dentures - microbiology
Female
Finland
Geriatric Assessment
Home Care Services
Humans
Male
Mouthwashes - therapeutic use
Nurses, Community Health
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - instrumentation - methods
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Time Factors
Toothbrushing
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
poor oral health is common among older people dependent on supportive care and it affects their quality of life. Cognitive impairment and functional dependency may increase the risk of compromised daily oral hygiene.
to investigate the effectiveness of a tailored preventive oral health intervention among home care clients aged 75 years or over.
the intervention group comprised 151 patients (84.4 ± 5.6 years) and the control group 118 patients (84.7 ± 5.2 years). An interview and a clinical examination were carried out before a tailored intervention of oral and denture hygiene. The participants in both groups were re-interviewed and re-examined after 6 months.
the intervention significantly reduced the number of plaque covered teeth and improved denture hygiene. In addition, functional ability and cognitive function were significantly associated with better oral hygiene.
the intervention had a positive effect on oral hygiene, however the number of teeth with plaque remained high, even after the intervention. Multiple approaches based on individual needs are required to improve the oral health of vulnerable older adults, including integrating dental preventive care into daily care plan carried out by home care nurses.
PubMed ID
28200017 View in PubMed
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The Swedish infant high-grade reflux trial: UTI and renal damage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291022
Source
J Pediatr Urol. 2017 Apr; 13(2):146-154
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Josefin Nordenström
Sofia Sjöström
Ulla Sillén
Rune Sixt
Per Brandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Surgery, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: josefin.nordenstrom@vgregion.se.
Source
J Pediatr Urol. 2017 Apr; 13(2):146-154
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Age Factors
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - methods
Child, Preschool
Cystoscopy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Kidney Diseases - diagnostic imaging - etiology - physiopathology
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Urodynamics
Urography - methods
Vesico-Ureteral Reflux - complications - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology
Abstract
High-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children is associated with recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal damage. Breakthrough UTI despite continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) during the first years of life is a matter of concern and evokes early intervention. We investigated whether early endoscopic treatment (ET) of VUR grade 4-5 can reduce the risk of UTI recurrence and renal scarring.
This prospective, randomized, controlled, multicentre, 1-year follow-up trial comprised 77 infants,
Notes
CommentIn: J Pediatr Urol. 2017 Apr;13(2):155 PMID 28341424
CommentIn: J Pediatr Urol. 2017 Apr;13(2):156-157 PMID 28392010
PubMed ID
28215835 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.