Skip header and navigation

Refine By

86 records – page 1 of 9.

Acute disaster exposure and mental health complaints of Norwegian tsunami survivors six months post disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91783
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heir Trond
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. trond.heir@medisin.uio.no
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Bereavement
Dangerous Behavior
Disasters - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Friends
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the relationship between possible disaster stressors and subsequent health problems among tourists experiencing the 2004 South-East Asia tsunami. A cross-sectional study was performed as a postal survey concerning the experiences of the disaster exposure in retrospect and the presence of psychological symptoms (GHQ-28) in Norwegian tsunami victims 6 months post disaster. The strongest predictors of health complaints were danger of death, witness impressions, and bereavements. Aggravated outcomes were also seen in those who helped others in the acute phase or had sole responsibility for children when the tsunami struck. Having a family member or close friend who was injured was reversely associated with health problems. Women reported more psychological distress than men, but the difference disappeared with increasing degree of danger exposure. Dose-response relationships to psychological distress were found for single exposure factors as well as for the cumulative effects of being exposed to several exposure variables.
PubMed ID
18834277 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse life events as risk factors for behavioural and emotional problems in a 7-year follow-up of a population-based child cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113742
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Cathrine Skovmand Rasmussen
Louise Gramstrup Nielsen
Dorthe Janne Petersen
Erik Christiansen
Niels Bilenberg
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Department, Mental Health Hospital and University Clinic, Region of Southern Denmark, University of Southern Denmark , Sdr. Boulevard 29, DK-5000 Odense C , Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;68(3):189-95
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Divorce - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify risk factors for significant changes in emotional and behavioural problem load in a community-based cohort of Danish children aged 9-16 years, the risk factors being seven parental and two child-related adverse life events.
Data on emotional and behavioural problems was obtained from parents filling in the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) when the child was 8-9 and again when 15 years old. Data on risk factors was drawn from Danish registers. Analysis used was logistic regression for crude and adjusted change.
Parental divorce significantly raised the odds ratio of an increase in emotional and behavioural problems; furthermore, the risk of deterioration in problem behaviour rose significantly with increasing number of adverse life events. By dividing the children into four groups based on the pathway in problem load (increasers, decreasers, high persisters and low persisters), we found that children with a consistently high level of behavioural problems also had the highest number of adverse life events compared with any other group.
Family break-up was found to be a significant risk factor. This supports findings in previous studies. The fact that no other risk factor proved to be of significance might be due to lack of power in the study. Children experiencing high levels of adverse life events are at high risk of chronic problem behaviour. Thus these risk factors should be assessed in daily clinical practice.
PubMed ID
23692285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption among middle-aged women: a population-based study of Swedish women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9571
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2004;10(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Jenny Cederfjäll
Jonas Lidfeldt
Christina Nerbrand
Göran Samsioe
Agneta Ojehagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jenny.cederfjall@psykiatr.lu.se
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2004;10(1):15-21
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mathematical Computing
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Wine
Abstract
From a total population of 10,766 Swedish 50- to 59-year-old women, 6,917 (64.2%) participated in the Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) study, and among them 6,623 (95.7%) answered the questions on alcohol consumption. One out of 4 women (26.0%) consumed no alcohol in an ordinary week (non-drinkers), 57.4% consumed not more than 83 g alcohol, 12.5% consumed 84-167 g and 4.2% consumed 168 g or more. The weekly drinkers had a median consumption of 40.0 g alcohol (range 2.5-1,036.0) and the main sort of alcohol was wine. Comparing the four drinking groups, most differences occurred between the non-drinking and the weekly drinking women. The non-drinkers had lower socio-demographic status, poorer health and more symptoms, especially physical symptoms. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, most associations between non-drinking and lower socio-demographic status remained.
PubMed ID
14665801 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia and eating disorder symptoms in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144006
Source
Eat Disord. 2010 May-Jun;18(3):226-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Max Karukivi
Lea Hautala
Jan Korpelainen
Kirsi-Maria Haapasalo-Pesu
Pirjo-Riitta Liuksila
Matti Joukamaa
Simo Saarijarvi
Author Affiliation
Unit of Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Eat Disord. 2010 May-Jun;18(3):226-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
An increasing amount of evidence indicates an association between alexithymia and eating disorder symptoms. This possible association was evaluated in a non-clinical sample of late adolescents. Seven hundred and twenty nine adolescents completed the questionnaire and formed the final sample. Alexithymia was measured using the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale and eating disorder symptoms were assessed using the SCOFF questionnaire. The rate of alexithymia was 8.2%, without any gender difference. The mean SCOFF scores differed significantly between alexithymic and non-alexithymic subjects, and the share of SCOFF positive subjects was significantly higher among alexithymics. The results suggest that eating disorder symptoms are more common in alexithymic adolescents.
PubMed ID
20419527 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia and health behaviors in healthy male volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199587
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1999 Dec;47(6):635-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
K F Helmers
A. Mente
Author Affiliation
Graduate Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, Bethune College, York University, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1999 Dec;47(6):635-45
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sampling Studies
Sexual Behavior
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
The association between alexithymia and maladaptive health behaviors was evaluated in 118 young, healthy men, aged 18-45 years. Subjects completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26), and a health behaviors questionnaire, measuring alcohol and drug use, sedentary lifestyle, poor nutritional consumption, and risky sexual practices. In forced hierarchical regression analyses, the association between alexithymia and health behaviors was evaluated after adjusting for age, body mass index, social support, ambivalence over expression of emotion, and the expression of emotion. Results indicated that: (1) the TAS-26 and difficulty identifying feelings was associated with poor nutritional consumption; (2) difficulty identifying feelings was associated with greater alcohol and drug use; and (3) difficulty communicating feelings was associated with a more sedentary lifestyle. There was no association between risky sexual practices and alexithymia. These results suggest that, in young men, difficulties with identifying emotions and communicating emotions are associated with maladaptive nutritional habits, a sedentary lifestyle, and substance abuse, even after adjusting for other psychosocial and demographic variables. Such maladaptive health behaviors may help explain the association between alexithymia and premature mortality.
PubMed ID
10661609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia and health-related quality of life in a general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152665
Source
Psychosomatics. 2009 Jan-Feb;50(1):59-68
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aino K Mattila
Samuli I Saarni
Jouko K Salminen
Heini Huhtala
Harri Sintonen
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FIN-33014, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Psychosomatics. 2009 Jan-Feb;50(1):59-68
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life - psychology
Registries
Abstract
Alexithymia is thought to reflect a deficit in the cognitive processing of emotion, and, therefore, it may predispose individuals to both psychological and somatic symptoms.
The authors investigated the relationship between alexithymia and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a nationally representative population sample of 5,418 subjects, age 30 to 97 years.
Alexithymia was measured with the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and HRQoL measured with the 15D, a generic HRQoL measure.
Alexithymia was significantly associated with lower HRQoL independently of other variables. The TAS-20 subfactor Difficulties Identifying Feelings was the strongest common denominator between alexithymia and HRQoL.
Alexithymia may be a predisposing factor to poorer HRQoL.
PubMed ID
19213974 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia and life satisfaction in primary healthcare patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159882
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):523-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Aino K Mattila
Outi Poutanen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Raimo K R Salokangas
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FIN-33014, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Psychosomatics. 2007 Nov-Dec;48(6):523-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Primary Health Care - utilization
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Self-Assessment
Sickness Impact Profile
Abstract
The relationship between life satisfaction and alexithymia was studied in a sample of 229 patients as a part of a naturalistic follow-up study of depression in Finnish primary health care. The measures were the abbreviated Life Satisfaction Scale and the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Depression was assessed by telephone with the short form of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Of all subjects, 19.2% were alexithymic, and 9.2% were depressed. Alexithymia was negatively associated with life satisfaction even when depression and other confounding factors were controlled for. Alexithymia is a risk factor for life dissatisfaction in primary-care patients.
PubMed ID
18071100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia and psychological distress among frequent attendance patients in health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213347
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 1996;65(4):199-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Joukamaa
H. Karlsson
B. Sholman
V. Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 1996;65(4):199-202
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Sampling Studies
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to find out whether alexithymia is common in frequently attending primary health care patients and whether alexithymia and psychological distress are associated in these patients.
Alexithymia was measured by the TAS-26 and psychological distress by the SCL-25 in a random sample of 394 working-age primary health care patients. Frequent attendance was defined as a minimum of 11 visits during 1 year to different kinds of outpatient health care services, excluding specialized psychiatric care.
Frequently attending patients with psychological distress were found to be alexithymic more commonly than other patients, but this was not the case with other frequently attending patients. In other words, frequent attendance and alexithymia had an association mediated by psychological distress.
There is a subgroup of frequently attending patients, who are alexithymic and have psychological distress, too. They usually visit health-care services because of a somatic complaint. We hypothesize that their expression of psychological distress was masked and somatized just because of alexithymia.
PubMed ID
8843500 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia behaves as a personality trait over a 5-year period in Finnish general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168084
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2006 Aug;61(2):275-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
J K Salminen
S. Saarijärvi
T. Toikka
J. Kauhanen
E. Aärelä
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Population Research, Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute, Turku, Finland. jouko.salminen@ktl.fi
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2006 Aug;61(2):275-8
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Occupations
Personality
Psychological Tests
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Temporal stability is a basic assumption underlying any personality trait construct. Previous research on the stability of alexithymia has led to a controversy over whether alexithymia should be viewed as a state-dependent phenomenon or as a stable personality trait. The aim of this 5-year longitudinal study was to examine the temporal stability of alexithymia in the general population in Finland.
Alexithymia was measured with the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) at the baseline and 5 years later.
The test-retest correlations of the TAS-20 total and factor-specific scores at the baseline and at the 5-year follow-up ranged from moderate to high in both genders, reflecting a rather high relative stability of the TAS-20 scores over a period of 5 years.
The findings of our study suggest that alexithymia behaves like a stable personality trait in the general population.
PubMed ID
16880032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alexithymia, depression and tinnitus in elderly people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161162
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2007 Sep-Oct;29(5):431-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jaakko Salonen
Reijo Johansson
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turku University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 52, FIN-20521 Turku, Finland. jaakko.salonen@tyks.fi
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2007 Sep-Oct;29(5):431-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity - trends
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Tinnitus - epidemiology
Abstract
Tinnitus is known to have an association with depression and other psychiatric disorders. As part of a larger epidemiological survey, we evaluated the associations among tinnitus, depression and alexithymia in a group of elderly people.
A survey of hearing loss, audiological rehabilitation and associated morbidity in a senior population was conducted in Turku, Finland. The study sample consisted of 583 participants aged between 70 and 85 years. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) was used to measure alexithymia, whereas the 13-item version of the Beck Depression Inventory was used to measure depression; the subjective experience of tinnitus was queried with a questionnaire.
Depression had a clear association with subjectively annoying tinnitus. Contrary to expectations, the TAS-20 score did not correlate with the severity of tinnitus. In fact, the highest TAS-20 scores were found among the subjects who had tinnitus but did not find it to be subjectively annoying. No significant association between high TAS-20 scores and hearing loss was found.
Although we found an association between TAS-20 scores and the presence of tinnitus, alexithymia does not seem to be helpful in explaining tinnitus annoyance among elderly people.
PubMed ID
17888810 View in PubMed
Less detail

86 records – page 1 of 9.