Skip header and navigation

1 records – page 1 of 1.

Demographics of tuberculosis in an emerging EU region in southern Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79526
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(11-12):1033-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Winqvist Niclas
Andersen Peter Henrik
Lillebaek Troels
Björkman Per
Miörner Håkan
Author Affiliation
Regional Department of Infectious Disease Control and Prevention, Malmö, Sweden. Niclas.Winqvist@skane.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(11-12):1033-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
To describe demographics of tuberculosis (TB) in the Øresund region, southern Scandinavia, a retrospective analysis of epidemiological data from TB registers and population databases, from 1995 to 2002, was performed. A total of 2678 TB cases were reported with an overall incidence of 6.3 per 100,000 person-y of observation. There were major differences in notification rates among immigrants depending on their country of origin and their residence in the Øresund region. In the Danish part, 37% of all cases among immigrants came from the Horn of Africa compared to 28% in the Swedish areas. Older age and residence in Denmark were independent risk factors for TB. Comparisons of TB rates within the group of immigrants from the Horn of Africa showed higher rates in the Danish areas compared to the Swedish areas. The discrepancies in notification rates could be explained by different socioeconomic circumstances in the 2 countries or by a greater immigration from highly endemic countries into Denmark during the study period; however, ongoing transmission in specific population groups at high risk of tuberculosis cannot be excluded. This highlights the need for continued and improved surveillance for TB, especially among newly arrived immigrants from highly endemic countries.
PubMed ID
17148073 View in PubMed
Less detail