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Engaging with healthy eating discourse(s): ways of knowing about food and health in three ethnocultural groups in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161750
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jan;50(1):167-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Svetlana Ristovski-Slijepcevic
Gwen E Chapman
Brenda L Beagan
Author Affiliation
Food, Nutrition and Health, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2205 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T-1Z4. svetlana@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jan;50(1):167-78
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
British Columbia
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Female
Food
Health
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Abstract
The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of how people make sense of healthy eating discourses by exploring the 'ways of knowing' about healthy eating among members of three different ethnocultural groups in Canada: African Nova Scotians, Punjabi British Columbians and Canadian-born European Nova Scotians and British Columbians. Data for this paper come from in-depth, individual interviews with 105 adults where they described their experiences, interpretations, and reasoning used in learning and deciding what to believe and/or reject about healthy eating. Between and within ethnocultural group differences in how people come to know and use practices about healthy eating were examined as they were represented through three broad healthy eating discourses: cultural/traditional, mainstream and complementary/ethical. The discourses represented different ways to interpret the food-health relationship and make sense of the evidence about healthy eating in the everyday experience. Engagement with different discourses led participants to undertake different practices upon themselves in the name of healthy eating. We suggest that each of the discourses has a significant contribution to make in a dialogue about how healthy eating, as part of health and well-being, should be conceptualized by a society.
PubMed ID
17716781 View in PubMed
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HIV prevention for Black women: structural barriers and opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155856
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Peter A Newman
Charmaine C Williams
Notisha Massaquoi
Marsha Brown
Carmen Logie
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1. p.newman@utoronto.ca
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - ethnology
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Demography
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prejudice
Primary Prevention - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Taboo
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - utilization
Abstract
Black women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in North America. The purpose of this investigation was to explore Black Canadian women's perspectives on HIV risk and prevention. Four 90-minute focus groups (n=26) and six key informant interviews were conducted in Toronto with Black women of African and Caribbean descent and low socioeconomic status. Data analysis revealed a number of potent barriers to existing HIV preventive interventions: stigma, cultural disconnections, lack of engagement of Black religious institutions, and multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. Recommended HIV prevention opportunities included the Black church, mainstreaming, health care providers, and ethno-specific agencies. HIV prevention strategies for North American Black women, rather than focusing on HIV and individual risk behaviors, may benefit from a primary focus on social and structural factors (e.g., promoting gender equality, economic opportunity, women-controlled prevention technologies and combating racism in health care) thereby integrating HIV prevention into the larger context of community health and survival.
PubMed ID
18677073 View in PubMed
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HIV prevention risks for Black women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154544
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jan;68(1):12-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Charmaine C Williams
Peter A Newman
Izumi Sakamoto
Notisha A Massaquoi
Author Affiliation
Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1. charmaine.williams@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jan;68(1):12-20
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines
Adult
Africa - ethnology
African Continental Ancestry Group - education - psychology
Aged
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Ontario
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Social Environment
Stereotyping
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The future availability of HIV vaccines can increase options available to Canadian Black women for risk reduction. However, current conceptual frameworks do not adequately address barriers to HIV prevention for this population, and may be inadequate to address challenges with vaccines. This study explored knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV vaccines and associated prevention methods to inform appropriate conceptual frameworks for their dissemination to Canadian Black women. We completed four 90-min focus groups with women (n=26) of African or Caribbean origins, and six interviews with key informants providing health and social services in the Black communities of Toronto. The participants suggested that there were significant risks associated with seeking prevention information and attempting to reduce exposure to HIV infection. They described individual, familial, community and institutional domains of risk and predicted the same spectrum of risk for HIV vaccines. Participants advocated for education, empowerment and institutional change to create a supportive environment for vaccines and other HIV prevention methods. They further indicated that preparation for vaccine dissemination will need to prioritize building trust between women of the Black communities and institutions in the research, health and government sectors.
PubMed ID
18952342 View in PubMed
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The MaBwana Black men's study: community and belonging in the lives of African, Caribbean and other Black gay men in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125172
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2012;14(5):549-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Clemon George
Barry A Adam
Stanley E Read
Winston C Husbands
Robert S Remis
Lydia Makoroka
Sean B Rourke
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada. clemon.george@uoit.ca
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2012;14(5):549-62
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Culture
HIV Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Homosexuality, Male - psychology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Ontario - epidemiology - ethnology
Prejudice
Psychometrics
Residence Characteristics
Risk-Taking
Social Environment
Social Perception
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
In Canada, there is a paucity of research aimed at understanding Black gay men and the antecedents to risk factors for HIV. This study is an attempt to move beyond risk factor analysis and explore the role of sexual and ethnic communities in the lives of these men. The study utilized a community-based research and critical race theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight key informants to augment our understanding of Black gay men and to facilitate recruitment of participants. In-depth interviews were done with 24 Black gay men. Our data showed that the construction of community for Black gay men is challenged by their social and cultural environment. However, these men use their resilience to navigate gay social networks. Black gay men expressed a sense of abjuration from both gay and Black communities because of homophobia and racism. It is essential for health and social programmers to understand how Black gay men interact with Black and gay communities and the complexities of their interactions in creating outreach educational, preventive and support services.
PubMed ID
22509909 View in PubMed
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[Shortages in the management of genitally mutilated pregnant women in Swedish health care. Time to shift the focus from women's genitals to their whole being]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63310
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Sep 23;101(39):3003-4, 3006
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-2004
Author
Birgitta Essén
Sara Johnsdotter
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för obstetrik och gynekologi, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. birgitta.essen@obst.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Sep 23;101(39):3003-4, 3006
Date
Sep-23-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa - ethnology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Circumcision, Female - adverse effects - psychology - rehabilitation
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Holistic Health
Humans
Maternal Health Services - standards
Practice Guidelines
Pregnancy
Religion and Medicine
Risk assessment
Somalia - ethnology
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 7;101(41):3193-4; author reply 319415517724
PubMed ID
15493642 View in PubMed
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A study of Swedish midwives' encounters with infibulated African women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63639
Source
Midwifery. 2002 Jun;18(2):113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Catarina Widmark
Carol Tishelman
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Public Health Services, Division of International Health/IHCAR, 286, Karolinkska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Caterina.Widmark@phs.ki.se
Source
Midwifery. 2002 Jun;18(2):113-25
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anecdotes
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Midwifery - standards
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - ethnology - nursing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: to investigate Swedish midwives' perceptions and attitudes towards infibulation and infibulated women, midwives' experiences of providing care for them and the training the midwives describe having received to enable them to care for and deliver infibulated women. DESIGN: a multi-stage sampling procedure was used. Open-ended questionnaires were distributed to midwives in labour wards with the purpose of identifying midwives to contact for interviews and focus group discussions. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: twenty-six midwives from three labour wards and two antenatal clinics situated in two towns in central Sweden participated in eight focus group discussions and three individual interviews. FINDINGS: there were three major themes: (a) emotions and communicational challenges entailed in the care of infibulated women, (b) knowledge and skills needed for caring and (c) the midwives' reliance on the Swedish law when dealing with the dilemmas they face in their interactions with the women and their families. The data indicate communication problems on different levels between midwives and the women and their families. There appear to be few or no guidelines in the units on how to provide good care for infibulated women and little or no co-ordination between antenatal care and the maternity wards. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: the care of infibulated women during pregnancy and childbirth seems to be a marginalised issue in the areas where this study was performed. Early acknowledgement of female genital mutilation during pregnancy as well as improved communication between health care units may help professionals to offer culturally sensitive professional care to the women and their families.
PubMed ID
12139909 View in PubMed
Less detail

Swedish health care providers' experience and knowledge of female genital cutting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81177
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2006 Sep;27(8):709-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Tamaddon Leila
Johnsdotter Sara
Liljestrand Jerker
Essén Birgitta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences/Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital UMAS, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2006 Sep;27(8):709-22
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa - ethnology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
We sought to evaluate the experiences and knowledge of health care providers in Sweden regarding female genital cutting (FGC) as a health issue. Questionnaires (n = 2,707) were sent to providers in four major cities in Sweden and evaluated by means of descriptive statistics. Twenty-eight percent (n = 769/2,707) responded, of whom 60% had seen such patients. Seven providers, including 2 pediatricians, were suspicious of patients with signs of recent genital cutting. Ten percent had been asked to perform reinfibulation after delivery. Thirty-eight providers had received inquiries about the possibility of performing FGC in Sweden.A majority of Swedish health care providers meet patients presenting with evidence of FGC performed long ago. However, very few of them have suspected recently cut patients. The results support the hypothesis that this practice is not as active among African immigrants in Sweden as in their countries of origin. If the prevalence was the same as in African countries, more pediatricians would be expected to meet current cut girls. National efforts and policy programs to prevent FGC in Sweden are recommended as effective, in accordance with current research and should especially be directed toward pediatricians.
PubMed ID
16893807 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.