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(90)Sr in King Bolete Boletus edulis and certain other mushrooms consumed in Europe and China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275929
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Michal Saniewski
Tamara Zalewska
Grazyna Krasinska
Natalia Szylke
Yuanzhong Wang
Jerzy Falandysz
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2016 Feb 1;543(Pt A):287-94
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Basidiomycota - chemistry
China
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The (90)Sr activity concentrations released from a radioactive fallout have been determined in a range of samples of mushrooms collected in Poland, Belarus, China, and Sweden in 1996-2013. Measurement of (90)Sr in pooled samples of mushrooms was carried out with radiochemical procedure aimed to pre-isolate the analyte from the fungal materials before it was determined using the Low-Level Beta Counter. Interestingly, the Purple Bolete Imperator rhodopurpureus collected from Yunnan in south-western China in 2012 showed (90)Sr activity concentration at around 10 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass, which was greater when compared to other mushrooms in this study. The King Bolete Boletus edulis from China showed the (90)Sr activity in caps at around 1.5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass (whole fruiting bodies) in 2012 and for specimens from Poland activity was well lower than 1.0 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass in 1998-2010. A sample of Sarcodonimbricatus collected in 1998 from the north-eastern region of Poland impacted by Chernobyl fallout showed (90)Sr in caps at around 5 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. Concentration of (90)Sr in Bay Bolete Royoporus (Xerocomus or Boletus) badius from affected region of Gomel in Belarus was in 2010 at 2.1 Bq kg(-1) dry biomass. In several other species from Poland (90)Sr was at
PubMed ID
26590866 View in PubMed
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210Po, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms and ingestion doses to man from high consumption rates of these wild foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119426
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Anna Nalbandyan
Geir Rudolfsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, The Fram Centre, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway. justin.gwynn@nrpa.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Angiosperms
Basidiomycota
Eating
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper discusses activity concentrations of (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms collected from Øvre Dividalen national park, Northern Norway and derives committed effective ingestion doses to man based on high consumption rates of these wild foods. Edible wild berries and mushrooms accumulated similar levels of (210)Pb, but mushrooms accumulated higher levels of (210)Po and (40)K than berries. There appears to be a clear difference in the ability of Leccinum spp. of fungi to accumulate (210)Po and/or translocate (210)Po to mushrooms compared to Russula spp. of fungi. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms from Øvre Dividalen national park reflected the lower levels of fallout of this radionuclide in Northern Norway compared to more central areas following the Chernobyl accident. For mushrooms, ingestion doses are dominated by (210)Po, while for berries, (40)K is typically the main contributor to dose. Based on high consumption rates, ingestion doses arising from the combination of (210)Po, (210)Pb and (40)K were up to 0.05 mSv/a for berries and 0.50 mSv/a for mushrooms. Consumption of such wild foods may result in a significant contribution to total annual doses when consumed in large quantities, particularly when selecting mushrooms species that accumulate high activity concentrations of (210)Po.
PubMed ID
23103573 View in PubMed
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Accumulation and distribution of mercury in fruiting bodies by fungus Suillus luteus foraged in Poland, Belarus and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276806
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Martyna Saba
Jerzy Falandysz
Innocent C Nnorom
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Mercury - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Poland - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Republic of Belarus - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Spectrophotometry, Atomic - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Sweden - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Vegetables - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Presented in this paper is result of the study of the bioconcentration potential of mercury (Hg) by Suillus luteus mushroom collected from regions within Central, Eastern, and Northern regions of Europe. As determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy, the Hg content varied from 0.13 ? 0.05 to 0.33 ? 0.13 mg kg(-1) dry matter for caps and from 0.038 ? 0.014 to 0.095 ? 0.038 mg kg(-1) dry matter in stems. The Hg content of the soil substratum (0-10 cm layer) underneath the fruiting bodies showed generally low Hg concentrations that varied widely ranging from 0.0030 to 0.15 mg kg(-1) dry matter with mean values varying from 0.0078 ? 0.0035 to 0.053 ? 0.025 mg kg(-1) dry matter, which is below typical content in the Earth crust. The caps were observed to be on the richer in Hg than the stems at ratio between 1.8 ? 0.4 and 5.3 ? 2.6. The S. luteus mushroom showed moderate ability to accumulate Hg with bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 3.6 ? 1.3 to 42 ? 18. The consumption of fresh S. luteus mushroom in quantities up to 300 g week(-1) (assuming no Hg ingestion from other foods) from background areas in the Central, Eastern, and Northern part of Europe will not result in the intake of Hg exceeds the provisional weekly tolerance limit (PTWI) of 0.004 mg kg(-1) body mass.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26446731 View in PubMed
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Antiproliferative Activity and Cytotoxicity of Some Medicinal Wood-Destroying Mushrooms from Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295154
Source
Int J Med Mushrooms. 2018; 20(1):1-11
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Alla V Shnyreva
Anastasia A Shnyreva
Cesar Espinoza
José M Padrón
Ángel Trigos
Author Affiliation
Department of Mycology and Algology, Faculty of Biology, Moscow Lomonosov State University, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Int J Med Mushrooms. 2018; 20(1):1-11
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry - classification - genetics - physiology
Cell Line, Tumor
Cell Proliferation
Cellulose - metabolism
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - chemistry - isolation & purification
HEK293 Cells
Hela Cells
Humans
Lethal Dose 50
Lignans - metabolism
Phylogeny
Prospective Studies
Russia
Trametes - chemistry - genetics - isolation & purification
Wood - metabolism
Abstract
We analyzed the antiproliferative activity of 6 medicinal wood-destroying mushrooms (Fomes fomentarius, Fomitopsis pinicola, Trametes versicolor, Trichaptum biforme, Inonotus obliquus, and Coniophora puteana) that are common in deciduous and mixed coniferous forests in Central Russia. Morphological identification of strains collected from the wild was confirmed based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer phylogenetic analysis. We observed cytotoxic and cell growth-inhibitory effects of hot water extracts from mycelial biomass of 5 species-T. versicolor, C. puteana, F. fomentarius, F. pinicola, and I. obliquus-on leukemia cell lines (Jukart, K562, and THP-1); the effective extract concentrations were mostly less than 50 µg · mL-1. However, we observed no antiproliferative activity of dry biomass from methanol-chloroform (1:1) extracts of C. puteana and F. fomentarius. A chemosensitivity assay showed that the most effective polypore mushroom extract was the methanol extract of T. versicolor (strain It-1), which inhibited the growth of 6 various solid tumors (A-549 and SWi573 [lung], HBL-100 and T-47D [breast], HeLa [cervix], and WiDr [colon]) at concentrations below 45 µg · mL-1, with a concentration as low as 0.7-3.6 µg · mL-1 causing 50% reduction in the proliferation of cancer cells in lung and cervix tumors. Methanol extracts of F. pinicola and I. obliquus were less effective, with proliferation-inhibiting capacities at concentrations below 70 and 200 µg · mL-1, respectively. Thus, T. versicolor is a prospective candidate in the search for and production of new antiproliferative chemical compounds.
PubMed ID
29604909 View in PubMed
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Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264820
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Dec 16;48(24):14203-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-2014
Author
Michelle M Nearing
Iris Koch
Kenneth J Reimer
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Dec 16;48(24):14203-10
Date
Dec-16-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry - metabolism
Arsenic - chemistry - metabolism
Arsenicals - chemistry - metabolism
British Columbia
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Food contamination - analysis
Mass Spectrometry
Northwest Territories
Ontario
X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy
Abstract
The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered.
PubMed ID
25417842 View in PubMed
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Decision making framework for application of forest countermeasures in the long term after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174919
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;82(2):143-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
S V Fesenko
G. Voigt
S I Spiridonov
I A Gontarenko
Author Affiliation
International Atomic Energy Agency, Agency's Laboratories Seibersdorf, 1400 Vienna, Austria. s.fesenko@iaea.org
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;82(2):143-66
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Animals
Cesium radioisotopes
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Conservation of Natural Resources
Decision Making
Decision Support Techniques
Forestry
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Hazard Release
Radioactive Pollutants
Russia
Wood
Abstract
After the ChNPP accident a very large part of the territories covered by natural and artificial forests are contaminated with long-lived radionuclides, especially 137Cs. To protect people against exposure associated with forest contamination in the most affected regions of the NIS countries, countermeasures have been developed and recommended for the forest management. The paper presents a decision making framework to optimise forest countermeasures in the long term after the ChNPP accident. The approach presented is based on the analysis of the main exposure pathways and application of radiological, socio-economical and ecological criteria for the selection of optimal countermeasures strategies. Because of the diversity of these criteria modern decision support technologies based on multi-attributive analysis were applied. The results of the application of this approach are presented in a selected study area (Novozybkov district, Bryansk region, Russian Federation). The results prove and emphasize the need for a flexible technique to provide the optimised forest countermeasures taking into account radioecological, social and economic features of contaminated forests.
PubMed ID
15878415 View in PubMed
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Free amino acids and 5'-nucleotides in Finnish forest mushrooms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294695
Source
Food Chem. 2018 May 01; 247:23-28
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-01-2018
Author
Hanna Manninen
Minna Rotola-Pukkila
Heikki Aisala
Anu Hopia
Timo Laaksonen
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: hanna.manninen@tut.fi.
Source
Food Chem. 2018 May 01; 247:23-28
Date
May-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Amino Acids - analysis
Basidiomycota - chemistry
Chromatography, Liquid
Finland
Food analysis
Forests
Glutamic Acid - analysis
Nucleosides - analysis
Nucleotides - analysis
Taste
Abstract
Edible mushrooms are valued because of their umami taste and good nutritional values. Free amino acids, 5'-nucleotides and nucleosides were analyzed from four Nordic forest mushroom species (Lactarius camphoratus, Boletus edulis, Cantharellus cibarius, Craterellus tubaeformis) using high precision liquid chromatography analysis. To our knowledge, these taste components were studied for the first time from Craterellus tubaeformis and Lactarius camphoratus. The focus was on the umami amino acids and 5'-nucleotides. The free amino acid and 5'-nucleotide/nucleoside contents of studied species differed from each other. In all studied samples, umami amino acids were among five major free amino acids. The highest concentration of umami amino acids was on L. camphoratus whereas B. edulis had the highest content of sweet amino acids and C. cibarius had the highest content of bitter amino acids. The content of umami enhancing 5'-nucleotides were low in all studied species.
PubMed ID
29277224 View in PubMed
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Long-term stability of decontamination effect in recreational areas near the town Novozybkov, Bryansk Region, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173374
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2006;85(2-3):280-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
V. Ramzaev
K G Andersson
A. Barkovsky
C L Fogh
A. Mishine
J. Roed
Author Affiliation
St.-Petersburg Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Mira Street 8, 197101 St.-Petersburg, Russia. v.ramzaev@mail.ru
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2006;85(2-3):280-98
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Construction Materials
Decontamination
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Housing
Humans
Poaceae - chemistry
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive fallout
Radioactive Hazard Release
Recreation
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Trees
Abstract
In 1995 and 1997, experimental decontamination campaigns were carried out in two recreational areas, Novie Bobovichi and Guta-Muravinka, near the town of Novozybkov, Bryansk Region, Russia. These areas were strongly affected by the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. In order to examine the long-term stability of the clean-up procedures, a programme has been carried out to continuously monitor the radiological situation in and around the decontaminated areas. This follow-up program consists of regular (1-3 times per year) measurements of absorbed gamma-dose rate in air (DR) at reference indoor and outdoor locations, repeated DR measurements on a grid, and gamma-spectrometric analysis of soil and other environmental samples. Very similar dynamics of the Chernobyl-related DR, mostly attributed to radiocaesium decay, were found in all the locations. For the period under study (September 1995-May 2003), the half-lives (years) for the reduction in radiocaesium-dependent DR contribution due to contaminant migration (in the following termed 'DRM half-lives') were, respectively, 52+/-26, 57+/-23, 43+/-21, 46+/-15, and 80+/-56 for the following locations: untreated outdoors, treated outdoors, untreated indoors, treated indoors, and undisturbed forest-grassland plots outside the recreational areas. These relatively high values of the current DRM half-lives correspond very well with the results of soil core analyses, which showed no time-dependent changes in the mean mass depths of the (137)Cs distribution, neither at treated nor at undisturbed plots. The following signs of natural restoration of the disturbed forest-meadow ecosystems have been observed at treated areas: formation of a new litter layer, development of grassy spots, mushroom growths and new generations of pines and birches. The levels of the (137)Cs content in grass and mushrooms from treated plots were one or two orders of magnitude lower, than those registered in the samples from untreated areas. The follow-up study demonstrates the long-term stability and efficiency of the decontamination carried out. There are two main reasons for the sustainment of the effects: careful implementation of adequate clean-up procedures and natural strong fixation of radiocaesium in soil-associated matrices of the ecosystems.
PubMed ID
16095772 View in PubMed
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Low-temperature-induced changes in trehalose, mannitol and arabitol associated with enhanced tolerance to freezing in ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes (Hebeloma spp.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9888
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2002 Oct;12(5):249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
M. Tibbett
F E Sanders
J W G Cairney
Author Affiliation
School of Biology, University of Leeds, UK. mark.tibbett@csiro.au
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2002 Oct;12(5):249-55
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry - physiology
Biomass
Freezing
Mannitol - analysis - metabolism
Mycelium - chemistry
Mycorrhizae - chemistry - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soil
Sugar Alcohols - analysis - metabolism
Temperature
Trehalose - analysis - physiology
Abstract
Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been shown to survive sub-zero temperatures in axenic culture and in the field. However, the physiological basis for resistance to freezing is poorly understood. In order to survive freezing, mycelia must synthesise compounds that protect the cells from frost damage, and certain fungal-specific soluble carbohydrates have been implicated in this role. Tissue concentrations of arabitol, mannitol and trehalose were measured in axenic cultures of eight Hebeloma strains of arctic and temperate origin grown at 22, 12, 6 and 2 degrees C. In a separate experiment, mycelia were frozen to -5 degrees C after pre-conditioning at either 2 degrees C or 22 degrees C. For some, especially temperate strains, there was a clear increase in specific soluble carbohydrates at lower growth temperatures. Trehalose and mannitol were present in all strains and the highest concentrations (close to 2.5% and 0.5% dry wt.) were recorded only after a cold period. Arabitol was found in four strains only when grown at low temperature. Cold pre-conditioning enhanced recovery of mycelia following freezing. In four out of eight strains, this was paralleled by increases in mannitol and trehalose concentration at low temperature that presumably contribute towards cryoprotection. The results are discussed in an ecological context with regard to mycelial overwintering in soil.
PubMed ID
12375136 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.