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The encounters that rupture the myth: contradictions in midwives' descriptions and explanations of circumcised women immigrants' sexuality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51957
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Amy Leval
Catarina Widmark
Carol Tishelman
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anecdotes
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Midwifery - standards
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to analyze how Swedish midwives (n = 26) discuss sexuality in circumcised African women patients. In focus groups and interviews, discussions concentrated on care provided to circumcised women, training received for this care, and midwives' perceptions of female circumcision. An analytic expansion was performed for discussions pertaining to sexuality and gender roles. Results from the analysis show the following: (1) ethnocentric projections of sexuality; (2) a knowledge paradox regarding circumcision and sexuality; (3) the view of the powerless circumcised women; and (4) the fact that maternity wards function as meeting places between gender and culture where the encounters with men allow masculine hegemonic norms to be ruptured. We conclude that an increased understanding of cultural epistemology is needed to ensure quality care. The encounters that take place in obstetrical care situations can provide a space where gender and culture as prescribed norms can be questioned.
PubMed ID
15371079 View in PubMed
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HIV prevention for Black women: structural barriers and opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155856
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Peter A Newman
Charmaine C Williams
Notisha Massaquoi
Marsha Brown
Carmen Logie
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1. p.newman@utoronto.ca
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 Aug;19(3):829-41
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa - ethnology
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Demography
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Prejudice
Primary Prevention - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Taboo
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - utilization
Abstract
Black women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in North America. The purpose of this investigation was to explore Black Canadian women's perspectives on HIV risk and prevention. Four 90-minute focus groups (n=26) and six key informant interviews were conducted in Toronto with Black women of African and Caribbean descent and low socioeconomic status. Data analysis revealed a number of potent barriers to existing HIV preventive interventions: stigma, cultural disconnections, lack of engagement of Black religious institutions, and multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. Recommended HIV prevention opportunities included the Black church, mainstreaming, health care providers, and ethno-specific agencies. HIV prevention strategies for North American Black women, rather than focusing on HIV and individual risk behaviors, may benefit from a primary focus on social and structural factors (e.g., promoting gender equality, economic opportunity, women-controlled prevention technologies and combating racism in health care) thereby integrating HIV prevention into the larger context of community health and survival.
PubMed ID
18677073 View in PubMed
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HIV prevention risks for Black women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154544
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jan;68(1):12-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Charmaine C Williams
Peter A Newman
Izumi Sakamoto
Notisha A Massaquoi
Author Affiliation
Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 1A1. charmaine.williams@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jan;68(1):12-20
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines
Adult
Africa - ethnology
African Continental Ancestry Group - education - psychology
Aged
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Ontario
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Social Environment
Stereotyping
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The future availability of HIV vaccines can increase options available to Canadian Black women for risk reduction. However, current conceptual frameworks do not adequately address barriers to HIV prevention for this population, and may be inadequate to address challenges with vaccines. This study explored knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV vaccines and associated prevention methods to inform appropriate conceptual frameworks for their dissemination to Canadian Black women. We completed four 90-min focus groups with women (n=26) of African or Caribbean origins, and six interviews with key informants providing health and social services in the Black communities of Toronto. The participants suggested that there were significant risks associated with seeking prevention information and attempting to reduce exposure to HIV infection. They described individual, familial, community and institutional domains of risk and predicted the same spectrum of risk for HIV vaccines. Participants advocated for education, empowerment and institutional change to create a supportive environment for vaccines and other HIV prevention methods. They further indicated that preparation for vaccine dissemination will need to prioritize building trust between women of the Black communities and institutions in the research, health and government sectors.
PubMed ID
18952342 View in PubMed
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Is the wait-for-patient-to-come approach suitable for African newcomers to Alberta, Canada?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124786
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Dec;40(6):523-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maryam Amin
Arnaldo Perez
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. maryam.amin@ualberta.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Dec;40(6):523-31
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa - ethnology
Alberta
Child, Preschool
Dental Care for Children - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Preventive Dentistry - statistics & numerical data
Psychology
Abstract
A qualitative study was conducted to identify psychosocial barriers to providing and obtaining preventive dental care for preschool children among African recent immigrants.
Seven focus groups were conducted with 48 mothers of 3- to 5-year-old children from Ethiopian, Eritrean, and Somali communities in Edmonton. Participants had lived in Canada for 5 years or less. Three debriefing interviews were conducted with the community health workers who facilitated the focus groups in participants' first languages. Data analysis consisted of assigning codes, grouping codes into existing or new categories of barriers, grouping identified categories into domains, and organizing categories and domains around a general perspective of psychosocial barriers to prevention of caries.
Barriers to prevention of early childhood caries (ECC) were associated with home-based prevention, early detection, and access to professional care. Barriers to parental prevention were related to health beliefs, knowledge, oral health approach, and skills. Barriers to early detection included perceived role of caregivers and dentists, perceived identity of ECC, ways of detecting cavities, and parental self-efficacy. Access barriers were related to parental knowledge of preventive services, attitudes toward dentists and dental services, English skills, and external constraints concerned dental insurance, social support, time, and transportation.
Preventive interventions should be aimed at assisting primary caregivers with providing and obtaining adequate dental care for their children through enhancing oral health literacy, developing new set of oral health-related skills, reducing environmental constraints, and strengthening their intention of obtaining professional preventive dental services.
PubMed ID
22548343 View in PubMed
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Mastery of mothering skills and satisfaction with associated health services: an ethnocultural comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150483
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;33(3):343-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Rob Whitley
Author Affiliation
Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center, 2 Whipple Place, Suite 202, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA. rob.whitley@dartmouth.edu
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;33(3):343-65
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Caribbean Region - ethnology
Consumer Satisfaction
Europe - ethnology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Maternal health services
Mothers
Parenting - ethnology
Quebec
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
In this paper, I examine the mastery of mothering skills and satisfaction with associated health services in women who had recently given birth in Montreal (n = 33). I compare experience between women of two distinct ethnocultural groups: Anglophone Euro-Canadian and Anglophone Afro-Caribbean. The overall aim is to discern differentials in the mastery of mothering skills and associated satisfaction with maternal and child health services. The study is framed by neo-Weberian social theory suggesting that modernization and bureaucratization increasingly eviscerate everyday skills and knowledge. These processes also lead to changes regarding what is considered credible 'authoritative knowledge.' I found that older Anglophone Euro-Canadians expressed the greatest skill deficits. They attempted to redress these deficits through consultation of professionally authored books, medical Web sites and health professionals. Older Anglophone Euro-Canadians saw these resources as sources of 'authoritative knowledge.' They also expressed dissatisfaction with related health services. In contrast, Anglophone Afro-Caribbeans and younger lower-income Anglophone Euro-Canadians expressed satisfaction with their skills. This derived from widespread previous experience with children and more extensive and readily available kith and kin networks. These were considered sources of 'authoritative knowledge' in this group. This group expressed less dissatisfaction with health services, as they did not need, or expect, these services to redress skill deficits.
PubMed ID
19507013 View in PubMed
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