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Abdominal pain is a common and recurring problem in paediatric emergency departments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310646
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2019 10; 108(10):1905-1910
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2019
Author
María Björg Magnúsdóttir
Viðar Róbertsson
Sigurður Þorgrímsson
Þráinn Rósmundsson
Úlfur Agnarsson
Ásgeir Haraldsson
Author Affiliation
The Children's Hospital Iceland, Landspítali - University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2019 10; 108(10):1905-1910
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - epidemiology
Adolescent
Aftercare - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Male
Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Abdominal pain is a frequent reason for paediatric emergency department visits, but specific research is lacking. Our aim was to obtain information on the diagnosis of abdominal pain and what healthcare services children with this condition need.
This retrospective study focused on patients visiting the emergency department of the Children's Hospital Iceland in 2010 with abdominal pain and any subsequent visits up to 1 January 2015.
There were 11 340 visits to the emergency department in 2010 and 1118 children made 1414 (12%) visits due to abdominal pain. The majority (58%) with abdominal pain were girls (p 
PubMed ID
30883887 View in PubMed
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Acute poisoning among children and adolescents in southern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309836
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2019 Sep 24; 139(13):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-24-2019
Author
Elisabeth Tallaksen Ulseth
Anne Freuchen
Unni Mette Stamnes Köpp
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2019 Sep 24; 139(13):
Date
Sep-24-2019
Language
Norwegian
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Aftercare
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Child
Child Guidance
Child, Preschool
Designer Drugs - poisoning
Female
Humans
Illicit Drugs - poisoning
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Poisoning - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Residence Characteristics
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicidal ideation
Abstract
Self-inflicted poisoning is common in adolescents and is a risk factor for suicide. The aim of this study was to survey the circumstances surrounding hospitalisations due to acute poisoning in patients aged up to 18 years.
All hospitalisations in the Departments of Paediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Sørlandet Hospital Trust (Arendal and Kristiansand) due to acute poisoning in the period 1 August 2014-31 July 2015 were prospectively recorded with the aid of a form completed during the admission.
There were 88 hospitalisations distributed among 68 adolescents (mean age 15.5 years, SD 1.5) and 13 children (mean age 2.8 years, SD 2.8). The poisoning was categorised as self-harm behaviour in 32 (47 %) of the adolescents, and as substance misuse-related in 35 (52 %). In total, 37 (54 %) of the adolescents had been or were under treatment at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Fifteen (22 %) of the adolescents were deemed to be suicidal. Thirty (94 %) of the adolescents who reported self-harm as the intention behind their poisoning were offered further follow-up at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, along with 7 (20 %) of the group with substance misuse-related poisoning.
Adolescents who reported self-harm as their intention were usually offered further follow-up, whereas adolescents with substance misuse-related poisoning were rarely offered follow-up.
PubMed ID
31556525 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of wives to prostate cancer following diagnosis and 3 months after treatment: a test of family adaptation theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168110
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):827-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Hélène Ezer
Nicole Ricard
Louise Bouchard
Luis Souhami
Fred Saad
Armen Aprikian
Yoshi Taguchi
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 2A7. helene.ezer@mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):827-38
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aftercare - psychology
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Erectile Dysfunction - etiology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Prospective Studies
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Psychological Theory
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Urination Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Prostate cancer challenges not only the men with the disease, but also their partners. Existing studies have focused on the relationship between type of treatment and sexual and urinary function in men, with recent qualitative work suggesting that men and their spouses have differing responses to the illness. Factors predicting women's adaptation to prostate cancer have not been examined.
Using a model derived from family stress and adaptation theory, this study examined (1) the contribution of urinary and sexual symptoms, sense of coherence, marital resources and situational appraisal to wives' global adaptation (PAIS) and emotional adaptation (POMS), and (2) the role of situational appraisal as a mediator between the set of independent variables and PAIS and POMS.
In a prospective, correlational design, data were collected from 70 women following their partners' diagnosis and again 3 months later.
Using a path analysis approach, between 30% and 62.7% of the variance in global adjustment and mood disturbance was explained across model tests. Sense of coherence was a strong and consistent predictor. Appraisal acted as a mediator only at time 2, mediating the effect of symptom distress on global adaptation. Change in sense of coherence and change in family resources predicted global adaptation and emotional adaptation at time 2, and predicted the change between time 1 and 2 in those variables.
The findings suggest nursing interventions that mobilize and build wives' sense of the manageability, meaningfulness and comprehensibility of life events, and that foster cohesion and flexibility within the marital relationship. Interventions that mitigate the impact of urinary symptoms and the appraisal of threat in the illness event are also indicated. Additional model-testing studies based on family adaptation theory with patients and family members in other types of cancer would help build nursing knowledge for interventions in cancer.
PubMed ID
16876802 View in PubMed
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Addressing postdischarge adverse events: a neglected area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158206
Source
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2008 Feb;34(2):85-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Dennis Tsilimingras
David Westfall Bates
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, USA. dtsilimingras@yahoo.com
Source
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2008 Feb;34(2):85-97
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare
Canada
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Internal Medicine
Patient Discharge
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Safety Management
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Postdischarge safety is an area that has long been neglected. Recent studies from the United States and Canada found that about one in five patients discharged home from the general internal medicine services of major teaching hospitals suffered an adverse event.
MEDLINE, Cochrane databases, and reference lists of retrieved articles were used in a literature search of articles published from 1966 through May 2007.
Patient safety research has focused mostly on adverse events in hospitalized patients. Although some data are available about the ambulatory setting, even fewer studies have been done focusing on adverse events following hospital discharge. Only two studies conducted in North America have examined the incidence rate of all types of postdischarge adverse events. On the basis of the available evidence, key areas of opportunity to improve postdischarge care are as follows: (1) improving transitional care, (2) improving information transfer through strategic use of electronic health records, (3) medication reconciliation, (4) improving follow-up of test results, and (5) using screening methods to identify patients with adverse events.
Limited evidence suggests that about one in five internal medicine patients suffers an adverse event after discharge from a North American hospital. The risk of postdischarge adverse events should be recognized by patient safety experts as an important area of concern.
PubMed ID
18351193 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with anorexia nervosa: multiple perspectives of discharge readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173064
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri L Turrell
Ron Davis
Heather Graham
Iris Weiss
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sturrell@nygh.on.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Aftercare
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
Little is known about the conditions that must be in place to help adolescent patients and their families gain the confidence needed to continue recovery at home, following the adolescents' hospitalization for anorexia nervosa.
Beliefs about discharge readiness were obtained through an open-ended questionnaire following the patients' first weekend pass home from an in-patient unit. The perceptions of patients, parents, and registered nurses were obtained using parallel versions of a questionnaire.
An examination of the responses revealed four themes; medical stability, education, psychological changes, and community resource planning, that were common to all respondents, as well as themes specific to adolescents and to nurses.
The findings suggest that each group of respondents has unique discharge readiness needs and that registered nurses have an important role to play in helping patients and families make the transition home as successful as possible. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.
PubMed ID
16137269 View in PubMed
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[After-care department with out-patient facilities and day and night hospital in a mental hospital. Experiences from the year 1971].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254435
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1973 Aug 30;93(24):1656-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1973

Aftercare, emergency department visits, and readmission in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126698
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Mar;51(3):283-293.e4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Corine E Carlisle
Muhammad Mamdani
Russell Schachar
Teresa To
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. corine.carlisle@sickkids.ca
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Mar;51(3):283-293.e4
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aftercare - methods - psychology - standards
Canada
Confidence Intervals
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Young Adult
Abstract
U.S. and Canadian data demonstrate decreasing inpatient days, increasing nonurgent emergency department (ED) visits, and short supply of child psychiatrists. Our study aims to determine whether aftercare reduces ED visits and/or readmission in adolescents with first psychiatric hospitalization.
We conducted a population-based cohort analysis using linked health administrative databases with accrual from April 1, 2002, to March 1, 2004. The study cohort included all 15- to 19-year-old adolescents with first psychiatric admission. Adolescents with and without aftercare in the month post-discharge were matched on their propensity to receive aftercare. Our primary outcome was time to first psychiatric ED visit or readmission. Secondary outcomes were time to first psychiatric ED visit and readmission, separately.
We identified 4,472 adolescents with first-time psychiatric admission. Of these, 57% had aftercare in the month post-discharge. Propensity-score-based matching, which accounted for each individual's propensity for aftercare, produced a cohort of 3,004 adolescents. In matched analyses, relative to those with no aftercare in the month post-discharge, those with aftercare had increased likelihood of combined outcome (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.42), and readmission (HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.14-1.66), but not ED visits (HR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.95-1.37).
Our results are provocative: we found that aftercare in the month post-discharge increased the likelihood of readmission but not ED visit. Over and above confounding by severity and Canadian/U.S. systems differences, our results may indicate a relative lack of psychiatric services for youth. Our results point to the need for improved data capture of pediatric mental health service use.
PubMed ID
22365464 View in PubMed
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[Aftercare of malleolar fractures in Denmark. A questionnaire study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198465
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 May 8;162(19):2747-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-8-2000
Author
K. Hviid
K. Harager
K. Schantz
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 May 8;162(19):2747-50
Date
May-8-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare - methods
Ankle Injuries - rehabilitation - surgery - therapy
Bandages
Denmark
Fracture Fixation - methods
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Abstract
A questionnaire was sent out to 59 orthopaedic departments. Seventy-eight percent returned the questionnaire. Four thousand two hundred ankle fractures are treated annually. Fifty percent are operated on (range 12.5-83%). Large departments are on average more surgically active than smaller ones. The noticeable difference, however, in surgical frequency is not connected to size, function or location of orthopaedic department. All fractures are usually immobilized with a circular plaster bandage. Thirty percent use dynamic bandages for some stable ankle fractures. Eighty-five percent bandage for six weeks, 15% for up to eight weeks. Very few allow early mobilization of surgically treated fractures (6%). The rest do not allow mobilization until at least three weeks after surgery. Stable fractures are more frequently permitted immediate mobilization. Several randomized studies recommend that all ankle fractures should be mobilized immediately, surgically treated in a circular plaster bandage, stable fractures in dynamic bandages.
PubMed ID
10827543 View in PubMed
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[Aftercare of newborn infants in a patient hotel]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58759
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 May 10;120(12):1409-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2000
Author
C. Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Barneintensiv avdeling, Kvinne-barn klinikken, Barnesentret Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 May 10;120(12):1409-11
Date
May-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Infant care
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay
Maternal Welfare
Maternal-Child Nursing
Norway
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Postnatal Care
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Safety
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Postnatal care of the healthy term newborn and the mother has, in modern times, taken place in the hospital setting. As a result of tightened hospital budgets as well as maternal preferences the duration of hospital stay has successively been shortened. Most women in Scandinavia today leave the hospital within four days after delivery. Postnatal care in a hotel like setting has emerged as an alternative to the well-baby nursery unless medical conditions makes this option inappropriate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: To evaluate the safety of postnatal care a study was undertaken to investigate whether correct criteria were being used for referral of the newborn to the hotel. We also wanted to document the duration of stay, unexpected medical complications, and weight development of the infants. Data from 865 infants were used for analysis. RESULTS: Ten (1.1%) newborns had to be readmitted to the hospital due to medical complications. 488 (56%) of the mothers went home within 96 hours, and only 23 (2.6%) stayed more than 120 hours. The weight of the infants reached a nadir on the fourth day post partum (-5.2% of birth weight). INTERPRETATION: The patient hotel is a medically safe alternative to the traditional well-baby nursery, provided that appropriate criteria for referral are used.
PubMed ID
10851936 View in PubMed
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353 records – page 1 of 36.