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America's Churning Races: Race and Ethnicity Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286886
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Carolyn A Liebler
Sonya R Porter
Leticia E Fernandez
James M Noon
Sharon R Ennis
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Censuses
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
A person's racial or ethnic self-identification can change over time and across contexts, which is a component of population change not usually considered in studies that use race and ethnicity as variables. To facilitate incorporation of this aspect of population change, we show patterns and directions of individual-level race and Hispanic response change throughout the United States and among all federally recognized race/ethnic groups. We use internal U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses in which responses have been linked at the individual level (N = 162 million). Approximately 9.8 million people (6.1 %) in our data have a different race and/or Hispanic-origin response in 2010 than they did in 2000. Race response change was especially common among those reported as American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander, in a multiple-race response group, or Hispanic. People reported as non-Hispanic white, black, or Asian in 2000 usually had the same response in 2010 (3 %, 6 %, and 9 % of responses changed, respectively). Hispanic/non-Hispanic ethnicity responses were also usually consistent (13 % and 1 %, respectively, changed). We found a variety of response change patterns, which we detail. In many race/Hispanic response groups, we see population churn in the form of large countervailing flows of response changes that are hidden in cross-sectional data. We find that response changes happen across ages, sexes, regions, and response modes, with interesting variation across racial/ethnic categories. Researchers should address the implications of race and Hispanic-origin response change when designing analyses and interpreting results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28105578 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity and eczema prevalence, severity and poorer health in US adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261341
Source
Dermatitis. 2014 Jul-Aug;25(4):172-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jonathan I Silverberg
Eric L Simpson
Source
Dermatitis. 2014 Jul-Aug;25(4):172-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Body mass index
Child
Eczema - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health status
Health Surveys
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of eczema is of major public health significance.
This study aimed to determine the effects of obesity in adolescence on the prevalence, severity, and quality of life of patients with eczema.
We used the 2007-2008 National Survey of Children's Health, including a nationally representative sample of 45,897 adolescents aged 10 to 17 years. Caregiver report of eczema, health status, height, weight, number of health conditions, use of health services, and sociodemographics were assessed.
The prevalences of overweight (20.3% vs 15.4%) and obesity (16.8% vs 15.4%) were increased in adolescents with eczema compared with adolescents without eczema (Rao-Scott ?, P
PubMed ID
25000233 View in PubMed
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Baseline selenium status and effects of selenium and vitamin e supplementation on prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104917
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Alan R Kristal
Amy K Darke
J Steven Morris
Catherine M Tangen
Phyllis J Goodman
Ian M Thompson
Frank L Meyskens
Gary E Goodman
Lori M Minasian
Howard L Parnes
Scott M Lippman
Eric A Klein
Author Affiliation
Affiliations of authors: Cancer Prevention Program (ARK) and SWOG Statistical Center (AKD, CMT, PJG), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; Department of Epidemiology (ARK, GEG) and Department of Environmental Health (GEG), University of Washington, Seattle, WA; University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, Columbia, MO (JSM); Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO (JSM); Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (IMT); Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (FLM); Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (LMM, HLP); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA (SML); Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (EAK).
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nails - chemistry
Neoplasm Grading
Odds Ratio
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Puerto Rico - epidemiology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk
Selenium - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Trace Elements - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Vitamins - adverse effects
Abstract
The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial found no effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer (PCa) risk but a 17% increased risk from vitamin E supplementation. This case-cohort study investigates effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation conditional upon baseline selenium status.
There were 1739 total and 489 high-grade (Gleason 7-10) PCa cases and 3117 men in the randomly selected cohort. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for effects of supplementation within quintiles of baseline toenail selenium. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios, and all statistical tests are two-sided.
Toenail selenium, in the absence of supplementation, was not associated with PCa risk. Selenium supplementation (combined selenium only and selenium + vitamin E arms) had no effect among men with low selenium status (
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):dju00524563520
Comment In: Nat Rev Urol. 2014 Apr;11(4):18424619375
PubMed ID
24563519 View in PubMed
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Birth cohort and calendar period trends in breast cancer mortality in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209310
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Feb 5;89(3):251-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-1997
Author
R E Tarone
K C Chu
L A Gaudette
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Feb 5;89(3):251-6
Date
Feb-5-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - mortality
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fertility
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies of regional and temporal variation in U.S. breast cancer mortality rates have been confined largely to analyses of rates for white women.
Breast cancer mortality rates from 1969 through 1992 for white women and black women in four regions of the United States and for all women throughout Canada were compared to identify racial, regional, and temporal differences. Differences and trends in the rates were evaluated in view of breast cancer risk factors and relevant medical interventions.
Age-period-cohort models were fit to the data, and changes in birth cohort trends (suggesting a change in a breast cancer risk factor or protective factor) and calendar period trends (suggesting, in part, the impact of new or improved medical interventions) were examined.
Breast cancer mortality rates for white women were significantly higher in the Northeast than in any other region of the United States (two-sided t tests; P
PubMed ID
9017006 View in PubMed
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Birth outcomes among American Indian/Alaska Native women with diabetes in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3116
Source
J Reprod Med. 2003 Aug;48(8):610-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Donna L LaVallie
Steven G Gabbe
David C Grossman
Eric B Larson
Laura-Mae Baldwin
C Holly A Andrilla
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pediatrics and Family Medicine, University of Washington, Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative/Permanente, Seattle, Washington, USA. d12@u.washington.edu
Source
J Reprod Med. 2003 Aug;48(8):610-6
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Alaska - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Diabetes, Gestational - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Maternal Behavior - ethnology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - ethnology
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe perinatal outcomes and maternal characteristics among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women with diabetes in pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective analysis of live births to AI/AN, African American and white women with diabetes (242,715) during pregnancy for the 1989-1991 period (latest available at the time of study) was conducted utilizing a linked birth/infant death database from the National Center for Health Statistics. AI/AN perinatal outcomes and maternal characteristics were compared to those of African American and white women. Similar analyses compared urban and rural AI/AN populations. RESULTS: AI/AN women were more likely than white women to receive inadequate prenatal care (10.4%), to have higher rates of pregnancy-induced hypertension (9.1%) and to have significantly lower rates of primary cesarean delivery (16.9% vs. 22.3%). The rate of macrosomia among births to AI/AN women (24.2%) was notably higher as compared to that in the white population (17.9%). Rates of musculoskeletal and chromosomal anomalies were also higher among AI/AN women, 9 and 4, respectively, per 1,000 live births, as compared to 6 and 2 per 1,000 for the white population. CONCLUSION: Multiple maternal risk factors and birth outcomes demonstrate the need for further research to evaluate methods of improving care in this population.
PubMed ID
12971141 View in PubMed
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Building cultural competency for improved diabetes care: Introduction and Overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94059
Source
J Fam Pract. 2007 Sep;56(9 Suppl Building):S11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Hsu William C
Yoon Henry H
Gavin James R
Wright Eugene Edward
Cabellero A Enrique
Tenzer Penny
Author Affiliation
Harvard Medical School; Director, Asian Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA USA.
Source
J Fam Pract. 2007 Sep;56(9 Suppl Building):S11-4
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Cultural Competency - education
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Family Practice - education
Health Services Accessibility
Hemoglobin A - metabolism
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Monitoring, Physiologic
Physicians, Family - education
Problem-Based Learning
Professional-Patient Relations
United States
Abstract
Diabetes affects about 7% of the US population with more than 90% of cases being type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 2005, this translated into nearly 21 million Americans with diabetes. Whereas Americans from all ethnic and cultural groups are affected, minority populations are disproportionately affected. In fact, diabetes prevalence is 2 to 6 times higher among Latino Americans, African Americans, Native Americans (American Indians and Native Alaskans), and Asian Americans than among white Americans. The National Institutes of Health reports that American Indians and Native Alaskans are 2.2 times more likely to have the disease than are non-Hispanic whites. Furthermore, studies using glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) as a marker have shown that Latino Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans have poorer control of their diabetes. In a study by Brown and colleagues, mean A1C levels were higher among Latino Americans, African Americans, and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders than among white Americans.
PubMed ID
18667134 View in PubMed
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Chlamydia positivity in women screened in family planning clinics: racial/ethnic differences and trends in the northwest U.S., 1997-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127390
Source
Public Health Rep. 2012 Jan-Feb;127(1):38-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
David Fine
Katherine K Thomas
Wendy Nakatsukasa-Ono
Jeanne Marrazzo
Author Affiliation
Cardea Services, 1809 Seventh Ave., Ste. 600, Seattle, WA 98101-1313, USA. dfine@cardeaservices.org
Source
Public Health Rep. 2012 Jan-Feb;127(1):38-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - ethnology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Ethnic Groups
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Family Planning Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Northwestern United States - epidemiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We assessed chlamydia trends, individual-level risk factors, and population-level area-based socioeconomic measures (ABSMs) associated with chlamydia infection in women attending U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) Region X Infertility Prevention Project (IPP) family planning (FP) clinics from 1997-2006. We then explored these measures within racial/ethnic subpopulations.
Using data from 667,223 chlamydia tests obtained from women aged 15-24 years screened in 201 FP clinics, we employed a generalized mixed model with logistic link, incorporating clinic and ZIP code as random effects to adjust for risk of chlamydia associated with individual- and population-level (areal) measures for the overall population and for each racial/ethnic subpopulation.
Significant racial/ethnic differences in chlamydia persisted after adjusting for individual and aggregate factors. Relatively steep chlamydia gradients were found across racial/ethnic ABSM levels. Compared with white women, infection risk was significantly higher for black (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.93), American Indian/Alaska Native (AOR=1.62), Asian/Pacific Islander (AOR=1.42), and Hispanic (AOR=1.28) women. The impact of population-level ABSMs on chlamydia varied across racial/ethnic groups and was generally modest. Among white women, there was a significant 4% relative annual increase in predicted chlamydia during the 10-year period 1997-2006. Chlamydia positivity over time did not change for racial/ethnic minority groups after adjusting for individual- and population-level factors.
Racial/ethnic differences in chlamydia persisted over time and were not mitigated by adjustment for aggregate socioeconomic position or areal racial/ethnic measures. Changes in project strategies will be needed to address racial/ethnic disparities for chlamydial infection among young female FP clinic clients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22298921 View in PubMed
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Colopharyngoplasty for intractable caustic pharyngoesophageal strictures in an indigenous African community--adverse impact of concomitant tracheostomy on outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139566
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2011 Feb;12(2):213-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Mark Tettey
Frank Edwin
Ernest Aniteye
Martin Tamatey
Kow Entsua-Mensah
Ernest Ofosu-Appiah
Kwabena Frimpong-Boateng
Author Affiliation
National Cardiothoracic Centre, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Box KB 846 Korle Bu, Accra. Ghana. mawut@mail.com
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2011 Feb;12(2):213-7
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Burns, Chemical - etiology - surgery
Caustics - toxicity
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Colon - transplantation
Esophageal Stenosis - chemically induced - ethnology - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pharyngeal Diseases - chemically induced - surgery
Pharynx - injuries - surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Tracheostomy - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Surgical management of caustic strictures of the upper digestive tract poses difficult challenges. This is because reconstruction above the cricopharyngeal junction interferes with the mechanisms of swallowing and respiration. This report reviews the outcome of colopharyngeal reconstruction of severe diffuse pharyngoesophageal caustic strictures in an indigenous African community.
The medical records of patients who underwent colopharyngoplasty from January 2006 to December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed to obtain information on patients' demographics, surgical technique and outcome.
In the study period, 20 patients underwent reconstruction for caustic esophageal strictures; in five (three males, two females) colopharyngoplasty was required. Their ages ranged from four to 56 years (mean 25 years). Follow-up ranged from 23 to 94 months (mean 33 months). Colopharyngoplasty using left colon tunneled retrosternally was performed in all patients. Rehabilitative training for deglutition was required for 0.5-5.0 months postoperatively to restore near-normal swallowing in all patients. However, tracheostomy complications caused two deaths (one early, one late) and varicella encephalitis caused another late death.
In this African community, colopharyngoplasty provided an effective mean of restoration of upper digestive tract continuity in patients with severe caustic pharyngoesophageal strictures. Tracheostomy in this setting portends a significant long-term mortality risk.
PubMed ID
21047823 View in PubMed
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Comparing racial and immigrant health status and health care access in later life in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141360
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Sep;29(3):383-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Steven G Prus
Rania Tfaily
Zhiqiu Lin
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. steven_prus@carleton.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Sep;29(3):383-95
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Medically Uninsured - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Universal Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Little comparative research exists on health experiences and conditions of minority groups in Canada and the United States, despite both countries having a racially diverse population with a significant proportion of immigrants. This article explores race and immigrant disparities in health and health care access across the two countries. The study focus was on middle and old age given the change and increasing diversity in health and health care policy, such as Medicare. Logistic regression analysis of data from the 2002-2003 Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health shows that the joint effect of race and nativity on health outcomes - health differences between native and foreign-born Whites and non-Whites - is largely insignificant in Canada but considerable in the U.S. Non-White native and foreign-born Americans within both 45-to-64 and 65-and-over age groups experience significant disadvantage in health status and access to care, irrespective of health insurance coverage, demographic, socio-economic, and lifestyle factors.
PubMed ID
20731891 View in PubMed
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Defining constant versus variable phenotypic features of women with polycystic ovary syndrome using different ethnic groups and populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80900
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Nov;91(11):4361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Welt C K
Arason G.
Gudmundsson J A
Adams J.
Palsdóttir H.
Gudlaugsdóttir G.
Ingadóttir G.
Crowley W F
Author Affiliation
Reproductive Endocrine, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. cwelt@partners.org
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Nov;91(11):4361-8
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Body mass index
Boston - epidemiology - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology - ethnology
Insulin - blood
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Ovary - anatomy & histology
Phenotype
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Population
Reproduction - physiology
Sex Differentiation Disorders - blood
Waist-Hip Ratio - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
CONTEXT: The phenotype of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is variable, depending on the ethnic background. OBJECTIVE: The phenotypes of women with PCOS in Iceland and Boston were compared. DESIGN: The study was observational with a parallel design. SETTING: Subjects were studied in an outpatient setting. PATIENTS: Women, aged 18-45 yr, with PCOS defined by hyperandrogenism and fewer than nine menses per year, were examined in Iceland (n = 105) and Boston (n = 262). INTERVENTION: PCOS subjects underwent a physical exam, fasting blood samples for androgens, gonadotropins, metabolic parameters, and a transvaginal ultrasound. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The phenotype of women with PCOS was compared between Caucasian women in Iceland and Boston and among Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian women in Boston. RESULTS: Androstenedione (4.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.2 ng/ml; P
PubMed ID
16940441 View in PubMed
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72 records – page 1 of 8.