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The encounters that rupture the myth: contradictions in midwives' descriptions and explanations of circumcised women immigrants' sexuality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51957
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Amy Leval
Catarina Widmark
Carol Tishelman
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2004 Sep;25(8):743-60
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anecdotes
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Midwifery - standards
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to analyze how Swedish midwives (n = 26) discuss sexuality in circumcised African women patients. In focus groups and interviews, discussions concentrated on care provided to circumcised women, training received for this care, and midwives' perceptions of female circumcision. An analytic expansion was performed for discussions pertaining to sexuality and gender roles. Results from the analysis show the following: (1) ethnocentric projections of sexuality; (2) a knowledge paradox regarding circumcision and sexuality; (3) the view of the powerless circumcised women; and (4) the fact that maternity wards function as meeting places between gender and culture where the encounters with men allow masculine hegemonic norms to be ruptured. We conclude that an increased understanding of cultural epistemology is needed to ensure quality care. The encounters that take place in obstetrical care situations can provide a space where gender and culture as prescribed norms can be questioned.
PubMed ID
15371079 View in PubMed
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A study of Swedish midwives' encounters with infibulated African women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63639
Source
Midwifery. 2002 Jun;18(2):113-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Catarina Widmark
Carol Tishelman
Beth Maina Ahlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Public Health Services, Division of International Health/IHCAR, 286, Karolinkska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Caterina.Widmark@phs.ki.se
Source
Midwifery. 2002 Jun;18(2):113-25
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anecdotes
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Circumcision, Female - ethnology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Midwifery - standards
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - ethnology - nursing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: to investigate Swedish midwives' perceptions and attitudes towards infibulation and infibulated women, midwives' experiences of providing care for them and the training the midwives describe having received to enable them to care for and deliver infibulated women. DESIGN: a multi-stage sampling procedure was used. Open-ended questionnaires were distributed to midwives in labour wards with the purpose of identifying midwives to contact for interviews and focus group discussions. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: twenty-six midwives from three labour wards and two antenatal clinics situated in two towns in central Sweden participated in eight focus group discussions and three individual interviews. FINDINGS: there were three major themes: (a) emotions and communicational challenges entailed in the care of infibulated women, (b) knowledge and skills needed for caring and (c) the midwives' reliance on the Swedish law when dealing with the dilemmas they face in their interactions with the women and their families. The data indicate communication problems on different levels between midwives and the women and their families. There appear to be few or no guidelines in the units on how to provide good care for infibulated women and little or no co-ordination between antenatal care and the maternity wards. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: the care of infibulated women during pregnancy and childbirth seems to be a marginalised issue in the areas where this study was performed. Early acknowledgement of female genital mutilation during pregnancy as well as improved communication between health care units may help professionals to offer culturally sensitive professional care to the women and their families.
PubMed ID
12139909 View in PubMed
Less detail